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Minneapolis Corridor Housing Initiative Lake Street Sites Center for Neighborhoods 2004 Created by the Design Center for American Urban Landscape, University.

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Presentation on theme: "Minneapolis Corridor Housing Initiative Lake Street Sites Center for Neighborhoods 2004 Created by the Design Center for American Urban Landscape, University."— Presentation transcript:

1 Minneapolis Corridor Housing Initiative Lake Street Sites Center for Neighborhoods 2004 Created by the Design Center for American Urban Landscape, University of Minnesota for Center for Neighborhoods, Minneapolis Corridor Housing Initiative

2 Lake Street Presentation Corridor Housing Initiative People in the Lake Street Corridor Project Lake Street Timeline Lake Street SitesSites Site ASite AUsed Car Lot Site BSite BSpirit of the Lakes Church Site CSite CBread Shop

3 Corridor Housing Initiative Aims Center for Neighborhoods The Corridor Housing Initiative demonstrates replicable models of proactive, integrated planning and consensus building among neighborhoods, the city, and the county. The Corridor Housing Initiative produces economically and politically viable development projects that include affordable housing options along corridors and meet city goals and neighborhood interests. The new Corridor Housing Initiative model(s) and resulting projects produce new affordable housing options more efficiently and effectively than conventional development processes.

4 People in Lake Street Coordinators: Center for Neighborhoods Neighborhood: PPNA, Spirit of the Lakes, and Midtown Phillips Facilitators: Center for Policy, Planning and Performance (CPPP) Design: Design Center for American Urban Landscape Development: Central Community Housing Trust Government: City of Minneapolis

5 Lake Street Timeline Early 2003: Lake Street Initiative visioning October 2003: PPNA selected for Corridor Initiative through RFP January 2004: First meeting of Lake St. Corridor Initiative Steering Committee April 2004: Developer and stakeholder focus groups May 1, 2004: Development workshop May-June 2004: Presentations to local neighborhood and business groups

6 Lake Street Sites A B C LAKE STREET A = Used Car Lot B = Spirit of the Lakes Church C = Bread Shop 13 TH AVENUE

7 Site A Used Car Lot Base site Expanded site LAKE STREET 11 th AVENUE

8 Site A View from Lake Street at 11 th Avenue View toward Lake Street from 11 th Avenue

9 Group created development options from block models representing standard unit sizes. New development option numbers were calculated by a development consultant during workshop. The development consultant used standard assumptions about developer fees (approx. 5%), subsidies, construction costs, and rental/sales prices.

10 Development Costs Workshop developed detailed analysis like illustration to left (no need to read ittheres a shorter version in the next slide). Analysis shows that site A becomes more viable with increased numbers of units unit options were attractive to participants and broke even if there were approx 30 affordable units to get subsidies, although land price estimate was low. Includes below ground parking.

11 Site A Scenarios VariablesScenario 1Scenario 2Scenario 3 Height2 story3.5 story3.5 story, expanded site Units % site green9%32% % site paved36%14% On ground parking1700 Below ground parking # market rate rental91625 # affordable rental81524 Gain (loss)($205,054)($297,711)($215,487) Gain (loss)/unit($12,062)($9,604)($4,398) Assumes land purchase/demolition at $20 per square ft.

12 Site A unit versions of scenario 3 Version 3: Participants design Version 1 Version 2

13 Site B Spirit of the Lakes Church Base site Expanded site for cost purposes although the bottom half was excluded from development by workshop participants LAKE STREET 13 th AVENUE

14 Site B Views from Lake Street

15 Site B Views from 13 th Avenue

16 Workshop group investigated options for both a base site and a larger one. Options emphasized housing for GLBT seniors. Development options building on the base site onlyto save land costs--and with less commercial development were more cost effective as shown in Scenario 2 on the next page.

17 Site B Scenarios VariablesScenario 1Scenario 2Scenario 3 Height2 story3.5 story3.5 story, expanded site Units % site green8%18%27% % site paved57%42%32% On ground parking Below ground parking # market rate rental # affordable rental72428 Gain (loss)($492,643)($51,652)($1,285,514) Gain (loss)/unit($27,369)($1,324)($17,140) Assumes land purchase/demolition at $20 per square ft.

18 Site B: AIA Charette, February units of housing + church + parking (between Scenarios 1 and 2)

19 Site B: Development Workshop Scenarios Step back at rear Lake Street Lower height at rear Top image shows expanded site which is not cost effective but has parking entry from rear and building that steps back at a rear plaza (68 unitsclose to scenario 3). Bottom image shows base site with building height reduced at rear to match existing neighborhood (39 unitsclose to scenario 2).

20 Site B: Scenario 2 Options Views of two versions of building from front with step down height at rear Version 1 Views of front and back of a version with step back to plaza at rear Version 3 Rear view 3 Version 2

21 Site C Bread Shop Base site Expanded site LAKE STREET 14 th AVENUE S

22 Site C View from Lake Street View from 14 th Avenue

23 On site C both less intensive and highly intensive levels of development can be made cost effective. In either case the Lake Street Initiative stressed leaving views along 14 th Avenue S.

24 Site C Scenarios VariablesScenario 1Scenario 2Scenario 3 Height2 story3.5 story3.5 story, expanded site Units % site green9%32%28% % site paved36%14%22% On ground parking36014 Below ground parking # market rate rental # affordable rental Gain (loss)($86,057)($525,713)($403,154) Gain (loss)/unit($2,207)($7,965)($5,929) Assumes land purchase/demolition at $20 per square ft.

25 Site C Lake Street Initiative Top image shows building massing close to that of the Lake Street Initiative (Scenario 1). Bottom image shows expanded site with more intensive development that still maintains views though to 14 th Avenue S (Scenario 3).

26 V Three Options for Models on Previous Page Scenario 1, close to Lake Street Initiative (39 units) Scenario 3 (68 units) Basic version Scenario 3 (68 units) Version with gateway

27 Lake Street Presentation Corridor Housing Initiative Organizations in Lake Street Corridor Project Lake Street Timeline Lake Street Sites Site AUsed Car Lot Site BSpirit of Lakes Church Site CBread Shop Handouts: Development Costs for Sites A, B, C; Site Map

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29 Credits © Design Center for American Urban Landscape, College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, University of Minnesota and the Center for Neighborhoods. The Design Center is solely responsible for statements and errors in the materials. Permission is granted for use of this presentation for non-profit educational purposes. Acknowledgement is required. Stand-alone use of Design Center images is permitted with acknowledgement. Design Center Project Team: Ann Forsyth, Director (Lake Street contact) Dan Marckel, Senior Research Fellow Frank Fitzgerald, Research Fellow Wira Noeradi, Research Fellow Nathan Burt, Research Assistant Ian Kaminski-Coughlin, Research Assistant Jorge Salcedo, Research Assistant Katie Thering, Research Specialist David Lowe, Office Specialist II Design Center for American Urban Landscape 1 Rapson Hall 89 Church Street Minneapolis, MN


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