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Absence Reasons Study Amy Wiseman, Susan Dawson, Mohan Rao 06/11/13 Health & Community Student Attendance Academic Achievement Individual, Family Outcomes.

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Presentation on theme: "Absence Reasons Study Amy Wiseman, Susan Dawson, Mohan Rao 06/11/13 Health & Community Student Attendance Academic Achievement Individual, Family Outcomes."— Presentation transcript:

1 Absence Reasons Study Amy Wiseman, Susan Dawson, Mohan Rao 06/11/13 Health & Community Student Attendance Academic Achievement Individual, Family Outcomes

2 Summit Agenda Introductions Attendance in Central Texas Absence Reasons Study methods High level findings Discussion of high level findings Detailed findings for action Discussion of potential community actions Share big ideas and next steps

3 E 3 Alliance uses objective data and focused community collaboration to align our education systems so all students succeed and lead Central Texas to economic prosperity Mission E 3 Alliance is a Catalyst For Educational Change in Central Texas E 3 serves as the Central Texas regional P-16 Council

4 MISSION AND PURPOSE COH enables communities to visualize the health of their neighborhoods, identify assets and needs, unearth and nurture opportunities for collaborative change and monitor outcomes over time through GIS mapping and related analysis applied to public and privately held data sets.

5 THANK YOU COH Board of Directors Seton Healthcare Family* St. Davids Foundation* Central Health* University of Texas* Lone Star Circle of Care* City of Austin* Austin Independent School District H-E-B* Early Childhood Community E3 Alliance Lifeworks Housing Authority of the City of Austin Communities in Schools of Central Texas * Denotes funding member

6 THANKS! Aliya Hussaini Brenda Richmond Ellen Richards Eric Metcalf Elsa Hinojosa Freddie McFarland Jesse Simmons John-Michael Cortez Katherine Wright Lynda Acosta Maureen Britton Rachel Ladov Rosamaria Murillo Ruth Roberts Sally Freeman Sari McCoy Susan Millea Stephen Pont Tracy Diggs Lunoff Todd Hemingson Advisory Board Members:

7 MISSING SCHOOL MATTERS

8 Background E3 Alliance spearheading regional approach to increase student attendance Have better descriptive data than ever before Community awareness campaign underway Far too little objective data to target systems changes Have worked with schools, health community to design ground-breaking absence reasons study © 2013 E 3 Alliance

9 Early Successes Missing School Matters Campaign branded, supplied, launched –Aligned with AARO CAT Committee –And new MSM Taskforce Get Schooled Challenge in 20 schools –5 schools in Top 25 Nationwide –Stony Point HS Nationwide winner Goal: 2 percentage point improvement in attendance by 2014 Improved student achievement $34M to Central Texas schools © 2013 E 3 Alliance

10 Virtuous or Vicious Cycle? Health & Community Student Attendance Academic Achievement Individual, Family Outcomes Have Data Significant national studies Need better information to make better decisions and allocate services & resources better © 2013 E 3 Alliance

11 ATTENDANCE IN CENTRAL TEXAS

12 Over 300,000 Students in Central Texas

13 2.4 Million Student Absences in Central Texas per Year Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center; 2010-2011 school year. © 2013 E 3 Alliance

14 Central Texas has More Absences than Texas on Average at Every Grade Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center. © 2012 E 3 Alliance

15 Poorest Students Have Much Higher Absenteeism Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center. © 2013 E 3 Alliance

16 Graduation Rates for Low Income Students in Central Texas Consistently Lower than in Texas Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of high school graduation data at the UT Educational Resource Center © 2013 E 3 Alliance

17 Central Texas Low Income Graduation Rates Among Lowest in State Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of high school graduation data at the UT Educational Resource Center © 2013 E 3 Alliance

18 Average Absences for Low Income Students in Central Texas Higher than in Texas Average Number of Absences by Grade and Economic Status, 2011-12 Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at the UT Educational Resource Center © 2013 E 3 Alliance

19 Average Absences for Low Income Students in Central Texas Higher than in Texas Average Number of Absences by Grade and Economic Status, 2011-12 Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at the UT Educational Resource Center © 2013 E 3 Alliance

20 What We Know Students miss far too much school Low Income students miss more in Central Texas Missing school correlates directly with poor academic outcomes and with higher BMI Where overall absenteeism is geographically Which students miss school why, with what frequency, where What We Dont Know © 2013 E 3 Alliance

21 What We Dont Know… How many students miss because of illness? Which students miss because of chronic versus acute illness? What percent of absences are asthma or diabetes related? How do health-related absences relate to other at-risk factors, such as teen pregnancy? Are there demographic or geographic patterns related to different types of absences? © 2013 E 3 Alliance

22 Reason Code Study: The Bottom Line First of its kind study in the state (maybe US?) Data to drive regional decision-making How health and community systems interact with student attendance and achievement Direct benefit to participating schools Designed to be representative of regional population to benefit whole district, Central Texas region Funded by St. Davids Foundation, Central Health © 2013 E 3 Alliance

23 ABSENCE REASONS STUDY METHODS

24 Key Research Questions 1.What reasons for student absences do we see and what is their prevalence for Central Texas students? 2.Are there different reasons why different student groups are absent? 3.What other health, geographic, and at-risk factors are associated with different absence reasons and might influence community decisions about interventions? –e.g. neighborhood, availability of medical and dental services, etc. © 2013 E 3 Alliance

25 Design of Absence Reasons Study Conducted national literature review on reasons for absence Determined original research needed –This study is first of its kind nationally! Developed absence reasons based on lit review and local discussion (see handouts) Chose districts and schools to be demographically representative of region –9 schools (5 ES, 2 MS, 2 HS) in 2 Districts © 2013 E 3 Alliance

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28 Absence Reasons Study Participation Trained study personnel to collect detailed codes with consistency Proactively introduced study to parents –Parents reached for 93% of absences –Only 0.5% of parents (1 in 200) opted out

29 Study Limitations Answers about absence reasons Parent self-report of reason OR Coding personnel interprets parent description and determines code Do not know if parents sharing real reason © 2013 E 3 Alliance

30 DEMOGRAPHICS AND DISTRICT COMPARISON

31 Student Demographics 8959 students 50% Low Income – exact same as region Ethnic breakdown 42% At-risk – region 39% –PISD 15% more students At-risk © 2013 E 3 Alliance Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PISD & HCISD demographic data for 2012-13 Study SampleRegion Asian4% Black16%9% Hispanic53%47% White27%40%

32 Source: E3 Alliance analysis of Absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD August through March 2012-13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Absences over Time Remarkably Similar Across Districts

33 Source: E3 Alliance analysis of Absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD August through March 2012-13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Absences over Time Remarkably Similar Across Districts

34 Hays and Pflugerville have Similar Proportions of Absence Reasons Absence reasons were consistent across both districts –However more asthma and skipping in PISD –Some differences between middle schools Source: E3 Alliance analysis of Absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD, 1/14/13-3/8/13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance

35 STUDY ABSENCES AND REASONS

36 16,800 Student Absences in 9 Schools Across 8 Weeks © 2013 E 3 Alliance Source: E3 Alliance analysis of absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD, 1/14/13-3/8/13 Does not include time out of class related to school events or on site at another campus

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39 Top 10 Reasons for Absence: 72% of Absences Source: E3 Alliance analysis of absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD, 1/14/13-3/8/13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance (8124)

40 Less Common Reasons Are 4% Combined (630 Absences Total) © 2013 E 3 Alliance Source: E3 Alliance analysis of absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD, 1/14/13-3/8/13 Family Logistics Asthma College Visit Transportation Issue Court/Legal Dental Treatment Students Child Sick

41 Rare Absence Reasons (200 Absences Total) Diabetes School Refusal Missed Bus Obtain Drivers License Runaway Join Military Dental Pain At Work Source: E3 Alliance analysis of absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD, 1/14/13-3/8/13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance

42 DISCUSSION OF OVERALL FINDINGS © 2013 E 3 Alliance Source: E3 Alliance analysis of absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD, 1/14/13-3/8/13 How aware were you of the importance of attendance for student success? Were you aware of how varied absence reasons are? What findings were most surprising?

43 DETAILED FINDINGS

44 Medical Absences More Variable Than Non-Medical Absences Over Time Source: E3 Alliance analysis of Absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD, 1/14/13-3/8/13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance

45 Acute Illnesses Match Overall Absence Pattern Source: E3 Alliance analysis of Absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD August through March 2012-13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance

46 Acute Illnesses Match Overall Absence Pattern Source: E3 Alliance analysis of Absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD August through March 2012-13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance

47 MEDICAL ABSENCES Action-Oriented Findings

48 Average Medical Absences Per Student Varies by Medical Issue © 2013 E 3 Alliance Absence Type Number of Students Number of Absences Average Absences / Student Notes Acute Illness360381242.3 Chronic Illness (not Asthma) 2667072.7 6 students account for 29% of absences Asthma831271.5 Majority in PISD Mental Health (non-crisis) 802543.2 Source: E3 Alliance analysis of Absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD, 1/14/13-3/8/13

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52 Proportion of Absences Treated Varies by Absence Type Source: E3 Alliance analysis of Absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD, 1/14/13-3/8/13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance

53 Proportion of Absences Treated Varies by Absence Type Source: E3 Alliance analysis of Absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD, 1/14/13-3/8/13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance

54 Proportion of Absences Treated Varies by Absence Type Source: E3 Alliance analysis of Absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD, 1/14/13-3/8/13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance

55 Proportion of Absences Treated Varies by Absence Type Source: E3 Alliance analysis of Absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD, 1/14/13-3/8/13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance

56 If Not Treated, Why Not? For health absences that were not treated: For 96%, parents said treatment not needed For 2%, parents said reason was no insurance or cost For 2%, parents said it was for other reason –Problem being seen –Transportation problem –Hours/Scheduling problem Source: E3 Alliance analysis of Absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD, 1/14/13-3/8/13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance

57 NON-MEDICAL ABSENCES Action-Oriented Findings

58 Family Related Absences Vary by Gender (335) (293) (96) (47) (90) (69)

59 Family Related Absences Vary by Gender (335) (293) (96) (47) (90) (69)

60 Family Related Absences Vary by Gender (335) (293) (96) (47) (90) (69)

61 High Proportion of Disadvantaged Students Source: E3 Alliance analysis of Absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD, 1/14/13-3/8/13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance

62 Family Related Absences More Disadvantaged Students Source: E3 Alliance analysis of Absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD, 1/14/13-3/8/13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance % of Students

63 Family Related Absences More Disadvantaged Students Source: E3 Alliance analysis of Absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD, 1/14/13-3/8/13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance

64 More Skipping in 9 th and 12 th Grade Source: E3 Alliance analysis of Absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD, 1/14/13-3/8/13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance

65 Most of Skipping by At-Risk Students Source: E3 Alliance analysis of Absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD, 1/14/13-3/8/13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance % of Students

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68 DEMOGRAPHIC SUB-GROUPS AND TYPICAL ABSENCE TYPES Action-Oriented Findings

69 Low Income Students Have More than Their Share of Non-Medical Absences Source: E3 Alliance analysis of Absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD, 1/14/13-3/8/13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance % of Low Income Students

70 At-Risk Students Have More than Their Share of Absences for Many Reasons Source: E3 Alliance analysis of Absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD, 1/14/13-3/8/13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance % of At-Risk Students

71 Chronic Absenteeism Worst in High School Source: E3 Alliance analysis of Absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD August through March 2012-13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance

72 Chronically Absent Students Have Far More than Their Share of Absences Source: E3 Alliance analysis of Absence data from 9 schools in PISD & HCISD, 1/14/13-3/8/13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance % of Chronically Absent Students

73 SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS

74 Overall Conclusions Nearly half of absences due to acute illness Geographical location of hotspots vary widely by absence reason Amount of health related absences over time vary with acute illness outbreaks Amount of non-health related absences relatively consistent over time % of health-related absences where student receiving treatment depends on absence reason

75 Overall Conclusions % of absences mostly in proportion to % of population for –School district membership (but asthma in Pflugerville) –Special education status –English Language Learner status (except skipping) % of absences mostly disproportionate to % of population for –Chronic absenteeism –Gender –Income status –At-risk status –School level –Ethnicity (only for some absence reasons)

76 Conclusions Populations to concentrate community services –Low income and students at-risk of dropping out –9 th to 10 th graders and grades leading up to those –Students with chronic absenteeism in any grade Absence reasons to concentrate community services –Chronic Illness –Skipping –What else?

77 DISCUSSION AND ACTION PLANNING In your issue area, what specific actions can we take as a community to decrease absenteeism, impacting both student achievement and family health? As a table, come up with one Big Idea to share Be ready to report back to the group!!

78 Student Health Student Attendance Academic Achievement Individual, Family Outcomes The conclusions of this research do not necessarily reflect the opinions or official position of the Texas Education Agency, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, or the State of Texas.


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