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A student read four sonnets and five limericks. How many lines of poetry were read?

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Presentation on theme: "A student read four sonnets and five limericks. How many lines of poetry were read?"— Presentation transcript:

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2 A student read four sonnets and five limericks. How many lines of poetry were read?

3 What is your students biggest literacy problem? What are your goals/hope for literacy? What is reading What have you done already to aid comprehension in your class?

4 Set up Group Norms Discuss Literacy Goals & Responsibilities Discuss Challenging Text & Literacy Strategies 4 Keys of Comprehension

5 1. Maintain a positive attitude 2. Listen to one another 3. Value one anothers opinions 4. Active Participation 5. Try to get something out of each lesson

6 Summarize the text. What reading challenges did you encounter? What did you do to make sense of the text?

7 Work on a personal goal Try literacy strategies in the classroom Share literacy strategies/progress with your department Contribute to the Literacy Newsletter Collaborate with the Lit Coach

8 There are tork gooboos of puzballs, including laplies, mushos, and fushos. Even if you bartle the puzballs that tovo inny and onny of the pern, they do not grunto any lipples. In order to geemee a puzball that grunto lipples, you should bartle the fusho who has rackled the parshtootoos after her humply fluflu. 1. How many gooboos of puzballs are there? 2. What are laplies, mushos, and fushos? 3. Even if you bartle the puzballs that tovo inny and onny of the pern, they will not what? 4. How can you geemee a puzball that gruntos lipples?

9 Summarize the text. What reading challenges did you encounter? What did you do to make sense of the text?

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11 1. Activate background knowledge & make connections between the new and the known information 2. Monitor Comprehension - Employing fix-up strategies to repair confusion 3. Self-Questioning the text to clarify ambiguity and deepen understanding Pearson et al Tovani Text - Page 5

12 4. Marking inferences from the text using background knowledge & clues from the text 5. Determining importance in text to separate details from main ideas 6. Using sensory images to enhance comprehension & visualize reading 7. Synthesizing and extending thinking Pearson et al Tovani Text - Page 5

13 A strategy is an intentional plan that is flexible and can be adapted to meet the demands of the situation. Strategies give readers options for thinking about text when reading words alone does produce meaning.

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15 A student who appears to understand every sentence and yet cannot answer a single question about the passage as a whole.

16 Students who appear to have the linguistic proficiency to deal with a text, but are unable to do so because they are approaching it in an inappropriate way

17 Students - I didnt understand the chapter. Teacher – What part of it? Students – All of it.

18 Math p.45 Business p.58 Foreign p. 68 Language Englishp.72 Using T-Chart Identify why a student might have difficulty comprehending the text List possible strategies to help

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20 Teacher modeling I Do Guided Practice Collaborative learning We do Independent Practice Application of the Strategy You do Fisher & Frey, 2007

21 1. Frame the Text Activate Background Information 2. Set a Clear Purpose 3. Provide a method to monitor comprehension or hold on to thinking 4. Social discussion

22 Past experiences always influence new learning. What we know acts as a filter, helping us attend to those things that have meaning and discard those that dont. When we read something new, we are much more likely to understand it if we see connections that make it relevant. When these connections are murky or unseen, reading comprehension gets cloudy. (Kelly Gallagher Deeper Reading (2004)

23 Read The Procedure silently Write down what you think it means

24 Great for activating background information OR review Directions: Have students fold a piece of paper in half. Starting with the left column, students will list as many ideas as they can about a particular topic (2-3 minutes). Then students will circulate throughout room and exchange ideas. They will give one idea and then take one from their peers. (2-3 minutes) Discuss ideas as a group. *Optional – Have students write a summary using lists

25 An anticipation guide consists of a list of statements that are related to the topic of the text your students will be reading. While some of the statements may be clearly true or false, a good anticipation guide includes statements that provoke disagreement and challenge students beliefs about the topic. Before reading the text, students indicate for each statement whether they agree or disagree with it. Serve two primary purposes: 1. Elicit students prior knowledge of the topic of the text. 2. Set a purpose for reading. Agree Disagree _____ ______ 1. I would want to know if I carried the cancer gene. _____ ______ 2. Genetically predetermining the sex of a baby is immoral.

26 Purpose: To activate and evaluate student knowledge of a topic. Directions: 1. Generate a list of words related to your lesson. These words should represent concepts that are both familiar and unfamiliar to students. 2. Have students create 5 possible sentences that might be found in the text by using two words in each sentence until all words are gone. 3. Share a few sentences on white board or smart board 4. Read the text. 5. Have students confirm, modify, or extend the sentences.

27 AtomsAlkalinePeriodic table NeutronHalogensMass NonmetalsElementsIsotope RadioactivityMoleculesCompound AtomsAlkalinePeriodic table

28 The alkaline atoms are in the first group of the periodic table. The halogens are nonmetals. Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have the same atomic number but different atomic masses due to a different number of neutrons. (*reference – Chemistry Addison-Wesley) AtomsAlkalinePeriodic table NeutronHalogensMass NonmetalsElementsIsotope RadioactivityMoleculesCompound

29 A synthesis of research indicated all the following enhance reading comprehension: 1. Well-presented physical text features 2. Student awareness of text structure 3. Explicit instruction in text structure/feature

30 How well does your students know your textbook (or classroom text)?

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33 Making thinking visible model your own thinking and learning process and demonstrate how to construct meaning Think aloud – verbalizing the thoughts you have as you read, surfacing the inner conversation Text-coding – Leave tracks of thinking directly on the text; (questions, confusions, or thoughts, etc) Active Literacy Classroom

34 Preview the Chapter – Headings, subheadings, diagrams/charts, captions, summary box Text Features – bold terms, color codes, italics Preview Unfamiliar Vocabulary Identify the type of writing structure – informational, cause/effect, problem-solution, directional, etc.

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36 Change is inevitable

37 * Great for activating background knowledge or assessing meaning Students generate: captions for illustrations headings for text sections * Variation – Students can sketch diagrams or illustration from a caption

38 What does it say? What does it NOT say?

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40 Have you check your own bookshelves lately?

41 Go to your high school reunion a multimillionaire but 200 pounds overweight OR Go poor but in perfect shape?

42 1. Maintain a positive attitude 2. Listen to one another 3. Value one anothers opinions 4. Active Participation 5. Try to get something out of each lesson

43 Balance of modeling vs independent Knowing student reading levels Getting students to become active readers Motivation

44 1. Background Knowledge – The more background knowledge a reader has about a topic, the more difficult text he can read 2. Interest & Motivation – If a reader has interest in the topic or is motivated to read the text, he will work harder to comprehend meaning 3. Purpose – When a reader knows why he is reading something and knows what task is required for the text, he can better sift and sort information to determine what is important

45 Teacher modeling I Do Guided Practice Collaborative learning We do Independent Practice Application of the Strategy You do Fisher & Frey, 2007

46 A strategy is an intentional plan that is flexible and can be adapted to meet the demands of the situation. Strategies give readers options for thinking about text when reading words alone does produce meaning.

47 3 – Main Ideas 2 – Questions 1 – Statement that stands out

48 The purpose readers set for themselves as they read affects comprehension in several ways. First, it determines the speed of the reading. If readers are scanning the phone book for a name, they can read very quickly. It they are reading a math word problem, they most likely read slowly to catch important information. Purpose also determines what the reader remembers. When readers have purpose, they tend to remember more of the text. (Cris Tovani, Do I Have to Teach Reading? 2004)

49 Express & Reflect Inquire & Explore Inform & explain Analyze & Interpret Take a Stand Evaluate & Judge Propose a Solution Seek Common Ground Reading Rhetorically Bean, Chappell, and Gilliam

50 Why did the author write it? Purpose? Who was the authors intended audience?

51 Mark Twain once said, No one is smart enough to remember all that he knows. When I dont have a way to hold my thinking while reading challenging texts, I often have trouble remembering or returning to my reading. No matter how hard I try to remember my thinking as I read, I forget it if I dont have a way to make it permanent. I especially struggle to remember the reading if it is difficult or boring. I find that the same is true for my students. (Cris Tovani, Do I Have to Teach Reading? 2004)

52 When it comes to Marking the Text: throw away the highlighter in favor of a pen or pencil. Highlighting can actually distract from the business of learning and dilute your comprehension. It only seems like an active reading strategy; in actual fact, it can lull you into a dangerous passivity. errogatingtexts.html

53 Double Journal Sticky Notes Learning Logs Sketches Cornell Notes Refer to Strategy Packet

54 Great way for students to understand and organize textbook material. Useful for prewriting Types: Clustering Venn diagram Hierarchy Categorical Refer to strategy packet

55 Directions: Have the students list the numbers 3, 2, 1 on their paper leaving lines between each number. Assign a specific writing prompt/task for each number. Prompts will vary according to the content. GENERIC example 3 – Observations you made while reading 2 –Two connections you made while reading 1 – Select one important quote from the text. SCIENCE example 3 – Identify at least three differences between acids and bases. 2 – List two uses of acids and two uses of bases. 1 – State one reason knowledge of acids and bases is important to people in our community?

56 Students visualize the text and create pictorial representations to demonstrate comprehension: Cartoons, diagrams, doodles Ex – Demon in the Freezer Refer to Strategy Packet

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58 Read the poem, Billiards Rate your comprehension of the poem on a scale of 1 to 10 (1 = very low - 10 = extremely well)

59 This strategy helps the reader combine text information with prior knowledge to make inferences about the text. Great for guiding students to higher level thinking. Directions: The teacher models the four column chart. Questions can be generated by teacher, student, and/or class discussion. Students will complete the chart. QuestionIt SaysI SayAnd So (Read the Question) (Find information from the text that will help you answer the question) (Think about what you know about that information.) (combine what the text says with what you know to make an inference & answer the question)

60 This strategy helps students determine importance, summarize, and make inferences & generalizations. PURPOSE - ASSESSMENT Directions: Write a key word on the board. Students are to explain why the key word would best describe the chapter using examples from the text. Chapter Example: Motion & Movement Why is friction a key word for discussing chapter 3? PURPOSE - STUDENT DISCUSSION Directions: In small groups or individually, students will pick one word that best describes the text AND will support their answers using evidence from the text. Format: 1. The most important word in this selection is ____ 2. List several reasons for choosing this word. (use the text as evidence) 3. Students will share word & defend selection Possible post discussion activity - ask students if they would change their word after listening to the other groups.

61 3-4 times a week, share an interesting piece of reading. The reading selections are from variety of genres from various sources. Sometimes the activity is a springboard into the lesson and sometimes it is a quick 1-2 minute sharing of text. SourcesBenefits News headlines Book blurbs/reviews Charts/graphs Cartoons/graphics Song lyrics/poetry Postcards Quotes/biographical Manuals Provides background knowledge Sparks high interest Encourages reading motivation Makes connections to the current world Exposes students to a wide genres of texts Increases awareness to surrounding texts Develops critical thinking

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63 Read the passage on p.9, No Easy Answers silently Your purpose – Select a key sentence, phrase, and/or word from the passage

64 Work on a personal goal Try literacy strategies in the classroom Share literacy strategies/progress with your department Contribute to the Literacy Newsletter Collaborate with the Lit Coach

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66 1. Frame the Text Activate Background Information 2. Set a Clear Purpose 3. Provide a method to monitor comprehension or hold on to thinking 4. Social discussion

67 1. What two places may cause students difficulty? 2. What will you model that will help students negotiate the difficult parts? 3. What do they need to do with the information they are reading? 4. How will they hold their thinking while they read?

68 Silent Discussion In pairs, students are instructed to write a response to a chapter, story, or nonfiction text Students will exchange their response and write back to one another. This exchange is repeated several times. VARIATION – Write Around – when student groups (4-5) pass around written responses

69 Group Task 1. Each member select one article to read 2. Answer the following: Should the limit be changed? 3. After 2-3 minutes, pass your written response to the person next to you. 4. Read their response and write back to them.

70 SKILLS Questioning Paraphrasing/Summarizing Citing evidence Synthesizing Reading Critically

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72 Role Geneticist Expecting Mother Heath Insurance agent Gene Audience Parent Doctor Baby Cancer Format Brochure Advertisement Dear Abby Letter Supreme Court Testimony Topic Do-It-Yourself Genetic Testing Genetic Screening DNA Decoding Gender Selection


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