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Presentation by Benicia Dsa, NISOD 2012 Assistant Professor, Bergen Community College TCC presenter: Carol Chenoweth, Library Liaison to HSS.

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Presentation on theme: "Presentation by Benicia Dsa, NISOD 2012 Assistant Professor, Bergen Community College TCC presenter: Carol Chenoweth, Library Liaison to HSS."— Presentation transcript:

1 Presentation by Benicia Dsa, NISOD 2012 Assistant Professor, Bergen Community College TCC presenter: Carol Chenoweth, Library Liaison to HSS

2 Types of Films Documentaries films that represent a real world, with performances by social actors rather than professional actors Thin Blue Line, Bowling for Columbine Docudramas An interpretation of historical events that actually did occur – have a basis in truth Glory, Shindlers List, Thirteen Days, Argo Historical Fiction Involve fictional plots that are situated in a historical context Gone with the Wind, Lawrence of Arabia Titanic, Abraham Lincoln – Vampire Hunter

3 Why Use Film? Visual and Auditory Senses Engaged leads to greater retention and commitment of ideas and information to long term memory arouses the emotions of the students Serve as Historical Narrative Capacity to provide a powerful reconstruction that tells how historical people witnessed, understood, and lived their lives Students Achieve Historical Familiarity Difficulty in understanding cultural differences – being able to visualize significant events changes their thoughts and attitude about various historical events – increases their comprehensibility Alternative to Lectures Movies are popular!

4 Cautions in Using Film Docudramas are subject to controversy regarding their presentation of historical information through story telling 1)Dramatic license (creation of materials not established as historical facts or even the violation of known facts) 2)Audience may not be able to distinguish between facts and speculation 3)Tendency toward simplification

5 Selection of Films Define the concepts you want to teach Identify possible films that could be used to enhance students understating of these concepts. Watch the film prior to showing it for students to judge the appropriateness of the entire film or selected clips (more on this later)

6 Entire Films or Clips? Advantages of showing clips from the film: Allows instructor to use particular scenes, stop and discuss them, and connect them conceptually – for example, using clips from Mississippi Burning to illustrate the civil rights era Allows use of relevant scenes from films that may contain material that may be offensive to some viewers, i.e., clips from Amistad on the horrors of the slave trade Allows use of film clips from more then one movie on the same theme In showing entire movie, students may be distracted from the points you want them to discern by trivial elements of the film Advantage of showing the entire film: if you must be absent and are loathe to cancel class outright, showing an entire film may be an excellent alternative The film may cover a number of topics relevant to your class and enhance students understanding of the subject Clips can be difficult to manage

7 Home Viewing as an Option Considerations for out-of-class assignment Pro: Students can watch on their own time Can offer a choice of films on a topic – for example, using a group assignment format, where several students watch the same film and then collaborate on presenting their observations to the rest of the class Con: Teacher not in a position to direct the viewing patterns of students Costs associated with renting/purchase of a video Ownership of necessary equipment (dvd player/viewer) Viewing equipment is available at the Library – both DVD players for single student use as well as small group viewing, and access to computers for online viewing

8 Before Showing the Film As mentioned earlier, it is absolutely necessary to view any films you intend to use before sharing it with students. If the film is rated R, such as Schindlers List, sensitivity to the audience is of utmost importance regardless of the age level of the students. Should a student have a legitimate reason to not view the film, an alternative assignment may be utilized. Films shows for TCC classes should be legally acquired copies – those purchased by the library are purchased under educational use copyright guidelines and are acceptable for classroom viewing or assignments. Issues of U.S. Copyright Law Relating to the use of Movies in the Classroom http://www.teachwithmovies.org/copyright.html http://www.teachwithmovies.org/copyright.html

9 Film Databases @ the Library TCC Library provides over 100 databases accessible 24/7 for students and faculty. Several of the History databases include not only articles and photographs, but video and audio clips among the resources as well. http://www.linccweb.org/index.asp?screen=subject&CID=28 http://www.linccweb.org/index.asp?screen=subject&CID=28 African American Experience (65) American History (350) Pop Culture (204) World History: the Modern Era (219) and History Reference Center (80 hours from the Video Encyclopedia of the 20 th Century) Additionally, two of our databases provide extensive coverage of video materials FMG - Films on Demand: Streaming video from large and small production companies covering a wide range of subjects to enhance college courses. These videos include public performance rights that allow them to be used in the educational setting. FMG Films Media Group, Films for the HumanitiesFilms on Demand American History in Video: Alexander Street Press: Rich collection of video available online for the study of American history, with 2,000 hours and more than 5,000 titles on completion. The collection allows students and researchers to analyze historical events, and the presentation of historical events over time, through commercial and governmental newsreels, archival footage, public affairs footage, and important documentaries.Alexander Street Press Incorporating Library Resources in Blackboard: http://tcc.fl.libguides.com/content.php?pid=295685&sid=2518473 http://tcc.fl.libguides.com/content.php?pid=295685&sid=2518473

10 Resources at the TCC Library Upstaging the Cold War : American dissent and cultural diplomacy, 1940-1960, by Andrew Justin Falk, Univ of Massachusetts Press, Circulation PN 1993.5.U6 F34 2010 World War II on the big screen : 450+ films, 1938-2008, by Doris Milberg, McFarland & Co. Circulation D 743.23.M55 2010 Medieval film, Manchester University Press, Circulation PN 1995.9.M52 M43 2009 History on film reader, Routledge, 2009. Circulation PN 1995.2.H57 2009 History goes to the movies: studying history on film, Marnie Hughes-Warrington, Routledge, 2007. LINCC eResources eBooks The Ancient World in the cinema, Yale Univ Press, LJ Circulation PN1995.9.H5 S6 2001 LJ Why docudrama? : fact-fiction on film and TV, Southern Illinois University Press, Circulation PN 1995.9.H5 W58 1999 Historical Films - - History and Criticism http://www.linccweb.org/catalog?screen=keyword&lib_code=FLCC2800&index=WSU&query=Historical+films+History+and+criticism Middle Ages in Motion Pictures Middle Ages in Motion Pictures - http://www.linccweb.org/catalog?screen=keyword&lib_code=FLCC2800&index=WSU&query=Middle+Ages+in+motion+pictures http://www.linccweb.org/catalog?screen=keyword&lib_code=FLCC2800&index=WSU&query=Middle+Ages+in+motion+pictures Motion Pictures and HistoryMotion Pictures and History - Historical Films – United States – History and CriticismHistorical Films – United States – History and Criticism

11 WWW Resources Teach with Movies: Lesson Plans Based on Movies & Film http://www.teachwithmovies.org/ History & Government: Movies in the Classroom.org http://www.classbrain.com/artmovies/publish/cat_index_8.shtml PBS History Shows http://www.pbs.org/topics/history/ History Channel Videos http://www.history.com/videos Multimedia Seeds: Collections http://www.eduscapes.com/seeds/collections/digital.html http://www.eduscapes.com/seeds/collections/digital.html IMDB: Internet Movie Database http://www.imdb.com/genre/biography http://www.imdb.com/genre/documentary http://www.imdb.com/genre http://www.imdb.com/genre/history http://www.imdb.com/genre/war

12 YouTube as a Resource http://www.youtube.com/education Learn Visit YouTube EDU to find short lessons from top teachers around the world, full courses from the worlds leading universities, professional development material from fellow educators, and inspiring videos from global thought leaders. Learn more.YouTube EDULearn more Teach Use YouTube videos to enrich your classroom lessons. Spark a conversation. Make theoretical concepts come alive. Tap into the mind of the visual learner. See how educators like you are incorporating video into their lessons and join the YouTube Teachers community. Learn more.Learn more

13 References Allocco, Katherine. 2010. "Five Good Reasons to Show "Great Guy" (1936) in Our U.S. History and American Studies Classes (and the Challenges We'll Face)." History Teacher 44, no. 1: 19-33. ERIC, EBSCOhost (accessed November 5, 2012).Five Good Reasons to Show "Great Guy" (1936) in Our U.S. History and American Studies Classes (and the Challenges We'll Face)." D'Sa, B. (2005). Social Studies in the Dark: Using Docudramas to Teach History. Social Studies, 96(1), 9.Social Studies in the Dark: Using Docudramas to Teach History Kelly, T. Mills. 2011. "But Mine's Better": Teaching History in a Remix Culture." History Teacher 44, no. 3:But Mine's Better": Teaching History in a Remix Culture 369-377. Academic Search Complete, EBSCOhost (accessed November 8, 2012). Latz, M. (2009). Purposeful Use of Film within the Classroom: Encouraging Student Engagement. Retrieved Nov 6 th, 2012Purposeful Use of Film within the Classroom: Encouraging Student Engagement from http://nwi.ivytech.edu/web/lcc/presentations/Film.pdfhttp://nwi.ivytech.edu/web/lcc/presentations/Film.pdf Neuhaus, Jessamyn. 2010. "Shake This Square World and Blast off for Kicksville": Teaching History with Post-WWII Prescriptive Classroom Films." History Teacher 44, no. 1: 35-50. ERIC, EBSCOhost (accessed November 5, 2012). Stoddard, Jeremy D., and Alan S. Marcus. 2010. "More than "Showing What Happened": Exploring the Potential of Teaching History with Film." High School Journal 93, no. 2: 83-90. ERIC, EBSCOhost (accessed November 5, 2012).More than "Showing What Happened": Exploring the Potential of Teaching History with Film Weinstein, P. B. (2001). Movies as the Gateway to History: The History and Film Project. History Teacher, 35(1), 27-48.Movies as the Gateway to History: The History and Film Project Further references can be found at http://tcc.fl.libguides.com/docudramashttp://tcc.fl.libguides.com/docudramas

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