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National Response Department Team Coordination Training Initial and Recurrent Training Presentation 08AUG2013.

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Presentation on theme: "National Response Department Team Coordination Training Initial and Recurrent Training Presentation 08AUG2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 National Response Department Team Coordination Training Initial and Recurrent Training Presentation 08AUG2013

2 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate 2 Team Coordination Training Welcome! Completion of this TCT Workshop – Satisfies initial TCT requirement Satisfies 5 year renewal requirement Should be accomplished in about 4 hours Everyone is encouraged to participate!

3 3 Team Coordination Training Introductions Housekeeping Announcements Restroom facilities Breaks Exits Silence Cell Phones Restricted areas (if applicable) Any special needs and instructions Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

4 4 Team Coordination Training According to COMDTINST ,Operational Risk Management (ORM) is something that applies to everyone in the Coast Guard, Active Duty, Reserve, AUX and Civilians. It standardizes and formalizes the Coast Guards ORM policy, and along with it, CRM (for aviators) and TCT (for surface operators.) Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

5 5 So what is Risk Management? Risk Management is the Identification Evaluation & Mitigation of hazards Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

6 So what is Risk Management? In a nutshell – What are the hazards to which we are exposed? What is the probability of a mishap occurring? How severe would it be if it occured? How can we control the risks in order to prevent mishaps and, if possible, still get our job done Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate 6

7 What do those terms mean? Risk: The chance of personal injury or property damage or loss Severity: An events potential consequences in terms of degree of damage, injury, or impact on a mission Probability: The likelihood an individual event will occur Exposure: The amount of time, number of cycles, number of people involved, and/or amount of equipment involved in a given event Mishap: An unplanned single or series of events causing death, injury, occupational illness, or damage to or loss of equipment or property Hazard: Any real or potential condition that can endanger a mission; cause personal injury, illness, or death; or damage equipment or property Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate 7

8 Key Risk Management Principals Accept no unnecessary risk Accept necessary risk only when the benefits outweigh the costs Make risk decisions at the lowest appropriate level Integrate Risk Management into all phases of planning and execution of missions and operations Continuously employ risk management as operations progress and evolve Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate 8

9 Risk Management Risk Assessment may be dismissed by some as justcommon sense Unfortunately, using your common sense is too often an uncommon commodity, just when we need it the most The natural human tendency is to just do it, rather than to stop and think about the risks associated with a certain activity or task 9 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

10 Risk Management It boils down to this: Accidents are caused; therefore, they are preventable As long as we are human, we have the capacity to make errors 10 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

11 Risk Management Human error is the leading cause of mishaps Therefore, the improvement of human performance is essential for mishap prevention TCT is an important tool for improving human performance 11 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

12 Risk Management We will always have risk, but there are ways to reduce that risk TCT is our way to implement Risk Management to reduce risk TCT, plus crew briefing and debriefing will help reduce injuries and mishaps and still let us accomplish our mission 12 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

13 What is TCT ? Team Coordination Training (TCT) is: A Coast Guard training program designed to: Change the way we look at risk Increase Crew / Team effectiveness and safety Reduce potential for human error and accidents 13 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

14 14 Why a Team approach? Team: A group that acts together to accomplish a goal As part of Team Coast Guard we must work together to: Reduce injuries Reduce damage Achieve improved boating safety Everyone in the crew is a member of the Team Everyone in the crew has a stake in the safety of the mission Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

15 Impact of Human Error Human error continues to be the most significant cause of U.S. Coast Guard mishaps 60% to 65% of cutter and boat navigation mishaps have had human error as a contributing cause 15 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

16 Poor judgment (32%), including: Unknown or misunderstood situation Loss of situational awareness Inadequate assessment of risks Incorrect GO / NO-GO decisions Incorrect information in decision making Impact of Human Error 16 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

17 Planning (more than 20%), including: Failure to develop a mission plan Failure to establish a proper lookout Failure to identify hazards Failure to mitigate/control risk Failure to develop a contingency plan ( source: CG Team Coordination Training Student Guide (8/98) Impact of Human Error 17 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

18 Ineffective Supervision (more than 7%) including: Lax enforcement of standards & procedures Inadequate oversight Not verifying job done correctly ( source: CG Team Coordination Training Student Guide (8/98) Impact of Human Error 18 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

19 Team Coordination Training There are no specific statistics about Auxiliary mishaps or casualties Active Duty Coast Guard statistics help us understand the nature and scope of the problem 19 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

20 CG Small Boat Mishap Rate Rate per 100,000 patrol hours 20 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

21 1.Mission Analysis 2.Leadership 3.Communication 4.Assertiveness 5.Decision-Making 6.Adaptability and Flexibility 7.Situational Awareness Seven Elements of TCT TCT stresses seven human factors elements 21 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

22 Group Activity # 1 Your participant guide contains Scenario # 1 Please form yourselves into crews of 3 to 5 Spend a few minutes familiarizing yourselves with the scenario If paper copies of Scenario # 1 are not available, please use the scenario found on the following slides If you have paper copies, please proceed directly to slide # 32 slide # Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

23 Facility: 1963, 36 foot Chris Craft cabin cruiser, twin screw inboard engines, wood construction. Weather: Hot & humid, little wind Coxswain: Jack, 55 year old with 12 years experience with his own 20 foot center console, no experience with facility used in this patrol. Scenario # 1 23 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

24 Crew Continued: Crewmember: Joe, 82 year old retired coxn who offered his 36 footer for use since a heart ailment forced him to drop back to crew status earlier this year. Joe now takes heart medicine that causes an occasional dizzy spell in hot weather. Crewmember: Ed, 64 year old with 4 years experience as an outstanding crewmember and helmsman. Scenario # 1 24 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

25 The patrol is a MOM conducted under orders with communications maintained by the local CG boat station. The coxswain considered this to be a routine patrol that posed no special problems and advised his crew of that finding. During the patrol, a passing boater informs them that they saw a lone fisherman fall off a small skiff after a large wake, caused by a passing party fishing boat, violently rocked his boat. Scenario # 1 25 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

26 Jack is at the helm and proceeds to the location approximately 500 yards away to assess the situation before notifying the CG duty officer. At about 100 yards from the scene, they see a male struggling in the water some 20 yards from a small skiff with no one aboard. Ed immediately yells Man Overboard, points to the port side and yells again, man overboard… 100 yards at 270 degrees relative. Scenario # 1 26 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

27 Jack immediately powers down and begins approaching the PIW (person in the water). Joe goes below and begins rummaging through his cabin, looking for his throwable life ring (several minutes pass), while Jack tries to maneuver the 36 footer closer to the struggling man. As the facility approaches the PIW, Joe finally emerges from the cabin, but seems unsteady and a little pale as he tries to untangle the line attached to the life ring. Scenario # 1 27 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

28 Jack sees Joes difficulty and realizes that Joe cannot heave the ring, nor will he be able to assist retrieving the man from the water due to his weakness and instability on deck. Due to the size & configuration of the large cabin cruiser and his inexperience with this vessel, Jack has been having trouble maneuvering the twin screw vessel close in, without losing sight of the man in the water. He feels helpless to assist with the retrieval. Scenario # 1 28 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

29 Jack then realizes that Joe must take the helm, while he heaves the life ring. Ed waits to help Jack lift the exhausted man from the water. Jack reluctantly orders Joe to the helm, and throws the ring. Ed has stood by since the PIW (person in water) event started, awaiting orders. Scenario # 1 29 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

30 As the PIW grabs onto the ring, Jack notices the facility, still under power, moving further away from the man as he hauls in on the life ring line with the man hanging on. They begin to inadvertently tow the man through the water, which causes the him to lose his grasp on the ring. Jack retrieves the ring and throws it again to the PIW. Scenario # 1 30 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

31 Jack then quickly re-takes the helm from Joe and places the facility in reverse to stop its forward motion and begins to close the gap between PIW & the facility. As the facility comes up to the man, he places both engines into neutral and then leaves the helm to assist Ed in retrieving the man according to proper procedure. They call the CG station and request immediate assistance, unsure of the medical condition of the man just retrieved. Scenario # 1 31 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

32 Group Activity # 1 Now that you have familiarized yourselves with the scenario, refer to the list of 7 elements of TCT. 1.Mission Analysis 2.Leadership 3.Communication 4.Assertiveness 5.Decision-Making 6.Adaptability and Flexibility 7.Situational Awareness Use those elements to complete the rest of this activity. 32 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

33 Group Activity # 1 Tasks 1.Identify each TCT element you can find in the scenario 2.Using a pen or pencil, circle the portion (sentence or paragraph) of the scenario that is directly linked to each of those TCT elements you found 3.Write down any TCT elements that were NOT addressed/found in the scenario 4.As directed by the facilitator, discuss your findings 33 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

34 Group Activity # 1 Tasks 1.Did you find all of these elements in the scenario? 1.Mission Analysis 2.Leadership 3.Communication 4.Assertiveness 5.Decision-Making 6.Adaptability and Flexibility 7.Situational Awareness 2.Were any of these missing? 3.Next, we will look at each of those elements in detail. 34 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

35 Mission Analysis 35 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

36 The process by which Operating and Contingency plans are developed to safely and effectively accomplish the mission. All planning must be preceded by information gathering: weather forecasts crew fitness mission specifics facility checklists other relevant information Mission Analysis 36 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

37 37 Failure to gather accurate and comprehensive information and/or complacency affects the planning process and places mission and crew at risk Contingency planning is critical as Operational plans may change once implemented Changes in weather, mission, crew performance, etc., may require Plan B, Contingency plans Mission Analysis Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

38 Includes: Planning – Was there any, or not so much? Event - Complexity of mission and guidance Assets Crew – Fitness, Selection, Training Facility – Capability for Mission Communications – Internal & External Environment – External conditions, weather, day/night, sea state, other traffic, etc. 38 Mission Analysis Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

39 Operational Risk Management (ORM) is all about Assessing and Mitigating Risk Always conduct a pre mission briefing with all crew members prior to all patrols or missions Together, conduct a risk assessment using the Green- Amber-Red (GAR) Worksheet Continually assess and update the risk assessment throughout the mission with your crew Reassess when ANY key factors change Assessing the Risk 39 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

40 Assessing the Risk Although there are different Risk Assessment tools the GAR worksheet is an accepted way to plan and prepare for any mission Use the Auxiliary GAR worksheet unless your OIA mandates another toolAuxiliary GAR worksheet Remember, Risk Management is whats important; not the numerical values or colors 40 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

41 Assessing the Risk Here is the Auxiliary GAR Risk Calculation Worksheet. Use this tool unless your OIA mandates another. 41 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

42 Assessing the Risk Page two of the GAR Worksheet describes elements which should be considered (PEACE) and provides guidance for Risk Mitigation (STAAR). 42 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

43 Assessing the Risk Operational Risk Management Basics - Accept no unnecessary risk Accept necessary risk only when benefits outweigh costs Make risk decisions at the appropriate level ORM is just as critical in the execution of the mission as in its planning 43 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

44 Group Activity #2 Re-visit Scenario # 1 with Mission Analysis in mind Did you identify all the passage(s) in scenario # 1 linked to Mission Analysis? What did you find that indicate good planning and mission analysis? What did you find that indicate poor planning or mission analysis? What would you, as a crew, have done to improve mission analysis? Discuss when requested by your facilitator 44 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

45 Leadership 45 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

46 Effective Leaders posses Courage, Confidence Competence Leadership is not about just giving orders Effective Leaders find ways to obtain the willing participation of others towards accomplishing a goal Leadership 46 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

47 Leadership Effective leaders earn the respect and confidence of team members Managers give detailed directions to complete tasks by virtue of their rank or position Leaders inspire and motivate others to willingly work together to accomplish the goal regardless of rank or position 47 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

48 Goals must be consistent with the Coast Guards core values and the mission objective Leaders strive to achieve the respect, confidence and loyalty of those under their supervision, regardless of position Leadership 48 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

49 Effective leaders will also: Update the crew on mission progress Balance workload among crew members (prevents overload) Ensure the crew is fully qualified and comfortable with their roles Provides feedback on performance Leadership 49 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

50 Effective leaders Make good decisions in a collaborative, team environment Have the courage to make the right decision, even if unpopular Exhibit confidence based on experience and ability Are competent, well prepared and mission oriented Leadership 50 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

51 Group Activity # 3 Re-visit Scenario # 1 with Leadership in mind Did you identify all the passage(s) from scenario # 1 that are directly linked to Leadership Did the coxswain exhibit good leadership, or was he lacking Identify at least two examples that illustrate your answer to the question above Discuss your findings when requested by your facilitator 51 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

52 Communication 52 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

53 Communication Communication is both verbal and non-verbal (facial expressions, tone, etc.) Although we tend to focus on the words, most communications is non-verbal. 53 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

54 Communication Effective communication is Both verbal and non-verbal Accurate Bold Concise Understood 54 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

55 Communication Leaders and crew members have an equal responsibility to ensure that they convey their thoughts and information effectively The Feedback Loop is a simple method to ensure that our transmissions are heard and understood loud and clear 55 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

56 Communication The Feedback Loop acknowledges all communications by: Repeating the message, Finding a non-verbal way to acknowledge the message depending on the situation. Always ask for feedback or observe behavior to be sure that the message was received 56 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

57 Communication Barriers can develop which degrade or interfere with the quality of our communication. What kinds of barriers may exist on a mission? How can we overcome them? Discuss! 57 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

58 Communication Some Barriers to Communication include: Failure to close the Feedback Loop Distracting background noise such as engine, wind and other physical environmental factors Over-complicating the message. Use the KISS method whenever possible (Keep It Simple, Stupid) Fatigue / Hearing Difficulty Conflicting non-verbal cues 58 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

59 Group Activity # 4 Briefly revisit Scenario 1 As a crew, find at least three examples of communication failures that had an impact on the circumstances in Scenario # 1 Present your crews findings when requested by your facilitator 59 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

60 Assertiveness 60 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

61 Assertiveness Assertiveness: The ability of individual crew members to state and maintain a position that may be unpopular, or counter to a position taken by others, unless (until) convinced by facts and logic, and not based solely on the authority or personality of others. 61 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

62 Assertiveness Be assertive, but not aggressive The aggressive person seeks to bully his/her way though situations for their own ego or self image An assertive person cares about the mission more than themselves and their ego Communicate your concerns, without offending those who disagree 62 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

63 Assertiveness Techniques Ask task related questions Suggest positive alternatives State opinions calmly but firmly. Avoid letting rank/position differences threaten mission or performance Maintain your position until convinced by facts Avoid conflict or personality differences Own your feelings Im concerned. Im uncomfortable. 63 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

64 Group Activity # 5 Re-visit Scenario # 1 with Assertiveness in mind Did you identify all the passage(s) from scenario # 1 linked to assertiveness Use scenario # 1 to identify two examples of crewmember assertiveness Identify two examples of a failure to be assertive when required by circumstances Discuss your when requested by the facilitator 64 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

65 Decision Making 65 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

66 What are the basic steps that might be taken in any decision making process? Discuss! Decision Making 66 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

67 Any generic decision making process includes: 1.Defining a problem or condition 2.Seek relevant information 3.Analyze & verify information 4.Identify range of possible alternatives 5.Select an alternative or range of alternatives 6.Implement and examine the results 7.Adjust our actions according to results Decision Making 67 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

68 Making good decisions is the heart of TCT. Decisions will likely impact the safety of the crew and the success of the mission. The elements of TCT will prepare us to make better decisions The decision making process is a continuous loop of those steps that we repeat throughout the mission. Decision Making 68 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

69 The process can take 20 seconds in the case of routine decisions, or 20 months in the case of large complex problems The process is the same, the depth of analysis and degree of complexity is always changing Decision Making 69 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

70 Re-visit Scenario # 1 with Decision Making in mind Did you identify the passage(s) from scenario # 1 that are directly linked to Decision Making Consider the steps in the Decision Making Process How effectively did Coxswain and crew use the decision making process? Give examples Discuss your findings when requested by the facilitator Group Activity # 6 70 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

71 Adaptability 71 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

72 The ability to react to changes in: environmental conditions mission complexity crew fitness equipment failures, etc. Effective leaders & crews adapt and are open to new information. Adaptability is critical to crew safety. Adaptability 72 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

73 Adaptability is based on maintaining situational awareness so changes are quickly identified and prioritized Leaders do not necessarily have all the answers; they acknowledge that new information, conditions or crew input can change the mission Adaptability 73 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

74 74 Leaders should take advantage of everyones ideas and experience Leaders remain adaptable and flexible to new conditions, ideas and challenges Adaptability Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

75 Adaptability Adaptability means we are open to change Lets take a moment to identify some kinds of new information that could cause us to change our operational plans What sources might provide that new information Discuss! 75 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

76 Group Activity # 7 Re-visit Scenario #1 with Adaptability in mind Did you identify the correct passage(s) from scenario #1 linked to Adaptability Did the crew members exhibit good adaptability skills Did they fail to adapt to changing conditions Give examples of both poor and good adaptability skills Discuss your findings when requested 76 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

77 Situational Awareness 77 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

78 Situational Awareness We must know what is going on around us in order to make good decisions Plans are critical to success, but we must be ready to change our plans based on new information or situations Maintaining situational awareness will decrease the likelihood of poor decision making 78 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

79 Situational Awareness How might we lose our Situational Awareness (SA) Identify as many barriers to maintaining good situational awareness as possible Name some ways to avoid these barriers and correct loss of situational awareness Discuss! 79 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

80 Situational Awareness Barriers to maintaining SA: Confusion or pre-occupation with a task Lethargy, fatigue or loss of focus, inactivity, boredom Complacency Neglect of proper procedure. Environmental Factors, such as: Weather (extreme heat or cold) Engine- droning noise Sea state 80 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

81 Two Challenge Rule If a team member fails to adequately respond to two or more challenges regarding omissions or questionable actions, the individual is assumed to have lost situational awareness. Immediate steps must be taken to re-establish a healthy, alert environment on board the facility. Situational Awareness 81 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

82 Situational Awareness Loss of Situational Awareness may be prevented by: Including the crew in the initial mission analysis Rotating watches on a regular basis Conducting training exercises such as MOB & line throwing evolutions, or checklist activities Varying the speed and direction of the vessel or aircraft when possible 82 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

83 Re-visit Scenario # 1 with SA in mind Did you identify the passage(s) from scenario # 1 linked to Situational Awareness Discuss each crew member to decide if they lost situational awareness If you find that a crewmember did lose situational awareness, identify the circumstance and list way to reverse that loss Discuss your findings when requested. Group Activity # 8 83 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

84 The GAR Model 84 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

85 The GAR Model Lets review the GAR Worksheet – Its an accepted Risk Assessment / Management Tool Its not a silver bullet, it helps focus our thinking It helps us identify hazards, evaluate the risk they present and reduce them to acceptable levels Risk Assessment is a Team Sport 85 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

86 GAR Green-Amber-Red Model (Generic Concept) What are the hazards, what level of risk do they present? Is that level of risk acceptable by the unit? GREEN GREEN Yes, risks are acceptable AMBER AMBER Maybe, but only if risks are managed correctly RED RED NO, risks are beyond acceptable limits 86 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

87 The GAR Model RISK ELEMENTS TO CONSIDER SUPERVISION : Qualifications / experience of leader / crew & amount of supervision / communications needed PLANNING : Information & details available / time for planning / asset selection TEAM SELECTION : Qualifications & experience of team members TEAM FITNESS : Physical & mental state ENVIRONMENT : Weather (winds, temp. visibility) / Seas (state, current) / Traffic / Illumination (day, night) EVENT/EVOLUTION COMPLEXITY : Time required &difficulty of the mission 87 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

88 Give PEACE a Chance! PLANNING – Was there any, or not so much? EVENT - Complexity of mission and guidance ASSETS Crew – Fitness, Selection, Training Facility – Capability for Mission COMMUNICATIONS – Internal & External ENVIRONMENT – External conditions, weather, day/night, sea state, other traffic, etc. 88 The GAR Model Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

89 The GAR Model QUANTIFYING RISK Value is assigned to each element The larger the number, the greater the risk 0 = No or Low Risk, 10 = High or Catastrophic Risk Add individual values to determine total risk score Is there ever zero risk? 89 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

90 The GAR Model 1.Supervision 2.Planning 3.Crew Selection 4.Crew Fitness 5.Environment 6.Event Complexity 0 being low or no risk 10 being high or catastrophic Is there ever zero risk? Rate 0-10 TOTAL Where does this number fall on the GAR color code scale? NOTE: Zero and One should be VERY, VERY rare on any score card! 90 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

91 Controlling Risk Using the STAAR Model – to eliminate or reduce to an acceptable level. S – Spread out – Disperse the risk. Can other assets help? T – Transfer – Is another unit more suitable? A – Avoid – Circumvent hazard: Wait for risk to subside (Weather / illumination improvement) A – Accept – Only if benefit outweighs the cost & w/ continuous reevaluation of risk. R – Reduce - Reduce or limit risk exposure, use additional PPE, additional communications, more experienced crew. 91 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

92 The GAR Model GREEN (Low Risk) 3040 AMBER(Caution)50+RED (High Risk) Color Coding the Total Level of Risk Although the Risk scale starts at Zero, is there ever Zero Risk? Discuss! 92 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

93 The GAR Model Key Elements of G A R analysis: Involve the entire crew as individuals in the scoring process. Avoid group voice votes Begin with the least experienced crew member to avoid pressure from more experienced members Avoid canned or pre-determined scores Score based on current conditions, not habit Be honest with each other 93 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

94 GAR Model Exercise Your Tasking – Use Mission Scenario # 2 Use the GAR Worksheet to complete Risk Assessments as instructed, based on Scenario # 2 You will complete a Pre-Mission GAR, then will re- evaluate as the mission progresses, so follow the instructions of the Facilitator Remember that the 7 elements of TCT must be your guide to completing the GAR Share your crew results when requested 94 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

95 GAR Model Exercise 95 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

96 GAR Model Exercise As before, remain organized into crews of 3 to 5 participants If you have printed copies of the scenario, skip the scenario slides Have a recorder take notes for your crew Share your notes when requested Scenario # 2 is divided into Part A and Part B Read ONLY Part A of the scenario now If you have paper copies click here to skip to Slide 104click here to skip to Slide Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

97 Scenario # 2 Part A Safety and Crowd Control Mission: Fireworks display – Routine Facility: # AUX ; a 24 foot walk around cuddy cabin, 175 HP outboard 97Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

98 Scenario # 2 Part A CREW Coxswain: Ed - 14 years experience as boatcrew, 10 of those years as coxswain. Crew #1: Bill - 7 years experience, some medical history includes loss of night vision, and high blood pressure. Crew #2: Howard – 3 months experience, 1 st night mission. Crew #3: Doris - 15 years experience, history of broken hip within the last year. 98 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

99 Scenario # 2 Part A Weather: 93F and hazy wind: W at 5 mph Humidity: 82% 60 % Chance of T-storms predicted after 9PM Venue: Fireworks barge; Mississippi River, St. Louis Mo. 99Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

100 Scenario # 2 Part A Mission: This Auxiliary facility was assigned to assist in maintaining safety during a July 4 th fireworks display on the river that normally draws over 150 recreational spectator boats to the fireworks area located in St. Louis. Three Auxiliary vessels and one A/D CG 25 footer were tasked with securing a safe perimeter around the fireworks barge so that recreational boaters are kept at a safe distance. 100Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

101 Scenario # 2 Part A Mission Continued: After the fireworks, at about 2200 hrs, the AUX crews were to help with traffic control on the river as a large number of vessels attempt to leave the area all at once, at night. This mass egress has caused minor collisions in the past; drinking on the part of a few boaters has added to the problem in previous years. 101Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

102 Scenario # 2 Part A Story: Four hours prior to getting underway, Ed quickly fills out the GAR; he is confident he and his crew can handle this mission with ease and he looks forward to watching a great display. 102 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

103 Scenario # 2 Part A Underway at 2000 hours, Ed, contacts the duty officer at the CG Small Boat Station on the CG working channel 23A The noise of the boat and the lively conversations of the crew, plus the stormy weather in the area make the radio difficult to hear After several attempts, the watch stander at the Station instructs Ed, When on station, contact PATCOM on channel 81Alpha 103 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

104 GAR Model Exercise Use the GAR scoring sheet to complete an analysis of potential risk based on the information contained in Part A of Scenario # 2 Should the mission proceed as currently described? Are some operational plan and/or contingency plan changes needed? Should the mission be canceled? Be prepared to defend your decisions with examples When prompted by the Facilitator, share your pre-underway GAR Score Sheet with the facilitator and other crews 104 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

105 GAR Model Exercise Proceed to Scenario # 2 Part B Become familiar with the facts and circumstances found in Part B If you have printed copies of the scenario, skip the scenario slidesskip the scenario slides 105 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

106 Scenario # 2 Part B At 2000 hrs, the facility arrives at their designated station on the river on the east side of the perimeter. The coxswain begins patrolling his area on the east side of the perimeter, between the barge and the anchorage area for spectators. Once the boats in the front row of the observation area have anchored, they stand off to the side, within their assigned post and monitor the situation as darkness began to fall at 2100 hrs. 106Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

107 Scenario # 2 Part B At 2145 hrs, another facility,AUX 36454, arrives on scene. The Coxn shouts…Hey, you guys! Is your radio broken? PATCOM has been trying to reach you for over an hour! As Ed listens to the crew of the 36454, it sank in that the instructions from the station (which he didnt hear very well) were to contact PATCOM on another channel. He had not been in contact since 2000 hours. Ed and crew all realize that they should be embarrassed that a SAR case had almost been initiated because of their disappearing act…but no harm done he smiles to his crew. 107 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

108 Scenario # 2 Part B Ed assures the AUX that they were all OK. He contacts the PATCOM by phone and confesses the mistake. The fireworks display was just beginning at 2200 hrs. when he notices that Doris was unusually quiet and seemed detached from the others who were watching the fireworks. Ed shrugs this off and continues watching the display; he tunes his marine radio to channel 81 Alpha as the fireworks become even louder & lightning in the area is causing static on the radio. 108 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

109 GAR Model Exercise Discuss the circumstances of the mission among your crew Should this crew return their pre-mission GAR worksheet to adjust or alter the scores Does the information in Part B not warrant any changes in the the pre-mission GAR Worksheet or in the mission plans Whatever your crew decides, be prepared to defend your decisions to the group When prompted by the Facilitator, share your Part B GAR Worksheet results and subsequent decisions/actions with the group 109 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

110 Scenario # 2 - EPILOGUE As the fireworks explode, Coxswain Ed has a nagging feeling that something isnt right. Still stung by the embarrassing communications error, it finally dawns on him that he may have lost Situational Awareness. He asks Doris if she is OK. Doris replies that she has some unexpected pain in her bum hip and that it is really bothering her. As flashes of lightning add to the fireworks, Ed sees the light. He finally thinks about his GAR score and decides that its about time to re- evaluate the mission. Hey, crew!, he yells. Lets take a look at our GAR. Maybe we need to rethink this! 110 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

111 TCT Review Operational Risk Management (ORM) asks: –What is out there that can hurt me –How do I keep it from hurting me and still get my job done ORM can be a simple system of common sense procedures, or it can be complex for large scale operations The ultimate goal however is the same –Reduce Mishaps, Injuries and Damage –Meet Mission Objectives 111 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

112 TCT is a Risk Management process TCT is includes these 7 Human Factors Mission Analysis Leadership Communication Assertiveness Decision-Making Adaptability and Flexibility Situational Awareness TCT Review 112 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

113 TCT Review We use Risk Assessment tools including the Green-Amber-Red (GAR) Model to help us evaluate our risk exposure We also use the GAR Model to help us quantify the severity of those risks – For any GAR item above 5, use STAAR to mitigate. Once we understand the risks, including the severity and consequences of those risks We must make good decisions to accept, eliminate or reduce those risks to acceptable levels in order to keep everyone safe and accomplish out mission If we cannot reduce the risk to acceptable levels, we must be prepared to end our mission Safety has priority over mission accomplishment 113 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

114 Team Coordination Training Questions or Comments, Please (Remember Assertiveness!) 114 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate

115 Thank You Thank you for your participation in Team Coordination Training. Please share your thoughts about this training with us! Send your comments to: Chief, Operations Projects and Educational Outreach Division Jim McCarty, DVC-RS Bruce Pugh, DVC-RE Gary Taylor, DIR-Rd Bob Shafer, DIR-R 115 Team Coordination Training – Initial & Recurrent Response Directorate


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