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Presentation on theme: "All material in this presentation, including text and images, is the property of Noel-Levitz, LLC. Permission is required to reproduce information. Gary."— Presentation transcript:

1 All material in this presentation, including text and images, is the property of Noel-Levitz, LLC. Permission is required to reproduce information. Gary L. Fretwell Senior Vice President and Principal

2 May you live in interesting times! It is reported that it was the first of three curses of increasing severity, the other two being: –May you come to the attention of those in authority –May you find what you are looking for

3 1. Why Plan? 2. Strategic Enrollment Planning Overview 3. Creating the Organizational Structures 4. Characteristics of a Successful Strategic Enrollment Plan

4 1 Why Plan?

5 The future is embedded in the present. – John Naisbitt

6 Number of colleges and universities, 2012-13 © Copyright 2012, The Chronicle of Higher Education. Reprinted with permission. This material may not be posted, published, or distributed without permission from The Chronicle. shis material may not be posted, published, or distributed with permission from The Chronicle.

7 Projected change in numbers of new high school graduates 2011-12 to 2021-22 © Copyright 2011, The Chronicle of Higher Education. Reprinted with permission. This material may not be posted, published, or distributed without permission from The Chronicle.

8 Median cost to recruit a single student © 2011 Noel-Levitz, Inc. 2011 Cost of Recruiting an Undergraduate Student: Benchmarks for Four-Year and Two-Year Institutions *Limited sample size for this sector.

9 Average net revenue per freshman, 2000-2012 (tuition, fees, room, and board) © 2013. Noel-Levitz, Inc. 2013 Discounting Report

10 Overall satisfaction across traditional institution types percent satisfied or very satisfied © 2012, Noel-Levitz, Inc. 2012 Noel-Levitz National Student Satisfaction and Priorities Results

11 Early 19th century: the colonial colleges were joined by several hundred more religiously founded institutions. Mid-19th century: the rise of public colleges, culminating in the Morrill Act of 1862. Early 20th century: the emergence of the modern research university; the articulation of the Wisconsin Idea, that public universities should serve the public; and the appearance of extension services. The 1960s: the transformation of normal schools into comprehensive universities; the rapid proliferation of community colleges; the end of legal segregation in higher education; and sharply increased federal aid to colleges and universities. Profound transformations have reshaped the higher-education landscape in roughly 50-year intervals. © Copyright 2013, Steven Mintz, Executive Director of the University of Texas systems Institute for Transformational Learning; Commentary printed in The Chronicle of Higher Education, July 22, 2013. Reprinted with permission. This material may not be posted, published, or distributed without permission from Steven Mintz.

12 We are in the midst of another higher-education revolution

13 Many of the forces affecting colleges are well known Economic, as various revenue streams lag behind rising costs;Economic, as various revenue streams lag behind rising costs; Demographic, as colleges enroll more part-time and nontraditional students who struggle with financial challenges, disabilities, inadequate preparation, and work-family stresses; andDemographic, as colleges enroll more part-time and nontraditional students who struggle with financial challenges, disabilities, inadequate preparation, and work-family stresses; and Market-driven, as for-profit and aggressive nonprofit institutions compete for the most rapidly growing student sector, working adults.Market-driven, as for-profit and aggressive nonprofit institutions compete for the most rapidly growing student sector, working adults.

14 As The Chronicle's Jeff Selingo has suggested, an equally serious challenge is ideological Now regarded as a private rather than a public good, higher education must address a host of criticisms: That graduation rates are too low,That graduation rates are too low, That levels of student engagement and learning outcomes are unacceptable, andThat levels of student engagement and learning outcomes are unacceptable, and That a college education does not provide good value for the money.That a college education does not provide good value for the money.

15 The most important challenge involves a shift in the way students consume higher education Instead of attending a single institution, students receive credit in multiple ways, including from early- college/dual-degree programs, community colleges, online providers, and multiple universities. Students are voting with their feet, embracing online courses and undermining core curricula, which served as a cash cow, by turning to alternate providers, and pursuing fewer majors that require study of a foreign language.

16 Colleges must become more nimble, entrepreneurial, student-focused, and accountable for what students learn Steven Mintz makes these predictions for 15 innovations that will alter the face of higher education in the next 3 years: 1.E-Advising 2.Evidence-based pedagogy 3.Decline of the lone-eagle teaching approach 4.Optimized class time 5.Easier educational transitions 6.Fewer large lecture classes 7.New frontiers for e-learning 8.Personalized adaptive learning 9.Increased competency-based and prior-learning credits 10.Data-driven instruction 11.Aggressive pursuit of new revenue 12.Online and low-residency degrees at flagships 13.More certificates and badges 14.Free and open textbooks 15.Public-private partnerships

17 These changes are already provoking a great deal of anxiety and alarm There is a danger that higher education will become even more stratified and bifurcated than it already is. The fear is that less-well-financed institutions will displace faculty with low-quality correspondence courses and forms of machine learning that poorly serve at-risk students. The next three years hold out the prospect of transforming the higher-education experience in positive ways.

18 Public higher education will change fundamentally, whether we like it or not

19 "The key to success in the 21st century is alignment; Staying in alignment with a world that will be characterized by complexity, diversity, and pace of change." - Ed Barlow, Futurist -

20 What will be necessary to change in our enrollment processes, priorities, and systems to achieve our enrollment goals and respond to the institutional strategic plan within an ever-changing environment?

21 Technological Resources Fiscal Resources Human Resources Planning allows us to answer the question: How can we better plan to effectively use our limited resources?

22 2 Strategic Enrollment Planning Overview

23 © 2012 Noel-Levitz, Inc.

24 Strategic planning = Align organization with its environment to promote stability, sustainability, growth, and/or excellence Traditional planning = Set goals then develop steps to achieve those goals

25 Institutional Strategic Enrollment Planning Alignment Strategic plan MissionVision Institutional Effectiveness Strategic Enrollment Plan KPIStrategies Enrollment Goals Annual Plans MarketingRecruitment Success and Completion (PPRC/G)

26 Copyright Noel-Levitz, Inc. Strategic Enrollment Planning

27 Strategic Enrollment Planning … Involves the campus in identifying, prioritizing, implementing, evaluating, and modifying enrollment strategies and goals within a changing environment in order to effectively and efficiently : Realize the institutions mission and vision, and Support the institutions capabilities to recruit and maximally serve students currently and in the future. How does the strategic enrollment planning model differ from the traditional planning model?

28 Communication is key to success Preparation Data Collection Key Performance Indicators Situation Analysis Phase One: Data Analysis Strategy Development Tactics Identified Strategy Prioritization Phase Two: Strategies ROI Considerations Enrollment Projection Goal Setting Finalize Written Plan Phase Three Enrollment Goals Implementation of Plan Form Strategic EM Council Phase Four: Implementation Step by Step Approach

29 Competition, market demand, and institutional strength Market Demand: What students want - Relevance Program: What we do best - Authenticity Competition: Unoccupied market positions - Differentiation

30 Key Performance Indicators EnrollmentExternal Market demand SelectivityDiversityTrue Capacity Pricing and Net Costs Persistence & Graduation Experience & Engagement Data Types

31 KPIs are often the most complex, reflecting strategic actions that take considerable time to evolve Example KPI: Full Time Undergraduate Headcount Graduating Seniors New FY and Transfer FT UG Headcount Attrition Funnel rates Selectivity Reputation Demographics Market share Discount rate Placement rate: Grad and Prof. Sch. Student loan debt Job placement rate Overall satisfaction 4,5,6-yr. grad. rates NSSE scores First-year, So, Jr. Sr. rates Minority, High revenue, Athletes, etc. Student: teacher ratio Avg. class size Net. $$ per student Net tuition per student

32 What is your desired future state? Shape class Current market penetration Competition analysis Goals: Increase SAT/ACT to 1200 Increase first-to-second year retention to 82% Increase grad rate to 60% Increase new students DemographicsAcademic offeringsPrice sensitivity Goals: Increase new student class by 3% per year Increase transfer class by 5% per year Increase new and graduate more students Program delivery stylesCo-curricular offerings Goals: Increase new students by 5% every other year Increase second-to-third year rate to 75%

33 Evaluating the economics of programs – strategic response Manage Grow or Build Reduce or Eliminate Start Enrollment as % of Capacity Net Operating Income Per Student

34 Evaluating the economics of programs Enrollment as % of Capacity Net Operating Income Per Student High, High Low, HighLow, Low High, Low

35 Enrollment Growth Strategy Matrix Market Penetration Program Development Market Development Diversification Existing Programs/Services New Programs/Services Existing Markets New Markets

36 Systems Approach Web Analytics Name Purchase Social Media Integration Integrated CRM E-Comm. Flows Financial Aid Leveraging Curricular Offering Co- Curricular Offerings Retention Prediction

37 Funnel Management Enrollment Stage Rate Enrollment Stage Applicant Prospect Inquiry Completed Applicant Accepted Confirmed Enrolled Response Conversion Completion Acceptance Confirmation Capture Yield (accept to enroll)

38 Return on Investment Strategy Analysis Time/staff/technology needs to implement Expected level of strategy impact Priority to accomplishing enrollment projection Campus Readiness Availability of staff or technical resources to implement Funding available Campus understanding of need for change Return on investment Projected outcomes occurred Review of actual cost to implement

39 Sample Table of Contents for the finalized SEP plan Introduction and Executive Summary Organizational Structure for Planning and Foci Situation Analysis Mission, Vision, Key Performance Indicators, Planning Assumptions Strategies and Priorities for Action Enrollment Goals, Projections, and Return on Investments Future Structure to Monitor Enrollment Management Summary

40 3 Creating the Organizational Structures

41 Leadership Matters

42 Active Planning Broad Participation LeadershipCommunicationRight People Grounded in Data InternalCURRENTExternal Leadership Engagement Agreement on ProcessPlanning Context

43

44 Strategic Enrollment Planning Council (SEPC) Goals Assesses progress toward goal obtainment KPI Monitors KPIs (not necessarily PIs) Strategy Implementation Sets priorities and budget dollars linked to priorities to accomplish goals

45 1.President/Provost/VPAA 2.Chief Financial Officer 3.Director of Institutional Research 4.Faculty Leadership (multiple people) 5.Director of Marketing/Communications 6.Vice President for Student Life 7.Vice President for Enrollment Management Maybe: Director of Athletics Director of Admissions Director of Financial Aid Registrar Director of Housing Strategic Enrollment Planning Council (Get-it-done, high-level team!)

46

47 1.Vice President for Enrollment Management or AVP EM 2.Academic Leadership 3.Vice President for Student Success 4.Director of Marketing/Communications 5.Director of Admissions 6.Director of Retention/Student Success 7.Faculty 8.Director of Financial Aid 9.Institutional Research 10.Student Reps Maybe: Director of Athletics Registrar Director of Housing Action/Steering Committee (Get-it-done, coordinating team!)

48 Lead person (or co-lead) who works well with others, has a passion for topic, and can be the go-between for the SEP councilLead person (or co-lead) who works well with others, has a passion for topic, and can be the go-between for the SEP council Working group members who are prepared to workWorking group members who are prepared to work Include representation to gather buy-inInclude representation to gather buy-in Likely should lead a working groupLikely should lead a working group Action/Steering Committee

49 1.Assessing a changing environment 2.Academic and co-curricular program planning 3.Net operating revenues and expenses 4.Pricing 5.Financial aid policies 6.Shaping the student profile 7.Student retention 8.Enrollment management effectiveness Define Project Scope

50 Review and collate dataReview and collate data Analyze dataAnalyze data Draft situation analysisDraft situation analysis Determine working groups fociDetermine working groups foci Ensure working groups meet and collaborateEnsure working groups meet and collaborate Identify prioritiesIdentify priorities Make recommendations to councilMake recommendations to council Write the planWrite the plan Action Items for Action/Steering Group

51

52 Focus area situation analysesFocus area situation analyses Ensure focus remains connected toward supporting strong academic outcomesEnsure focus remains connected toward supporting strong academic outcomes Strengthen the college/university through providing strategic direction that is data- informedStrengthen the college/university through providing strategic direction that is data- informed Strategy ideationStrategy ideation Unify approach and vision of enrollment managementUnify approach and vision of enrollment management Remain data-informed and seek ways to further enhance and integrate data and data collection into the planning processesRemain data-informed and seek ways to further enhance and integrate data and data collection into the planning processes Maintain enrollment and seek to maximize your profileMaintain enrollment and seek to maximize your profile Diversify your campus profileDiversify your campus profile Provide long-term, practical, and tangible business/action plans that are executableProvide long-term, practical, and tangible business/action plans that are executable Working Group Activities Focus

53 SEP Priorities Long-range Enrollment Academic and Co-curricular Model Enrollment Projecting Strategic Plan

54 4 Characteristics of a Successful Strategic Enrollment Plan

55 Funnel Management by Subpopulation

56 Strong Institutional Buy-in

57 Data-Informed

58 Data-themed SWOT Analysis

59 Creates a Sense of Urgency

60 Provide Planning Assumptions

61 Defined Populations

62 Goal, Objectives, and Action Strategies Goals

63 A solid resource/fiscal plan to support each strategy, goal, and objective

64 Living Plan

65


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