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Academic Counseling and Registration Session for 13 th Platoon Advisors: – Associate Professor Paul Miller, Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering (Group.

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Presentation on theme: "Academic Counseling and Registration Session for 13 th Platoon Advisors: – Associate Professor Paul Miller, Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering (Group."— Presentation transcript:

1 Academic Counseling and Registration Session for 13 th Platoon Advisors: – Associate Professor Paul Miller, Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering (Group 1) – Associate Professor Catherine ONeil – Language Studies (Group 3) Goals for this Session (first of two before classes start) – Intros, course choices, validations, academic opportunities

2 ACR Session Validation questions for department representatives - 1425-1445 Plebe Academic Advising Sheet – Varsity Sports – time commitment – ECA – typically less time commitment – Majors – Engineering, Math/Science, Hum/SS or more specific, e.g. Russian, Aero

3 USNA Academics Similar to civilian schools, same accreditation, similar academic workload and difficulty to Ivy League schools, fewer hours available to study, so more challenging… But, more resources available! The trick is time management!

4 Validations and Credit Hours Due to a high exam score or grade (AP, placement, transcript) you may opt to not take that course if it is required in your major matrix. You may still take it and get credit. You still need to have at least 15 credits/semester and 139-145 credits to graduate. Credits are abbreviated as Lecture Hours-Lab Hours- Credit Hours per week (e.g. 3-0-3 or 2-2-3 or 3-2-4 or…)

5 TYPICAL PLEBE YEAR FALLSPRING SM121 4 CR Calculus I SM122 4 CR Calculus II SC111 4 CR Chemistry I SC112 4 CR Chemistry II HE111 3 CR English I HE112 3 CR English II FP130 3 CR U.S. Government HH104 3 CR U.S. Naval History NS101 2 CR Seamanship NN101 2 CR Intro to Navigation NL110 2 CR Prepare to Lead NL110 2 CR Prepare to Lead PE101/PE111 0 CR Physical Education PE102 0 CR Physical Education 18/16 Credit Hours

6 MATHEMATICS (SM) FALLSPRING SM005 4-1-4 Pre-Calculus Mathematics SM121A 4-1-4 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I SM121A 4-1-4 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I with Trigonometry SM122A 4-1-4 Calculus & Analytic Geometry II with Laboratory Study Period SM121 4-0-4 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I SM122 4-0-4 Calculus & Analytic Geometry II SM131 3-0-3 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I SM122 4-0-4 Calculus & Analytic Geometry II SM161 5-0-5 Calculus I with Computers SM162 5-0-5 Calculus II with Computers SM122 4-0-4 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II SM221 4-0-4 Calculus III with Vector Fields SM221P 4-0-4 Calculus III with Vector Fields (Plebes Only) SM212P 4-0-4 Differential Equations (Plebes Only)

7 Chemistry (SC) FALLSPRING SC111 3-2-4 Foundations of Chemistry I SC112 3-2-4 Foundations of Chemistry II SC151 3-2-4 Modern Chemistry (Course for One Semester Validators) No Specific Follow-On Course Possibilities Are: HH215P, FP210, FP220, FP230, HE217, FE210M, FE210, SI204, SP211P, FL___

8 ENGLISH (HE) FALLSPRING HE101 3-0-3 Practical Writing HE111W 3-0-3 Rhetoric and Intro to Literature I HE111 3-0-3 Rhetoric and Intro to Literature I HE112 3-0-3 Rhetoric and Intro to Literature II HE111S 3-0-3 Rhetoric and Intro to Literature I (Honors course for those who almost validate) HE112S 3-0-3 Rhetoric and Intro to Literature II (Follow-On Course to HE111S) HE112V 3-0-3 Rhetoric and Intro to Literature II (Course for One Semester Validators) No Specific Follow-On Course Possibilities Are: HH215P, FP210, FP220, FP230, HE217, FE210M, FE210, SI204, FL___

9 LEADERSHIP, ETHICS, LAW (NL) SEAMANSHIP, NAVIGATION (NS/NN) POLITICAL SCIENCE (FP) HISTORY (HH) FALLSPRING NL110 2-0-2 Approximately Half the Plebe Class Prepare to Lead NL110 2-0-2 Approximately Half the Plebe Class Prepare to Lead NS101 1-2-2 Seamanship NN101 1-2-2 Intro to Navigation FP130 3-0-3 U. S. Government and Constitutional Development HH104 3-0-3 American Naval History

10 FIRST SEMESTER COURSES - CLASS OF 2014 Most of the courses that a plebe is likely to encounter in his/her first semester at the Naval Academy are described in the following list. Department or Division Course Number Credit Course Description MathematicsSM005 4-1-4Pre-calculus Mathematics. A pre-calculus course for those who need more preparation in algebra and trigonometry. Summer school is required. SM005 counts as a free elective (in matrices where there is a free elective). SM121A 4-1-4Calculus and Analytic Geometry with Trigonometry I. A first calculus course for those who have not had a significant amount of calculus. An extra hour is added for reinforcement in trigonometry. SM121 4-0-4Calculus and Analytic Geometry I. A first calculus course for those who have not had a significant amount of calculus and have a good background in pre-calculus mathematics. SM131 3-0-3Calculus and Analytic Geometry I. A first calculus course for those who have had a significant amount of calculus and prior differential calculus skills and almost validated one semester of calculus. SM161 5-0-5Calculus and Analytic Geometry I with Computers. A first calculus course which integrates calculus and computer programming. Completion of SM161 and SM162 count as a free elective (in matrices where there is a free elective). SM122 4-0-4Calculus and Analytic Geometry II. A second calculus course for one semester validators. SM122S 4-0-4Calculus and Analytic Geometry II. A second calculus course for one semester validators with particularly good mathematic skills.

11 Department or Division Course Number Credit Course Description Mathematics (Cont) SM221P 4-0-4Calculus and Analytic Geometry III. A third calculus course for two semester validators. SM212 Or SM222 4-0-4 Differential equations. Required of majors in most technical disciplines. Differential equations with matrices. Intended for mathematics and quantitative economics majors. SM481 1-0-1Mathematics Problem Solving. This one credit course is for plebe volunteers with an extensive mathematical background. ChemistrySC111 3-2-4Foundations of Chemistry I. A first college level course in chemistry. SC151 3-2-4Modern Chemistry. A one semester course which satisfies the plebe chemistry requirements for those who are well prepared in chemistry but are unable to validate for a full year. PhysicsSP211 3-2-4General Physics. A first college-level course in physics. SP221 3-2-4Physical Mechanics. A first college-level calculus-based physics course. Primarily for physics majors and others seeking a deeper understanding. EnglishHE101 3-0-3Practical Writing. For those whose writing skills need reinforcement prior to taking HE111W & HE112W. HE111 3-0-3Rhetoric and Introduction to Literature I. Stresses writing of rhetorically effective and grammatically correct expository prose. Reading includes essays, short stories, and plays. First Semester Courses - Class of 2014 Continued

12 Department or Division Course Number Credit Course Description English (cont)HE111S 3-0-3Rhetoric and Introduction to Literature I. An honors level course for those who have well-developed writing skills. HE112V 3-0-3Rhetoric and Introduction to Literature II. A continuation of HE111 for one semester validators. Readings include novels and poetry. HistoryHH104 3-0-3 HH104X 3-0-3 American Naval History. The history of American sea power Same course for International Plebes fall semester. Political ScienceFP130 3-0-3U.S. Government and Constitutional Development. A study of American democracy and the structure and function of its government and the Constitution that midshipmen take an oath to defend. FP130X 3-0-3 Only offered spring semester The basic concepts of American democracy and the Constitution placed in comparative context for midshipmen from foreign countries. LeadershipNL110 2-0-2Preparing to Lead. An introduction to the fundamentals of self-leadership, in the context of theories and principles of individual and group leadership. SeamanshipNS101 1-2-2Fundamentals of Seamanship. Provides basic maritime background in general ship characteristics, ship handling and Rules of the Road. Includes at-sea labs on YPs. Languages & Cultures FLXXX 3-0-3Here is to be found a large collection of courses in Arabic (FA), Chinese (FC), French (FF), German (FG), Japanese (FJ), Russian (FR), and Spanish (FS), from the beginning level to advanced readings in literature for foreign cultures. FX101 3-0-3English for non-native speakers. This core course for foreign midshipmen replaces HE111. The course emphasizes writing and American culture and values. First Semester Courses - Class of 2014 Continued

13 Fall Semester CourseSpring Semester CourseSummer School SM005 SM121AYes SM121A SM122A SM121SM122 SM131SM122 SM161SM162 SM122SM221 SM122SSM221S SM221PSM212P (Preferred) SM212 or SM222No Follow-On Course SM481 (Math Problem Solving)No Follow-On Course SC111SC112 SC151HH215P (Preferred) or HE217, FP210, FP220, FP230, FE201M, FE210, SI204/SP211P, FL___ HE101HE111WNo HE111HE112 HE111SHE112S FX101FX102 HE112VHH215P (Preferred) or HE217, FP210, FP220, FP230, FE201M, FE210, SI204, FL___ FP130HH104 HH104X FP130 FP130X NL110NL110 (Approximately Half the Class Each Semester) NS101NN101 FLXXX PE101PE102 PE111PE102 PRE-REGISTRATION 2014

14 Questions? Talk to Squad Leader if urgent (validations, course selection) and ask them to get you in contact with us. Or, see you in a week! Stay cool!

15 Academic Adivising Session for 13 th Platoon Advisors: – Associate Professor Paul Miller, Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering (Group 1) – Associate Professor Catherine ONeil – Language Studies (Group 3)

16 Goals for Today Learn your fall semester schedules Introduce Plebe Academic Handbook Discuss academic expectations Review strategies for academic success Discuss where to go for help Questions

17 MIDS

18 What can I use MIDS for? Pre-register and register for classes Get your class schedule Get your professors schedules Get final exam schedule Query grades and other academic info Provide excusals for absences Compare matrices for majors Read MAPRs … and more!

19 Getting your Schedule

20 Your Schedule May say STAFF Lab Time Class Time Class Roo m Lab Roo m No scheduled classes

21 Schedule Codes Days of the Week –M = Monday –T = Tuesday –W = Wednesday –R = Thursday –F = Friday Buildings –CH = Chauvenet –LJ = Lejeune –LU = Luce –MD = Macdonough –MA = Mahan –MI = Michelson –MU = Maury –NI = Nimitz –RI = Rickover –SA = Sampson

22 Sampson Hall (English, History) Sampson Hall (English, History) Michelson Hall (Chemistry) Michelson Hall (Chemistry) Chauvenet Hall (Math) Chauvenet Hall (Math) Luce Hall (Leadership, Seamanship) Luce Hall (Leadership, Seamanship)

23 Daily Schedule Period Duration 1 0755-0845 2 0855-0945 3 0955-1045 4 1055-1145 5 1330-1420 6 1430-1520 71530-1620 8 0755-0910 9 0955-1110 10 1330-1445 Normal Academi c Day 75 min periods 2 = 3 hrs/wk Seldom used (some long labs)

24 Weekly Calendar View

25 Caution Schedules can change right up to the first day of classes. Use MIDS to check on your schedule just before classes begin.

26 Questions about Schedules? In what building do Math classes meet? In what building do English classes meet? What is one of your 3-hour courses? What is one of your 4-hour courses? How many open periods do you have in a week?

27

28 Help available! Info available!

29

30 Plebe Academic Handbook Academic Calendar, inside front cover –Preregistration, 14 – 18 Sep –Academic Reserve (Exam) Periods –6 and 12 week grade submission dates –Registration 23, Nov – 12 Dec Academic departments, locations and phone numbers, pgs. 2 – 3 Validation, pg. 7 Help with academic problems, pgs. 7 – 9

31 Plebe Academic Handbook Computers, pgs. 11 – 14 –Using MIDS –Getting help or getting it fixed Attendance Requirements, pg. 16 Computation of Grades, pg. 16 Academic Honors, Deficiencies, Academic Board, Special Opportunities pgs. 17 – 22 USNA Statement on Plagiarism, pg. 23

32 How are Academics at USNA different from those in High School? More competition for your time. Faster pace. Higher expectations. –Analytical or critical thinking skills –Writing skills –Mathematical skills Greater freedom to mess up. –More time between quizzes or major assignments –Professors expect you to be responsible

33 What do professors expect? EFFORT! –Be prepared for class (read ahead) –Turn in quality work (neat and on time) –Show interest (even if you fake it) –Show respect to professor and classmates –On-time and awake! Communication –About how to make up missed work –About what to do when you need help

34 What does my Professor Expect? Most will tell you on day 1 Pay attention to their stated preferences, pet peeves, etc. Read the Course Policy Statement for information on –Course objectives, requirements, etc. –Homework Policy –Test Policy –Grading Policy

35 Course Policy Statements ACDEANINST 1531.58: instructor/department grading policy homework policy including collaboration preference on formats quizzes departmental/instructor examinations extra instruction procedures classroom work laboratory work (if applicable) course objectives

36 Questions about Expectations? What does a section leader do? Can you drink or eat in class? Is it important to read your textbooks? Is your homework graded? What happens if you turn in an assignment late? How are your grades calculated?

37 Time Management So many things to do. So little time. So what?

38 Typical 4/C Weekly Schedule NS101 SC111 FP130 SM131 NL110 SM131 FP130 HE111 SC111 NS101 NL110 How many hours should I be studying? Guideline: 2 hours for each hour in class. When will I find the time? Free Periods (10 hrs) Study Pds (18 hrs) Weekends (10 hrs) Physical Mission Period Home Football Game Forrestal Lecture 19 hours in class. Need ~ 38 study hours.

39 Basics of Time Management To Do List –Your memory will fail. Write assignments down. –Consolidate assignments onto one list. –Include the due dates. Daily calendar –Discipline yourself to use it. –Recurring events should be placed on the calendar once. –Paper calendars have mobility advantages. Plan –Look at your To Do List and Calendar and plan when you will accomplish the events on them. –Otherwise they are actually a waste of your time.

40 Strategies for Academic Success http://intranet.usna.edu/AcCenter/documents.htm

41 Tips to Success at the U. S. Naval Academy A Bakers Dozen 1. Sit in the front row and pay attention in class. 2. Start working hard the very first day. Don't fall behind. 3. Stay awake. Stand if necessary. 4. Do all the assignment before going to class skim for major points then read for details. 5. Make sure you grasp basic concepts as you go along. Ask questions about what you don't understand. 6. Participate in class. Don't let anything go by that you don't understand. 7. Learn from questions asked by others. Pay attention to what is going on. 8. Take good notes in class. Class notes help you understand what the professor wants. 9. Be sure to copy down problem types and examples given in class. 10. Organize your notes as soon as possible after class. Fill in the blanks. 11. Arrange for extra instruction (EI) if you start falling behind or, as you become confused. Go at the first sign of difficulty. 12. Study and review with others. Begin your review for exams at least one week before the exam date. 13. Study subjects you like later than the ones you don't.

42 Problem Solving Courses Calculus, Chemistry, Physics, Statics, Dynamics, EE, Boats, Steam, Weapons, Navigation…. Rule 1: Always do your class assignments Rule 2: Be an active Participant during class When all else fails, see Rule 1

43 Non-Problem Solving Courses History, Poly Sci, English, Leadership, Ethics, Naval Science SQ3R System –Survey –Question –Read –Recite –Review Repeat

44 Questions about Study Skills How much should I study? Where should I study? What about group study? Should I take notes? How? How do I get EI? How should I prepare for EI? How should I prepare for tests?

45 What if I need help? Getting in trouble Getting back out

46 Academic Deficiency have a semester QPR below 1.50. fail two or more courses in one semester. fail any course after having failed two or more courses previously. fail to earn a 2.00 in summer school. fail to remove probation. fail to fulfill any condition as prescribed by the Academic Board as the result of a previous deficiency. fail to successfully complete all requirements for graduation by the end of that semester in which you are scheduled to graduate. fall two or more courses behind the number of courses required by the end of a given semester according to that major's matrix. fail to achieve the required standards in prescribed summer training. deficient in physical education at the end of a semester or receive failing grades in conduct and military performance. fail a remedial course such as HE101, SM005 or HE344.

47 Getting Help START EARLY as soon as you think you need it. EI The first resort! Call, email or visit your professor. Ask other mids But dont just copy their work. MGSP Group Study led by a mid. A process, not a quick fix. Department Resources: –Chemistry Resource Center: MI100 –Math Lab: CH130 –Writing Center: SAG20 Academic Center –Plebe Intervention Program (by invitation) –Plebe Advising Program –Learning Skills Program –Extra Help Classes (Math, Chemistry, Physics) –Evening Tutoring Chaplains, MDC, Medical

48 Whats Next? Parents Weekend: 7 – 9 Aug Computer Issue: 13 Aug Majors Briefings: 17 – 19 Aug (and up to March) Classes Begin: 24 Aug Pre-registration: 11 – 18 Sep –You must meet with your advisor first to get approval for your spring courses –Well be sending you email and arranging meetings, probably in the Company wardroom

49 Closing Thoughts! This is your college education. You will need to work hard but you can succeed. Your instructors are pulling for you. Get organized, challenge yourself and have some fun!


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