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CREATING A SAFETY PROGRAM for YOUR SMALL BUSINESS

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1 CREATING A SAFETY PROGRAM for YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Notes to Instructor: Welcome everyone to class and tell a little bit about yourself and your credentials in Health and Safety. Give a brief overview of the 3 classes. We will start out today by giving a pre-course exam on safety issues to get a feel for what areas everyone is either weak or strong in. Each week we will do a recap/review and then at the end of the 3 classes we will take another test to see what we have learned and evaluate the class to tweak it and make it better for other classes. There are 3 DVD Videos that go along with the classes. One will be played each week to go along with the curriculum Video #1 is on Accident Investigation The video is 13 minutes and addresses the major areas needed to comply with the standard, including: The goals of an accident investigation Securing an accident scene "Root-cause" analysis The importance of investigative interviews Assisting in an accident investigation Reporting the "near misses" The role of policies, equipment and training on accident prevention Video #2 is on Hazardous Communication Standard and is The video is 17 minutes and addresses the major areas needed to comply with the standard, including: Contents of the OSHA Standard To whom the standard applies Understanding chemicals: Physical and health hazards, Routes of exposure ,Acute or chronic effects ,MSDS and chemical labels ,Personal Protective Equipment , Exposure to hazardous chemicals ,Leaks and spills Video #3 is New Employee Orientation for Construction detailing site hazards. The video is 19 minutes and addresses the major areas needed to comply with the standard. Working in the construction industry brings with it many challenges and dangers. Your employer is working to ensure you make it home safe and sound at the end of the work day. Whether you are a painter, carpenter, electrician, plumber or roofer, your health and safety is the number one priority at the work site. As an employee, you are faced every day with situations that require prior training, quick decisions and proper actions. This booklet discusses a variety of topics and introduces some basic safety rules to help you recognize and prevent hazards at the work site. Your employer will provide more in-depth training on each topic as needed. This training program on "Safety Orientation for Construction" encourages employees to have a positive attitude about safety as well as provides introductory safety training on some of the most common workplace safety issues. Videos are from National Safety Compliance – Previews available on line at HCA

2 Pre Course Quiz What is an incident?___________________________________________________________ Power tools must be fitted with guards and safety switches. True or False Employees attitude may affect safety . True or False Fall protection is required any time you use a ladder over 6 feet. True or False Employees are must take personal responsibility for their safety, their co-workers and others on a jobsite. True or False MSDS’s are required for most chemicals used at a worksite and should be kept locked up in the supervisor’s office for Safety. True or False Guard rails should be installed along all open sides and ends of platforms. True or False When setting up goals for safety on a worksite the acceptable number of incidents should be set at___________. (give a number) If a fatality happens on a jobsite due to negligence, unsafe conditions, etc. Who is usually responsible and held accountable? Owner of company, Supervisor, Co-worker. Circle one Safety rules and guidelines and must always be written. True or False It is OSHA’s responsibility to establish and implement a written hazard communication program. True or False Approximately 32 million workers work with or are potentially exposed to chemical hazards. True or False MSDS’s are printed on a mandatory standard OSHA form. PPE is usually an optional step for employees in dealing with hazardous chemicals. True or False HazCom is commonly referred to as Right to know True or False What is a Near Miss?_____________________________Do these need to be reported and investigated? True or False Employers are responsible to pay for all PPE for their employees. True or False Safety Inspections should be conducted on all sites at least yearly. True or False OSHA mandates First aid and CPR training for workers on sites. True or False AHA stands for “All Hands Attention”. True or False Pass out quiz – then discuss after they fill in. This will help instructor judge where the students are.

3 Four Elements Of a Workplace Safety Program
Element #1 - Management, Leadership and Employee Involvement. Element #2, 3 – Worksite Analysis and Hazard Prevention and Control. Element #4 – Safety and Health Training and Education. Over the next 3 weeks we will look at these three in detail - Our GOAL IS THAT SUPERVISORS WILL BE BETTER ABLE TO IMPLEMENT SAFETY PROGRAMS INTO THEIR ROUTINE OPERATIONS….. We have a number of different types of businesses represented here and we want everyone to learn techniques to help improve safety for your specific organization…….We want everyone to decrease job related injuries, illnesses and fatalities. This is a new proto type program…..so it will change based on your input and comments and recommendations. We value your input and request that you ask questions. If we don’t have time during class, we will be glad to stay after and my will be available for any needing further information. Today we begin with ….Management, leadership and Employee Involvement

4 ELEMENT #1 Management/Leadership/Employee Involvement
Employer and employee involvement and communication on workplace-safety and health issues are essential. Post the company’s written safety and health policy for all to see. Involve all employees in policy making on safety and health issues. Everyone must take an active part in Safety Activities. 1. If safety goals are not set at zero, an employer sends a message to employees that severe and disabling incidents are acceptable. One must understand that the safety culture must be viewed similar to a quality program. The zero incidents concept must be agreed upon and understood by management first. Management leaders that demonstrate a personal commitment and genuine interest to safety can have a substantial impact on any organization. This coupled with employee participation and management support is one of the key success factors in any safety program. If you take a look at safety management principles, they show us that about 96% of all incidents are caused by unsafe acts of people or unsafe conditions. So in times past the worker was always blamed for accidents If you relate these two theories together and think about what has been stated, management has control of employee actions and thus control of the entire safety system. Clearly, management controls the …..purse strings. If you have ever studied the successes of Dr. Deming, you will find that some of his philosophies can be adapted to safety quite well. According to Dr. Edward Deming, 94% of the problems in business are due to lack of management commitment. * We must adopt a safety culture that fits the needs of the organization. YOUR ORGANIZATION

5 Management/Leadership/Employee Involvement
What is Workplace Safety? Definition: The process of protecting employees from work related illness and injury. It starts by the development of a company Environmental, Safety and Health Policy statement and implementation of a work place safety plan and program. Benefits of Good Safety Management: Protects the employees’ well-being Reduces the amount of money paid out in: Health insurance benefits Workers’ compensation benefits and Wages for temporary help Saves cost of: Lost-work hours (days away from work or restricted hours or job transfer), Time spent in orienting temporary help Programs and services that may suffer due to fewer employees Safety can never be managed on a campaign basis. Effective safety management must be ongoing. The effort devoted to safety gives a good return, not only in terms of a reduction in the cost of medical and workers’ compensation, but also in greater productivity, improved product or research quality, better employee relations, and a overall operation improvement. Managing safety involves changing the way employees think. - This is a key principle When you have successfully influenced a worker’s thinking about safety, you can also modify his attitude to other work priorities. This modification leads to better management and is the key to improved employee relations and greater productivity. next slide – accident defination!!!!

6 Ac-ci-dent (ak-si-duhnt) noun
an unexpected unplanned, uncontrollable, and undesirable event. If this definition is correct – There is nothing you can do Uncontrollable means it can’t be controlled The first thing we need to do is remove UNCONTROLABLE from the definition

7 Ac-ci-dent (ak-si-duhnt)
2. an unexpected unplanned, and undesirable event. accidents can be controlled Lets talk about the Psychology of the word accident….. We have learned from childhood to use the word accident as a way of getting out of being responsible for our actions…. Our mothers taught us this…..we knocked over a lamp and broke it as a child and we would say…….I’m sorry mom……it was and accident….and she would say…..THATS OK……..IT WAS JUST AN ACCIDENT….and so people have grown up excepting accidents as an EXCUSE for our inability to manage or to take responsibility for an action.

8 Basic Principles of Good Safety Management
Management Commitment Documented Safety Philosophy Safety Goals and Objectives Committee Organization for Safety Line Responsibility for Safety Supportive Safety Staff Rules and Procedures Audits Safety Communications Safety Training Accident Investigations Motivation

9 Management/Leadership/Employee Involvement
We must promote the goal of ZERO INCIDENT PERFORMANCE through planning. Safety Goals must be Communicated- They must be Realistic and they need to reflect the Safety Culture of your organization. Your Safety Culture requires strong commitment from the top and Safety must truly be the #1 priority. It must become an integral part of your business and Safety must become EVERYONE’s responsibility. 1. If safety goals are not set at zero, an employer sends a message to employees that severe and disabling incidents are acceptable. One must understand that the safety culture must be viewed similar to a quality program. The zero incidents concept must be agreed upon and understood by management first. Management leaders that demonstrate a personal commitment and genuine interest to safety can have a substantial impact on any organization. This coupled with employee participation and management support is one of the key success factors in any safety program. If you take a look at safety management principles, they show us that about 96% of all incidents are caused by unsafe acts of people or unsafe conditions. So in times past the worker was always blamed for accidents If you relate these two theories together and think about what has been stated, management has control of employee actions and thus control of the entire safety system. Clearly, management controls the …..purse strings. If you have ever studied the successes of Dr. Deming, you will find that some of his philosophies can be adapted to safety quite well. According to Dr Edward Deming, 94% of the problems in business are due to lack of management commitment. * We must adopt a safety culture that fits the needs of the organization. YOUR ORGANIZATION

10 Basic Safety Philosophy
Every Incident can be avoided. No Job is worth getting hurt for. Every job will be done safely. Incidents can be managed. Safety is Everyone’s Responsibility. Safety/Best manufacturing practices Safety standards, procedures and practices must be developed. Training- Everyone must understand AND meet the requirements. Working Safely is a Condition of Employment Safe work cultures starts from simple common beliefs that are supported by all employees in an organization Safety/Best manufacturing practices – This is a line management function – Front line supervisors must make this happen. Involvement – Helps to build OWNERSHIP in the program….so we must involve everyone. Audits and Investigations – will help you evaluate the implementation of your programs.

11 Benefits of a Zero Incident Safety Policy
Safety standards are communicated to all employees. Responsibilities for implementing standards are understood and accepted Records will document how standards and Best Management Practices are met. Internal management control Cost Avoidance Improved Quality Better Productivity Team Building Unsafe behavior stands out Unsafe behavior is Unacceptable Safe Work is influenced through peer pressure Consistent planning and task execution As we have stated before, it is the goal of the workplace safety policy to establish the expectation that it is the responsibility of all personnel to create and maintain a safe work environment OSHA act regulates all workplaces to ensure that certain standards are met….. Must train our staff annually concerning workplace hazards such as chemical substances, blood borne pathogens….and reporting requirements mandate that we have our people report all illness or injuries immediately.

12 Key Safety Principles Working Safely is a condition of employment.
Each employee is expected to give consideration to the prevention of injury to self and co-workers. Involvement and thinking of all people in the safety process is valued and expected. Continual Improvement is the goal. Individuals and teams must be recognized for their adherence to and advancement of safety. Once these key steps are understood, the safety culture change will start to transform. One must keep in mind that this change will not happen overnight but will come gradually Reinforcing safe work habits is just as important as eliminating unsafe behavior. Most people tend to repeat behaviors that result in positive consequences and discontinue those that result in negative consequences. Positive reinforcement is the only means available to maintain existing good behavior

13 Maintaining an Incident Free Environment
Shared Vision Cultural Alignment Focus on Incident Control Upstream Systems Feedback Maintain the 4 – A’s Cultural Change Commitment Shared Vision - Reaching an incident free culture starts with a vision. A vision is something that everyone can see. Cultural Alignment - Everyone must pull in the same direction. There is consistency between what we do about safety and what we all say about safety. Practices and behaviors are in line with the vision of continuous safety performance. Focus on Incident Control - We must operate at a level of continuous improvement in relationship, safety, quality, etc.(examples: tools, PPE, inspections) Upstream Systems - Make sure employees at all levels know how they are doing. Feedback - This is common. It must be valued, whether it is negative or positive. Feedback must flow back and forward. 4- A’s - ATTITUDE – AWARENESS – ACTION – ACCOUNTABILITY Cultural Change- Comes from top management. Management must communicate with employees and explain why the change must occur. Most important, management must promote how the employee will benefit from the change in safety culture. Commitment – Safety must be more than a program, a book or procedures….It must start with your companies philosophy….”AN ATTITUDE”

14 What a Safety Statement might look like (This is an EXERCISE)
It is the intent of XYZ Industries to provide a safe work environment for all our workers and the wellness of our people, families and communities. We embrace healthy habits and behaviors. It is also our intent to properly manage any incidents that occur so as to minimize injury and other forms of loss. A well managed workplace safety program can benefit our company in countless ways. In order for XYZ Industries to achieve our goals, we have developed a safety program outlining our policies and procedures regarding employee health and safety. Each and every individual must become familiar with the program, follow and enforce the procedures, and become an active participant in this workplace safety program. While management (workplace safety officer and safety committee) will be responsible for developing and organizing this program, its success will depend on the involvement of each employee. We look forward to your cooperation and participation. POST IT FOR ALL TO SEE A copy of this form is on your stick as a word file so you can use and change to fit your companies statement Does your company have one???? Discuss……..Lets take a few minutes and write a basic one for your company right now – I will leave this on the board …..How about a one line safety statement – My company’s is NEVER COMPROMISING SAFETY – We had our people vote on it Our Company has selected 5 core Values and Beliefs – FRIENDSHIP/PEOPLE/SAFETY/SERVICE/PROSPERITY “We value the safety, security and wellness of our people, families and communities. We embrace healthy habits and behaviors. We plan and conduct our work in a manner that protects people, as well as property and the environment” …..but think about the type of work you do …..who your clients are……Your people……..

15 Implementing Your Workplace Safety Program
We now have a Safety Statement – Where do we go from there???? These are some of the keys to developing your program. Use of Inspections, surveillances, incident reporting, AHA’s Investigations, corrective actions, provide Safety leadership

16 Workplace Safety Program
Purpose- To reduce work-related injury & illness Content- The program should include any policy, procedure, training that protects workers from work-related injury and illness while on the job. Concerns- Promote & reward safe practices at work, reducing injuries & illnesses at work and eliminating fatalities at work. Purpose- As we said previously it also increases productivity, stronger profit margin due less accident costs. Content – In addition to the physical and site controls we might address…….Healthy Life styles – No smoking campaigns, health eating recopies, exercise programs, No cell-phone while driving company vehicles policy Do you supply any of your workers phones or vehicles?-----If so develop a non-talking phone policy !

17 Co-Workers Affect Each other’s Safety
Employees’ health and safety are affected not only by their own actions but by those of their co-workers. Senior management must: Help employees manage hazards associated with their work (tasks or responsibilities). They must determine that employees are fit for work. Fitness involves: drug and alcohol issues, physical and emotional well being, and fatigue and stress. We can be hurt by the inattention or unsafe practices of co-workers……Give an illustration of an incident that affected you. MINE- (Rick at Chemical company….didn’t latch safety catch and drum fell out of drum hoist -5ft in the air and injured my leg and gave me a blood clot and he started a fire another time because he did not follow instructions and did not properly ground a tank of solvent.) Part of your Safety Program should include pre-drug/alcohol screens, regular and random checks. Doing a pre-health screen will also show if there are pre-existing illnesses or injuries – We do not allow people to come on our site if they are already on light or restricted duty due to an injury!!!!

18 Create Ownership of the program
Workers need to be involved in the creation and use of the workplace safety program for it to succeed. For Example: Your company is responsible for supplying appropriate safety equipment, but employees are responsible for wearing personal protective equipment at the appropriate time and place. Your company should provide training to help employees carry out their assignments, but workers are responsible for attending this training, asking questions and telling supervisors if they do not understand what is being explained. Get them involved in weekly inspections……daily or weekly SAFETY OBSERVER PROGRAM - Risk Assessment Cards(RAC) – ECCO SLIPS – These are some tools I use to get workers involved (PASS OUT) When they do make comments or suggestions……Don’t ignore their input - Acknowledge it even if it is negative. Involve them in AHA task development tools

19 Allow for Continuous Improvement
In workplace safety and health, continuous improvement is about: Seeking better ways to work Measuring performance Reporting against set targets Evaluating compliance with procedures, standards and regulations Understanding the causes of incidents and injuries and Openly acknowledging and promptly correcting deficiencies. We should continually be updating and adding to our safety plan based on incident investigations, inspections, safety committee recommendations, etc.

20 Measuring Performance
Performance can be measured by: Reduction in frequency of lost-time injury Reduction in frequency of medical treatment (beyond first-aid care) injury. Reduction in number of sick days used Lower workers compensation costs Lower medical benefits payments ( doctor’s visits, prescription drugs) Workplace safety is an ongoing endeavor and the program is slated to be updated at least annually. It is important not to get bogged down in the planning, but to allow enough time to create a program that meets your needs and culture. Allow time for: Plan development, program introduction, program roll-out and implementation and ongoing training for all staff. Tailor the program to your specific needs – You will need information on: job functions, accident history, OSHA visits and inspections (if applicable), insurance information and resources, and any pertinent legislation (local, state and federal) - This course will give you a number of resources OSHA act and ADA are two sets of laws that affect many employers

21 OSHA (29 CFR,1970) covers nearly all employees
The general duty clause reads “Each employer shall furnish…a place of employment which is free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to his employees.” Need to communicate employees rights under the OSHA Act, including the right to file a complaint free from discrimination and explain the elements of a valid complaint. This is OSHA’s main task – to Insure safe work places and insuring workers safety If there is time – discuss Golden Gate/Hoover Dam construction and fires that killed hundreds of workers and why OSH act was put in place. Workers if they report an unsafe condition are protected and cannot be fired.

22 Employees Rights under OSHA Act
Get training from your employer on chemicals you are exposed to during your work and information on how to protect yourself from harm. Employers must establish a comprehensive, written hazard communication program (Chemical Hazard Communication) Your employer must label chemical containers, make material safety data sheets with detailed hazard information available to employees, and train you about the health effects of the chemicals you work with and what the employer is doing and what you can do to protect yourself from these hazards. The program must list the hazardous chemicals in each work area, how the employer will inform employees of the hazards of non-routine tasks (for example, the cleaning of reactor vessels), and hazards associated with chemicals in unlabeled pipes and how the employer will inform other employers at a multi-employer worksite of the hazards to which their employees may be exposed. Get training from your employer on a variety of other health and safety hazards and standards that your employer must follow. These include lockout-tagout, bloodborne pathogens, confined spaces, construction hazards and a variety of other subjects. Access relevant exposure and medical records. (29 CFR )

23 Employees Rights under OSHA Act
Request information from your employer on safety and health hazards in your workplace, chemicals used in your workplace, tests your employer has done to measure chemical, noise and radiation levels, precautions you should take and procedures to be followed if you or other employees are involved in an incident or are exposed to hazardous chemicals or other toxic substances. Request copies of appropriate standards, rules, regulations and requirements that your employer should have available at the workplace. Review the Log and Summary of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (OSHA 300) at a reasonable time and in a reasonable manner or have an authorized representative do so for you. (29 CFR ) Access relevant exposure and medical records. (29 CFR )

24 Employees Rights under OSHA Act
Employers must inform you of the existence, location and availability of your medical and exposure records when you first begin employment and at least annually thereafter. Employers also must provide these records to you or your designated representatives within 15 working days of your request. When an employer plans to stop doing business and there is no successor employer to receive and maintain these records, the employer must notify you of your right of access to records at least 3 months before the employer ceases to do business. Observe any monitoring or measuring of toxic materials or chemicals, as well as harmful physical agents, such as noise, and see the resulting records. If the exposure levels are above the OSHA limit, the employer must tell you what will be done to reduce the exposure -- the right to observe monitoring exists only where monitoring is performed pursuant to a standard that provides employees with the right to observe. REQUEST ACTION FROM YOUR EMPLOYER TO CORRECT HAZARDS OR VIOLATIONS.

25 Employees Rights under OSHA Act
You may ask your employer to correct hazards even if they are not violations of specific OSHA standards. Be sure to keep copies of any requests you make to your employer to correct hazards. FILE A COMPLAINT WITH OSHA if you believe that there are either violations of OSHA standards or serious workplace hazards. File a complaint and request OSHA to conduct an inspection if you believe serious workplace hazards or violations of standards exist in your workplace. You can file a complaint online, in writing, by telephone or fax. If you want an OSHA inspector to come inspect your workplace, put your complaint in writing and send it to the OSHA office nearest you. (OSH Act, Section 8), (29 CFR ) Request in your written complaint that OSHA keep your name confidential if you do not want your employer to know who filed the complaint. (OSH Act, Section 8) BE INVOLVED IN OSHA'S INSPECTION of your workplace.

26 Employees Rights under OSHA Act
Have an authorized employee representative (such as a union representative) accompany the OSHA compliance officer during the inspection tour. (OSH Act, Section 8), (29 CFR ) The authorized employee representative has a right to accompany an OSHA compliance officer (also referred to as a compliance safety and health officer (CSHO) or inspector) during an inspection. Under no circumstances may the employer choose the workers' representative. Where there is no union or employee representative, the OSHA inspector must talk confidentially with a reasonable number of workers during the course of the investigation. Respond to questions from the compliance officer and tell the compliance officer about workplace hazards, particularly if there is no authorized employee representative accompanying the compliance officer on the inspection "walkaround." (OSH Act, Section 8)

27 Employees Rights under OSHA Act
You and your coworkers have a right to talk privately and confidentially to the compliance officer whether or not a workers' representative has been chosen. You may point out hazards, describe injuries or illnesses or near misses that resulted from those hazards and describe past complaints about hazards. Inform the inspector if working conditions are not normal during the inspection. Make sure that the inspector is aware if equipment has been shut down, windows opened or other conditions changed from normal. FIND OUT RESULTS OF AN OSHA INSPECTION. Find out the results of OSHA inspections and request a review if OSHA decides not to issue a citation. If health hazards are present in your workplace, a special OSHA health inspection may be conducted by an industrial hygienist. This OSHA inspector may take samples to measure levels of chemicals or other hazardous materials. OSHA will let the employee representative know whether your employer is in compliance. The inspector also will gather detailed information about your employer's efforts to control health hazards, including results of tests your employer may have conducted.

28 Employees Rights under OSHA Act
GET INVOLVED in any meetings or hearings to discuss any objections your employer has to OSHA's citations or to changes in abatement deadlines. File a discrimination complaint (under Section 11(c) of the OSH Act) within 30 days if you are punished or discriminated against for exercising your safety and health rights or for refusing to work (not guaranteed by the OSH Act) when faced with an imminent danger of death or serious injury and there is insufficient time for OSHA to inspect. REQUEST A RESEARCH INVESTIGATION ON POSSIBLE WORKPLACE HEALTH HAZARDS. Contact the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to request a health hazard evaluation if you are concerned about toxic effects of a substance in the workplace. PROVIDE COMMENTS AND TESTIMONY TO OSHA during rulemaking on new standards.

29 Employees Rights under OSHA Act
File an appeal of the deadlines that OSHA sets for your employer to correct any violation in the citation issued to the employer. Write to the OSHA Area Director within 15 working days from the date the employer posts the notice requesting on extension of the abatement deadline if you feel the time is too long. (29 CFR ) FILE A DISCRIMINATION COMPLAINT. File a discrimination complaint (under Section 11(c) of the OSH Act) within 30 days if you are punished or discriminated against for exercising your safety and health rights or for refusing to work (not guaranteed by the OSH Act) when faced with an imminent danger of death or serious injury and there is insufficient time for OSHA to inspect. REQUEST A RESEARCH INVESTIGATION ON POSSIBLE WORKPLACE HEALTH HAZARDS. Contact the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to request a health hazard evaluation if you are concerned about toxic effects of a substance in the workplace. PROVIDE COMMENTS AND TESTIMONY TO OSHA during rulemaking on new standards.

30 Occupational Safety and Health Program Includes
COMPLIANCE WITH STANDARDS ANNUAL OSH INSPECTIONS ABATEMENT OF HAZARDS PROCEDURES TO REPORT HAZARDS WITHOUT FEAR OF REPRISAL OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY & HEALTH TRAINING ACCIDENT REPORTING & INVESTIGATIONS HEALTH SURVEILLANCE PROGRAMS PERFORMANCE EVALUATIONS Here are some key ingredients

31 Management Leadership and Employee Involvement in S&H Issues
Your plan should include statements on the value of workplace safety and why management is committed to it. A list of locations where written safety and health policies are posted for all employees to see. A schedule of when and where regular meetings are held that address employee safety and health issues. A stipulation that abiding by all safety and health rules is a condition of employment. Note: This is the 3rd time we’ve mentioned Safety as a condition of employment - Don’t forget it. ENFORCE IT.

32 Workplace Safety Training
Staff member training and education about safety rules and their responsibilities in the workplace will pay off in a safer and healthier workforce. Remember: the health and safety of employees are affected not only by their own actions but by those of co-workers. Ensure that everyone in the workplace is properly trained: managers, supervisors all full and part time and temporary workers. Make sure no one does any job that appears unsafe. Workplace safety training needs to address: general safety topics and safety topics specific to a particular work area, task or department. General topics include: Why workplace safety is essential-statistics on accidents/deaths on the job. Description of the most common types of workplace injuries at your entity and how these injuries might have been prevented. A top 5 list of the most important things to remember about workplace safety in relation to your workplace injuries. Topics could affect: Kitchen, construction, office, roof, elevators, stairways, hazardous materials, confined spaces, housekeeping, off-site, grounds-keeping. Training needs to work around employee staffing schedules and target new staff members and those needing refreshers. Be Flexible and train on any new equipment that you may start using.

33 Workplace Safety Training
Hold emergency preparedness drills for workers. Include nature of drill and expectations for employees during the drill. Pay close attention to employees learning new operations to make sure they have the proper job skills and awareness of the hazards. Expectations must be provided in the trainings. Supervisors and managers must be trained to recognize hazards and understand their responsibilities. Provide them with guidelines for reporting and correcting hazards. The workplace safety plan and trainings need to be evaluated at regular intervals to ensure that both address the most current workplace-safety issues. Let your safety committee help you out with this. SUPERVISORS - I often hear them say….I don’t have time to watch them or baby sit them on safety. You’d better. If someone gets hurt or killed, because of lack of training or understanding or bypassing safety standards….guess who can be fined or given jail time…THE RESPONSIBLE SUPERVISOR!

34 Workplace Safety Training
Supervisors and managers are: Responsible for daily monitoring of workplace safety practices. Accountable for mentoring, advising and counseling staff members who are not performing up to written policies and expectations. Authorized to recommend a staff member for remedial training in a skill or on a machine or in attitude, as required.

35 Supervisors Responsibilities
SET EXAMPLE KNOW, COMMUNICATE, AND ENFORCE STANDARDS OBSERVE EMPLOYEES WORKING ANALYZE & DISCUSS SAFETY HAZARDS COMMUNICATE WITH YOUR EMPLOYEES FOLLOW UP WITH YOUR EMPLOYEES TRAIN ALL EMPLOYEES ON RULES & PROCEDURES CONDUCT INSPECTIONS ACKNOWLEDGE SAFETY BEHAVIOR INVESTIGATE & REPORT ACCIDENTS CORRECT UNSAFE UNHEALTHFUL CONDITIONS As a supervisor you should: Set the example Know, communicate, and enforce existing standards Observe employees working. Check employees’ actions against any existing procedures. Analyze and discuss safety hazards. Discuss with employees the “tricky” parts of their jobs. Write down the rule or procedure. Unwritten rules and procedures become hazy and are far too open to different interpretations. Communicate with your employees. Open lines of communication can clear up confusion. Follow up with your employees. Look in on employees during the activity and follow up to see how the job may have been done differently. Train all employees on rules and procedures. Change rules and procedures as necessary. Keep them up-to-date.

36 Supervisors Responsibilities
INFORM ALL EMPLOYEES BEFORE THEIR INITIAL ASSIGNMENT OR WHEN A NEW HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL IS INTRODUCED INTO THEIR WORK AREA- (Hazardous Communication Standard) TRAIN EMPLOYEES HOW TO: IDENTIFY AND PROTECT THEMSELVES FROM CHEMICAL HAZARDS RECOGNIZE THE PHYSICAL AND HEALTH HAZARDS OF CHEMICALS IN THEIR AREA OBTAIN AND USE THE MSDS DOCUMENT ALL TRAINING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Hazardous Communication Standards Training is mandated by OSHA for all workers yearly – We will look at and discuss more in the next lesson

37 8 BASIC HAZARD COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENTS
LABEL CONTAINERS DO NOT REMOVE OR DEFACE LABELS INFORM AND TRAIN EMPLOYEES WRITTEN HAZCOM PROGRAM DETERMINE HAZARDS COMPOSE MSDS PROVIDE CUSTOMERS WITH MSDS AND WARNING LABELS KEEP MSDS ON FILE AND ACCESSIBLE

38 Take an Active part in Safety Activities
COMPLY WITH Occupational Safety & Health STANDARDS REPORT WORKPLACE HAZARDS REPORT TO SUPERVISOR ILLNESSES/ INJURIES OR PROPERTY DAMAGE RESULTING FROM INCIDENT – IMMEDIATELY!! * Employees that don’t report minor incidents, often get worse if not treated and can become more serious……could cost your company a lot. Report and treat Immediately

39 Take an Active part in Safety Activities
Actively participate in the daily safety meetings. Supervision should encourage employees to lead in regular safety meetings. Provide input in the development, review and suggestions of improvements to safe work procedures, AHA’s, SOP’s, and in incident report investigations, corrective actions and lessons learned, safety committee. Make opportunities for the workers or they will not get involved.

40 Take an Active part in Safety Activities
Safety must be everyone’s concern. In most small companies the role of a workplace safety coordinator can be incorporated into someone’s job description. In larger groups a safety director, officer or manager is usually in charge of the workplace safety program and appoints or sets up a safety committee to assist in implementing the safety program. Committee’s can be made up of many different people with different resources and abilities. ESTABLISH A SAFETY COMMITTEE Need a chair person to lead the group, schedules monthly meetings, serve as a contact with outside agencies, retains all safety related documents Functions of a safety committee- Create carry out and watch over safety specific programs Hold monthly meetings Hold monthly workplace safety inspections Run quarterly loss analysis-review injury and illness records Make advisory recommendations to your companies managers May include specific safety programs such as: back injury prevention Bloodborne pathogens Fire evacuation Hazard communications Fleet safety Emergency response Review of Accident / Incident investigation reports Programs should be reviewed at least yearly by committee to ensure quality and effectiveness and compliance with all codes.

41 Take an Active part in Safety Activities
Encourage employees to lead and participate in the Daily Safety Meetings. Taking personal actions and working directly with supervisors to identify, control, or eliminate potential safety hazards. Reporting of all injuries, near misses or accidents immediately. Involvement in incident/accident investigations corrective actions and sharing Lessons Learned.

42 Accident/Incident Investigations Today we want to look at:
Goals of Accident Investigation Securing the Accident Scene Root-Cause Analysis The importance of Investigative Interviews Assisting in Accident Investigations Reporting Near Misses The Role of Policies, equipment and training on Accident Prevention. Sometimes in spite of our best efforts…….things go wrong and While Accidents happen for OBVIOUS reasons - There are many other things that may contribute to an accident, which are not always apparent and that is why we need to conduct thorough accident investigations. While Investigations are focusing on determining the causes of an accident…….. The overall GOAL is to prevent similar Accidents from happening again View the ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION MOVIE PROVIDED IN COURSE MATERIALS AT THIS TIME

43 REVIEW All injuries can be prevented
Management is responsible for preventing injuries Working safely is a condition of employment Training employees to work safely is essential and everyone must be involved. Prevention of personal injuries is good business (and good science!)

44 Four Elements Of a Workplace Safety Program
Element 1 - Management, Leadership and Employee Involvement. Element 2, 3 – Worksite Analysis and Hazard Prevention and Control. Element 4 – Safety and Health Training and Education Class 2 Today we will start out with some Hands on training for entire class. Included are a number 8x10’s that are provided of a number of hazards in the instructors manual………(small copies provided here). Place on the wall or hand out a couple to each student. The idea is to give them a piece of paper and have them identify any hazards. Some are OK and no hazards, others may have multiple issues. We are trying to get them to understand how important DAILY / WEEKLY / MONTHLY inspections are. Also the drill will show how certain people see certain things and others do not – This is why it is important to get more people involved in site inspections to insure we don’t miss things.

45 Element #2 - Worksite Analysis
Analyze all workplace conditions to identify and eliminate existing or potential hazards. An outline of the procedure for reporting hazards Perform analysis on a regular and timely basis. Make certain all employees know and understand current hazard analysis for all jobs and processes. Focus workplace design on all physical aspects of the work environment, including the following: Size and arrangement of work space Physical demands of the tasks to be performed Design of tools and other devices people use The fundamental goal of a workplace design is to improve people’s ability to be productive, without error or accident, for extended time periods. Proper workplace design improves both safety and productivity. We want to eliminate hazards during the design or planning stages of a project Review incident causes, inspection results to help identify trends Knowledge of Emergency Response Plans and procedures and participation in drills WEEK #2 - Worksite Analysis INTRO - The process of identifying and evaluating potential hazards is a critical element in achieving ZERO Incident Performance and creating low risk/ hazard free work areas.

46 Identifying and Evaluating Potential Hazards SAFETY AUDITS / INSPECTIONS
Purpose - Inspection of work areas and audits of safety programs are tools that can be used to identify problems and hazards before these conditions result in accidents or injuries. Audits also help to identify the effectiveness of safety program management and can be used as a guide to assure regulatory compliance and a safe workplace. Responsibilities Management Design and schedule audit and inspection procedures for all work areas, processes and procedures. Conduct routine audits and inspections Ensure audits are conducted by employees who understand the various safety programs and policies Supervisors conduct informal daily safety inspections and ensure all unsafe conditions are corrected conduct documented weekly inspections and ensure all unsafe conditions are corrected Corrections All safety deficiencies found during audits and inspections should be corrected as soon as possible. Documentation of corrections should be made on the audit or inspection sheet. And conditions that present a hazards are to be corrected or controlled immediately. Any of the workforce found to be in breach of safety requirements during an inspection should be counseled and discipline will be needed if persistent transgressors are observed. USE of a deficiency tracking log

47 Identifying and Evaluating Potential Hazards SAFETY AUDITS / INSPECTIONS
Types of Inspections Supervisor & Management Daily Walk-through: this is an undocumented inspection that is made daily prior to startup and shift change to ensure the facility and equipment are in safe conditions for Employees. All noted unsafe areas are placed in a safe condition prior to Employees working in the area. Weekly Supervisor Inspections are conducted and recorded with a Employee. This documented inspection provides a focus to ensure current hazard controls are still effective, equipment is in safe condition and safe work practices are in use. Discrepancies are listed on the inspection sheet, recorded on work orders for correction. The inspection sheet is forwarded to the Safety Manager for review and logging to track discrepancy correction. Monthly Safety Committee Inspection. Each month members of the Safety Committee will tour the entire facility with the Safety Manager. This tour is to ensure Safety Committee Members are familiar with all areas of the operation. Record of problem areas, committee recommendations and deficiencies will be recorded and provided to management. Noise Surveys are conducted at least annually, or whenever facility modifications are made that impact the ambient or specific work area noise levels,  Noise surveys are conducted by qualified persons with calibrated instruments Bring in noise monitor to class and demonstrate.

48 Equipment Inspections
Identifying and Evaluating Potential Hazards SAFETY AUDITS / INSPECTIONS Equipment Inspections Are conducted to ensure specific safety equipment is in good working order and will function when needed. Examples and frequencies are: All construction equipment - Daily prior to use – (use form and file) Sprinkler Inspection - Monthly Boiler Checks- Daily, Weekly , Monthly, Yearly Emergency Lighting Test - Monthly Fire Extinguisher Inspections - Monthly Safety Equipment Inventories - Monthly Emergency Lighting 90 Min. Test - Semiannually Respirator Inspections- Before / After Use (Monthly at a minimum) Hand tools – Daily Scaffolding – Daily

49 Regularly and thoroughly maintain equipment and vehicles.
See attachments - Equipment inspection forms are included in your packet

50 Fire Extinguisher INSPECTIONS
Word copies attached for use

51 Daily Hand Tool - INSPECTIONS
Word copies attached for use

52 Identifying and Evaluating Potential Hazards SAFETY AUDITS / INSPECTIONS
Program Audits are conducted to check the administration of specific safety and health programs. Program Audits of the following shall be conducted annually. Accident Prevention Fire Prevention Material Handling Flammable Material Storage Lockout-Tagout Hazard Communication Personal Protective Equipment Confined Space Entry Asbestos Controls Boiler Safety Bloodborne Pathogens Contractor Safety Electrical Safety Tool Safety Hot Work Respiratory Protection

53 Site Safety Inspections
CONSTRUCTION SUPERVISOR SAFETY INSPECTION CHECKLIST Date:       Job No.(s): Location: Crew Member: Supervisor: ITEM COMMENTS/CORRECTIVE ACTION Housekeeping (Garbage, cleanliness, electrical cords, ladders) Drinking water/ sanitation requirements/first aid kit Electrical (such as proper grounding, lock & tag and GFCI [good condition, inspected]) Proper personal protective equipment (PPE) Walking/working surfaces (tripping hazards, slippery surfaces, floor holes) Electrical tools (guards in place; good condition, stored properly) Cranes/ rigging equipment (for example: slings, properly stored and inspected) Excavation (properly sloped or shored; permits; inspections; barricaded daily) Construction safety inspections are the most effective means of identifying hazardous conditions at the worksite. Construction sites require constant monitoring and observations to keep ahead of safety issues Construction safety inspections ensure the safety planning and tools used have the desired effect in the real world. Construction safety inspections identify hazards and give an opportunity to fix problems before injuries and accidents can occur

54 Site Safety Inspections
Flammables/combustibles (fire extinguishers, welding and cutting equipment)       Hot work (Personal Protective Equipment, permit, combustibles, flammables protected) Material Safety Data Sheets onsite with containers labeled Scaffold system fully assembled; tags; inspections; fully planked guardrails Proper barricading/ warning signs (trenches, fuel areas, storage construction sites) Fire extinguishers (monthly inspection, accessible, on mechanized equipment) COMMENTS: ???? What other types of thing should you inspect ????

55 Identifying and Evaluating Potential Hazards SAFETY AUDITS / INSPECTIONS
It is every employees responsibility to be on the lookout for possible hazards. Report Immediately: Slippery floors and walkways – open holes in floors Tripping hazards, such as hose links, piping, extension cords, etc. Missing (or inoperative) entrance and exit signs and lighting Poorly lighted stairs Loose handrails or guard rails Open, loose or broken windows Dangerously piled supplies or equipment (HOUSEKEEPING), OILY RAGS Unlocked doors and gates Electrical equipment left operating, frayed cords, no LOTO, Panel doors left open, blocked access to electrical panels Leaks of steam, water, oil other liquids, Roof leaks Blocked aisles – Blocked fire doors Blocked fire extinguishers, sprinkler heads, Evidence of smoking in non-smoking areas Evidence of any equipment running hot or overheating Safety devices not operating properly – Warning Signs Not In Place Machine, power transmission, or drive guards missing, damaged, loose or improperly placed

56 Work Place Analysis thru Hazardous Commmunication Identification and Training
The OSHA Standard 32 million workers work with or are exposed to one or more chemical hazards. Are an estimated 650,000 existing chemical products and this poses a serious problem for exposed workers. OSHA issued the Hazard Communication standard 29 CFR , to address this issue. Hazardous Communication standard is based on a simple concept; that employees have both a need and a RIGHT TO KNOW the hazards and identities of the chemicals they are exposed to when working. HAZCOM establishes uniform requirements to make sure the hazards of all chemicals that are imported into, produced or used in U.S. workplaces are evaluated, and that this hazard information is transmitted to affected employers and exposed employees.

57 Hazard Communication Safety Training
OSHA’s Hazard Communication standard gives employees the right to know about chemical hazards in the workplace. Employers have an obligation to provide employees with training, information, Personal Protective Equipment and other safety measures dealing with chemical hazards. Employees need to remember to: Take training seriously and pay attention Read labels and Material Safety Data Sheets Know where to find the Material Safety Data Sheets Use appropriate Personal Protective Equipment Know correct emergency procedures Use safe work Habits Go to the HAZCOM TRAINING VIDEO provided for the course - Play at this time Review the film – Pass out the quiz. Review

58 Element #3 - Hazard Prevention and Control
Regularly and thoroughly maintain equipment and vehicles. (we just looked at equipment Inspections) Ensure that employees know how to use and maintain personal protective equipment (PPE) Train employees in proper procedures for handling specific situations Monitoring for air quality, heat stress, noise, ergonomics and other job hazards Emergency Action Plans and procedures - Fire, life safety and first aid issues Proper procedure training includes the use of SOP’s and AHA’s - Explain

59 Standard Operating Procedures
SOP for all types of activities:

60 Standard Operating Procedures
Drug Free workplace Recognition and Awards Audits and Surveillances Incident Reporting & Investigation Lessons Learned General Safety SOP’s- Lets discuss If have a black board – list and have group talk about SOP’s for their business…….have each group come up with a needed SOP for their type of work. Construction sop’s – Site controls, hazard evaluation, mobile construction equipment and operations, fall prevention and protection, Stairways and ladders, electrical safety, hand and power tools, fire protection, hazard communication, steel erection, concrete, back injury protection, scaffolding, PPE, Respiratory protection, Controlling hazardous energy(LOTO), Line Breaking, Hoisting and crane operation, Underground Utilities, Excavation, Blood borne pathogens, heat stress prevention, hearing conservation, asbestos abatement, lead remediation, storm water management practices and permits, spill and discharge controls, Hazardous materials transportation………

61 Ensure that employees know how to use and maintain personal protective equipment (PPE)

62 Protecting Employees from Workplace Hazards
Employers must protect employees from hazards such as falling objects, harmful substances, and noise exposures that can cause injury. Employers must: Use all feasible engineering and work practice controls to eliminate and reduce hazards. Use personal protective equipment (PPE) if the controls don’t eliminate the hazards. PPE is the last level of control! How do I identify potential hazards in my workplace? Begin with a survey. Observe the work environment. Ask employees how they perform their tasks. Look for sources of potential injury such as: • Objects that might fall from above. • Exposed pipes or beams at work level. • Exposed liquid chemicals. • Sources of heat, intense light, noise, or dust. • Equipment or materials that could produce flying particles.

63 Engineering Controls If . . . Then . . .
The work environment can be physically changed to prevent employee exposure to the potential hazard, Then . . . The hazard can be eliminated with an engineering control. Engineering Controls. Engineering controls consist of substitution, isolation, ventilation and equipment modification. Examples of engineering controls: Initial design specifications Substitute less harmful material Change process Enclose process Isolate process

64 Work Practice/ Administrative Controls
If . . . Employees can change the way they do their jobs and the exposure to the potential hazard is removed, Then . . . The hazard can be eliminated with a work practice or administrative control. Remember… PPE is the last level of control! Administrative Controls. Any procedure which significantly limits daily exposure by control or manipulation of the work schedule or manner in which work is performed. Using PPE is not administrative control. Work Practice Controls. A type of administrative control where the employer modifies the manner in which the employee performs assigned work. The modification may result in a reduction of exposure through such methods as changing work habits, improving sanitation and hygiene practices, or making other changes in the way the employee performs the job.

65 If running close on time ……
If running close on time …….scim past the PPE and go on to ORIENTATION VIDEO.

66 Examples of PPE Body Part Protection

67 1926 Subpart E, Personal protective and life saving equipment
, Criteria for personal protective equipment , Occupational foot protection , Head protection , Hearing protection , Eye and face protection , Respiratory protection , Safety belts, lifelines, and lanyards , Safety nets , Working over or near water

68 P.P.E. COMPLIANCE IT IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE EMPLOYEE,
SUPERVISOR AND HEALTH AND SAFETY REPRESENTATIVE TO ENSURE THAT PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT IS CORRECTLY CHECKED, STORED AND MAINTAINED!

69 P.P.E. COMPLIANCE Employer Assess workplace for hazards Provide PPE
Determine when to use Provide PPE training for employees and instruction in proper use Employee - Use PPE in accordance with training received and other instructions. - Inspect daily and maintain in a clean and reliable condition.

70 Establishing a PPE Program
Procedures for selecting, providing, training, and using PPE as part of an employer’s routine operation Assess the workplace to determine if hazards are present, or are likely to be present, which necessitate the use of PPE Select the proper PPE Train employees who are required to use the PPE If all feasible engineering and work practice controls are in place, but employees are still exposed to potential hazards, PPE must be provided. See Checklist A in OSHA Publication 3151, Assessing the Need for PPE, A Guide for Small Business Employers, to establish a PPE program. * Identify steps taken to assess potential hazards in every employee’s work space and in workplace operating procedures * Identify appropriate PPE selection criteria * Identify how you will train employees on the use of PPE, including * What PPE is necessary and when it’s necessary * How to properly inspect PPE for wear or damage and how to care & store it * How to properly put on, adjust the fit, and take off PPE * The limitations of the PPE * Identify how you will assess employee understanding of PPE training * Identify how you will enforce proper PPE use * Identify how you will provide for any required medical examinations Identify how and when to evaluate the PPE program

71 Training Employees required to use PPE must be trained to know at least the following: Why training is necessary? When PPE is necessary How will it protect them? What are its limitations? What type of PPE is necessary? How to properly put on, take off, adjust and wear the PPE Each affected employee must demonstrate an understanding of the required training, and the ability to use PPE properly, before being allowed to perform work requiring the use of PPE. When the employee does not have the required skill and understanding, retraining is required. NOTE : Instructor should take in some PPE for class – hearing, glasses, H.HAT, S.Harness, respirator and demonstrate and how to use properly

72 Training Proper care and maintenance of the PPE
How to clean and disinfect? How to identify signs of wear? What is its useful life & how is it disposed? Each affected employee must demonstrate an understanding of the required training, and the ability to use PPE properly, before being allowed to perform work requiring the use of PPE. When the employee does not have the required skill and understanding, retraining is required.

73 Who Pays for PPE? On November 14, 2007, OSHA announced a new rule requiring employers to pay for almost all personal protective equipment that is required by OSHA’s general industry, construction, and maritime standards. Many employers already pay for approximately 95% of the employees PPE. The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced a final rule on employer-paid personal protective equipment (PPE). Under the rule, all PPE, with a few exceptions, will be provided at no cost to the employee. OSHA anticipates that this rule will have substantial safety benefits that will result in more than 21,000 fewer occupational injuries per year. The rule will be published in the Federal Register on November 15, 2007.

74 Who Pays for PPE? Employee-owner PPE and replacement PPE:
When an employee provides his/her own PPE, the employer must ensure that the equipment is adequate to protect the employee from hazards at the workplace. The employer is required to pay for replacement PPE used to comply with OSHA standards. However, when an employee has lost or intentionally damaged PPE, the employer is not required to pay for its replacement. The employer must pay for replacement PPE, except when the employee has lost or intentionally damaged the PPE. Where an employee provides adequate protective equipment he or she owns pursuant to paragraph (b) of this section, the employer may allow the employee to use it and is not required to reimburse the employee for that equipment. The employer shall not require an employee to provide or pay for his or her own PPE, unless the PPE is excepted by paragraphs (h)(2) through (h)(5) of this section. This paragraph (h) became effective on February 13, 2008.

75 PPE Summary Assess the workplace for hazards.
Employers must implement a PPE program where they: Assess the workplace for hazards. Use engineering and work practice controls to eliminate or reduce hazards before using PPE. Select appropriate PPE to protect employees from hazards that cannot be eliminated. Inform employees why the PPE is necessary, how and when it must be worn. Train employees how to use and care for their PPE, including how to recognize deterioration and failure. Require employees to wear selected PPE. OSHA Publication 3151, Assessing the Need for Personal Protective Equipment: A Guide for Small Business Employers. It is available at OSHA’s home page (www.osha.gov), or for sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC.

76 Emergency Action Plans and Procedures - Fire, life safety and first aid issues
CONTIGENCY PLAN FOR SEVERE WEATHER & OTHER EMERGENCY RESPONSE SITUATIONS An emergency response plan is a living document and will be changed as conditions and personnel change. It will be the responsibility of the HS manager to update the Emergency plan and to keep the material current. I. INTRODUCTION This plan provides guidance to employees at the MECT 3&4 site and future buildings concerning emergency actions and provides a clear statement of required employee responses during an emergency. II. REPORTING AN EMERGENCY The person who discovers an emergency should use any of the following methods for prompt notification: 1. Telephone: ( ) or 911 and then (Dave Wells –ECC H&S) 2. Sound blast horn - 3 blasts to notify evacuation to Rally point by the III. PROTECTIVE ACTIONS 1. Sheltering-in-place. Sheltering-in-place is the primary protective action in response to most hazardous material releases. Notification of sheltering-in-place normally will be announced over the emergency notification system. Sheltering-in-place requires employees to: Go indoors immediately. Close all windows and doors. Turn off all sources of outdoor air (fans, air conditioners, ventilation system). Copy of emergency action plan in files ---This is what the first page looks like.

77 In addition to Fires, and medical emergencies we also need to address:
Emergency Action Plans and Procedures - Fire, life safety and first aid issues In addition to Fires, and medical emergencies we also need to address: Different severe weather conditions –Tornadoes, Hurricanes, lightning, earthquake, floods, etc. Bomb Threats Violent Employee or Site Shooter We need to address the type of potential emergency Personnel Accountability – Who does what in each type of emergency Who all needs to be Notified and WRITTEN PLANS must have all needed phone numbers.

78 Four Elements Of a Workplace Safety Program
Element 1 - Management, Leadership and Employee Involvement. Element 2, 3 – Worksite Analysis and Hazard Prevention and Control. Element 4 – Safety and Health Training and Education Class 2 Instructor should take EM manual, copy of Actual APP Plan, AHA printed out

79 Establishing a Safety and Health Training Program
Today we are going to look at: New Employee Orientation – View an actual Orientation film Activity Hazard Analysis for every task performed and how to write them. A Written Safety Program – What it should look like. Trade or equipment specific safety training. OSHA hour Training Classes First Aid /CPR/AED/Blood Borne Pathogen WEEK #3 - Establishing you Safety and Health Training Program INTRO - This week we wrap it up and talk about specific training needed

80 New Employee Orientation
Needs to include: Emergency Contacts- emergency plan, evacuation procedures, meeting places When & where daily safety meetings are held Deal w/ Harassment, Fighting, Horseplay – Zero Tolerance- Removal from site Firearms, weapons, drugs or alcohol prohibited & site testing policies Hazard Communications Employee Responsibilities- Report ALL Accidents, no matter how slight - this allows for prompt medical attention, and investigation and elimination of the cause that may place others in harm's way. Accidents must be reported to Employee's immediate supervisor and ECC personnel. Immediately correct or report any unsafe condition or hazard noted in the workplace. Employees must support the Zero Accident philosophy to assist us to provide an injury free workplace. Employees are responsible to ask questions when they do not understand. Lack of knowledge is the greatest cause of accidents in the workplace. Report to work "FIT FOR DUTY" Report the use of prescription medication that may have an effect on their ability to safely perform tasks or operate equipment. Hand out the Employee Guide to Safety rules and regulations.

81 New Employee Orientation
Needs to include: Personal Protective Equipment Requirements Required Work Clothing Rigging Fall Protection – 100% at all times when there is fall potential of 6 feet or more Scaffolding Fork Lift, Scissor and Boom Lift Operation requirements LOCKOUT/TAGOUT PROCEDURES Ladder Safety Electrical Safety Housekeeping Fire Protection Floor Openings Overhead Hazards Heavy Equipment Other Hazards & Controls- No cell phones while operating equipment Activity Hazard Analysis Quality Control Issues Any other site specific rules – Smoking, eating, radios, Phones, visitors These are the bare minimums - More site specific issues must be reviewed VIEW PROVIDED SITE ORIENTATION VIDEO AT THIS TIME ……Take Quiz and…DISCUSSION AFTER

82 What have we learned so far?
Must first establish a Safety Statement, work on developing a Safety Culture by following key safety principles, set goals and maintain a commitment for maintaining an Incident Free Environment. Implementation of the Safety Program involves all workers, from top management to all workers and Supervisors are a key component to making it work. A supervisor or other individual can be assigned Specific responsibilities and can head up a company safety committee that works on developing the safety plans and programs. The safety committee also reviews all incidents, accidents, near misses to determine contributing factors. While focusing on determining causes, it must always be remembered that the overall GOAL is to prevent similar Accidents from happening again. Worksite Analysis are frequently needed and Audits and Inspections help us identify issues and corrective actions can be made prior to an incident happening. We must develop Standard Operating Procedures to give workers a plan to guide their work.

83 What have we learned so far?
A big part of the work place analysis comes thru education of all workers to the hazards of chemicals and is addressed thru training employees on Hazardous Communication Standards Understanding the Hierarchy of controls: Engineering – Management – Personal Protective Equipment . We have learned that when exposure to hazards cannot be engineered out of normal operations and when safe work practices and administrative controls don’t provide sufficient protection ….then Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) may be required to keep our workers safe. We just looked at the essential need for New Employee Safety Orientations. How many of you do or would like to do government contract work? ……. Lets talk a little about this type of work ….being as we are in a MILITARY TOWN.

84 SAFETY on Department of Defense CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS
Most government contracts incorporate by reference a number of federal acquisition regulation (FAR) clauses that describe a variety of routine requirements. The clause that is most significant with respect to construction safety is FAR clause (c), which states that "if this contract is for construction or dismantling, demolition or removal of improvements with any Department of Defense agency or component, the contractor shall comply with all pertinent provisions of the latest version U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Safety and Health Requirements Manual EM in effect on the date of the solicitation."

85 SAFETY on Department of Defense CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS
While many of the requirements of EM 385 closely parallel OSHA's requirements, there are 2 notable differences: 1. Specific requirements for a written site-specific accident prevention plan. 2. The development of activity hazard analyses that identify potential hazards by each phase of a construction project & identify the precautions the contractor will take to control those hazards These two things will drive and guide all work on a DOD Project.

86 Written Accident Prevention Plans
The accident prevention plan required by EM 385 is not some vague, generic document typical of many construction companies that lists general safety rules such as prohibiting horseplay, or possession of firearms, alcoholic beverages or illicit drugs on the job, and mandatory wearing of long-sleeved shirts, hard hats and safety glasses. Rather, it must be a detailed, site-specific written plan that describes the management processes that will be used to prevent accidents from occurring on a specific construction project.

87 Written Accident Prevention Plans
It is a written plan that explains how a contractor intends to prevent accidents from occurring on a specific construction project. Have the copy to show how big and detailed it is

88 Written Accident Prevention Plans
Unlike OSHA requirements, EM 385 requires that company officials responsible for specific aspects of the plan be identified. For example, note that element 1, the signature sheet, requires the title, signature and phone number of the person who prepared the plan, the person who approved the plan and any individuals who concurred with the plan. Such information would allow DoD contracting officers, project managers or safety specialists to identify specific company personnel that could answer questions concerning the plan or, more importantly, discuss problems concerning its implementation. Written accident plans are one added issue if doing government work…….The other is AHA’s or Activity Hazard Analysis * Discuss 3-Phase Inspection process, Preparatory Meetings, Inspections and other government requirements before work can even start. SUBMITTALS of all materials in addition to safety plans must be approved by government before any work can start.

89 Written Accident Prevention Plans
Accident reporting, must address who, how and when information will be provided on exposure data such as man hours worked that can be used to evaluate safety performance, how major accidents will be reported, who will conduct accident investigations, and how and when reports and logs will be completed.

90 Written Accident Prevention Plans
Vague generic safety and health programs will not meet the job-specific requirements of EM Probably the biggest step to be learned is next. AHA Process

91 Conducting An Effective
Activity Hazard Analysis An introduction to the “Five Step Process” of Activity Hazard Analysis (AHA) Using the 5 step AHA process to analyze their work activities will help them identify the tools, materials and equipment they will need, develop work methods and procedures for accomplishing the task, identify existing and potential hazards, assessing the probability and risk and perhaps most importantly identifying methods to eliminate or protect against any hazards

92 Activity Hazard Analysis
If the accident prevention plan is viewed as the strategic guide for accident prevention….. Activity Hazard Analysis might be seen as the tactical guide. Section 01.A.09 of EM states that "activity hazard analyses shall be prepared by the contractors performing the work activity."

93 Activity Hazard Analysis
Activity hazard analysis requires contractors to be proactive in aggressively identifying hazards that can be anticipated and controlling them rather than looking back with 20/20 hindsight.

94 Activity Hazard Analysis - Key Terms
What’s the Job or Activity? What are the Hazards? What’s an exposure? What is Analysis? To make the workplace safer , determine where and what and how a worker is likely to become injured or ill BEFORE it occurs AHA/ JHA – copy in your binder - Lets Discuss - Ask the group to answer. What is a Job? Any activity (mental or physical or both) that has been assigned to an employee as a responsibility and carries with it both positive and/or negative consequences based on the performance of that job. What is a Hazard? A unsafe condition or practice that could cause injury, illness, or property damage and is preventable. What is an “exposure”? When an employee enters a “danger zone” by virtue of their proximity to the hazard. What is Analysis? The breaking down of a job into its component steps and then evaluating of each step, looking for hazards. Each hazard is then corrected or a method of worker protection (safe practice or PPE) is identified and made a standard of operation.

95 Activity Workers in their first year with their employer account for more than 50% of disabling claims. Why? ( list three possible explanations ) Answer should at least include these answers: Lack of knowledge * Lack of physical ability * Cultural perception of what is acceptable behavior and what is not * Prior training that included unsafe practices

96 AHA Purpose Effective AHA’s help the employer recognize and control hazards and exposures in the workplace. How might the employee’s perception of a “hazard” differ from that of the employer or supervisor? How does the employee’s perception of a “hazard” possibly differ from that of the supervisor or employer? The employee sees a hazard and wants the supervisor and/or employer to address it right away because the employee may feel threatened or at risk. The supervisor or employer may desire to address the hazard quickly but is often slowed down by the process. Answers to critical questions must be identified. Questions like - is it a real problem - how big a problem is it - what are the options - what is the best way to correct it - who is going to correct it - how long will it take - how much will it cost - is additional training needed .

97 Activity Why is an AHA more effective than walk-around inspections in reducing accidents in the workplace? Why is AHA more effective than walk-around inspections? When used as hazard recognition, awareness, and training aids, AHA’s help to set performance standards, assist in standardization of the operations based on acceptable safe practices and PPE, and provides a form of documentation regarding the employee’s knowledge of the job requirements.

98 Probability Probability is defined as: the chance that a given event will occur. We need to determine if Probability of an accident is low-medium or high and if HIGH- the chances are very likely that an accident could occur. Explain probability Compare and contrast probability to luck. Instructor could use examples such as the lottery or slot machines to develop an understanding. For example, with slot machines the higher the coin amount (nickels, quarters, dollars, etc.. ) the more coins (1,2 or 3) played at one time the higher the probability of winning a jack pot. Accidents are similar. The greater the hazard or chances taken, and the more often they are taken the greater the probability of an accident. This time the prize will be pain and suffering, the loss of a limb or body part or perhaps the biggest jackpot “Death” Just as more people lose than win at the casinos, Risk takers on the job will also eventually lose. The odds are against short cuts, poor work habits, and unsafe practices

99 Activity Hazard Analysis STEP 1
Step One - Watch the work being done What are some effective methods to watch the work being done? This slide begins the explanation of how to conduct or develop an AHA. The purpose is to bring the students to a common understanding of how to begin. The “fix-the-system” culture is one that makes every effort to address the hazards in the workplace by first identifying the hazardous condition or practice, analyzing the hazard to determine the root cause and then eliminate those hazards by correcting the deficiencies in the system. (could include supervisor training, improved accountability system, establishment of standards of performance at all levels, to name a few.) What are some effective methods to watch the work being done? Video, observation, photos, sketches.

100 Activity Hazard Analysis STEP 1
Step One - Watch the work being done Why is it important to involve the employee? Why is it important to involve the employee? A couple of things here: First it can help the observer better understand the process that is taking place. Second, the more involved the employees are in the development stage, the better the chances of buy-in on their part. Also they are often the experts doing the work…. Why is a “fix-the-system” culture so important to the AHA process? The AHA process has more than one goal. 1. It provides an organized approach for the evaluation of a process. 2. Once the hazards and corrective actions are identified, the AHA becomes a vehicle by which the employer can mesh the desired “Safe Behavior” into the normal operating procedure: The only way to do the job is to do it safely. 3. Once “root causes” have been identified in the AHA development process, these can be addressed thus “fixing” the system that brought the hazardous condition or unsafe practice into the workplace.

101 AHA Step Two - Break the job down into steps
COE EM para 01.A.13.b: Work will not begin until the hazard analysis for the work activity has been accepted by the Government’s designated authority and discussed with all engaged in the activity, including the contractor, subcontractor(s), and Government on-site representative. “Principle Steps” column identify “Sequences of Work” Distribution, etc. Contractor “Construction Schedule or Construction Progress Chart” is a good guide to identify “Sequences of Work” NOTE: Talk about Federal jobs and if doing there are stricter guidelines. The second step is to break the job down into steps. The introduction to the “breaking down” process is covered through a brief discussion of the “Job Hazard Analysis Worksheet” and how it helps in the organization of the process. Some key points to be covered are as follows: The top of the first page of the AHA is a tracking device for easy location of the job and documentation of the analysis. Job Description: The every day language version that everyone can understand: (example: Changing a tire, Mixing Concrete, Packing cartons, Trimming defects from a product.) * A good job is broken down into steps. If the AHA ends up with more than 15 steps then it is too complex. If this is the case, the AHA must be broken down into phases (phase 1 and phase 2 etc….) The suggested AHA worksheet allows for up to 15 steps (five on each of 3 pages) * Each step of the job is identified and written in on the worksheet. All of the steps should be identified before moving on to the Hazards. * Each step is now broken down to identify the hazard. The hazards are listed under each step. Once all of the hazards and operational concerns have been identified for all of the steps, then the “Control Measures” for each hazard are recorded. These control measures become the operational expectation.

102 AHA Step 3 Step Three - Describe the hazards in each step of the task.
One of the primary purposes of the AHA is to make the job safer. The information gathered in this step will be valuable in helping to eliminate and/or reduce hazards associated with the job, and improve the system weaknesses that produced them. Describe the hazards in each step of the task. Once the steps have been identified, then the hazards are to be identified and described. Example: Changing A Tire Step 1: Make sure the car is parked off the road and clear of traffic Hazard(s) Control Measure(s) Required Mechanical (struck by)

103 POTENTIAL SAFETY / HEALTH HAZARDS
AHA Step 3 PRINCIPAL STEPS POTENTIAL SAFETY / HEALTH HAZARDS RECOMMENDED CONTROLS (Note: Standard PPE required for this activity includes Hard Hat, Safety glasses with side protection, and safety-toe footwear. Additional PPE requirements are listed in this column depending on the hazard. This constitutes the Workplace Hazard Assessment per 29 CFR Additional assessments and PPE selection when needed will be documented on a JSA or daily briefing sign-in form and signed by the SSHO in accordance with ECC SOP ESQ Hazard assessment and respirator selection for inhalation hazards are documented in the site Respiratory Protection Plan.) Slinging, lifting and landing loads Load shifts, crushing. Ensure proper rigging is used Ensure employees are clear of load Ensure a tag-line is used Make sure lifting gear (wire rope chokers, nylon straps, shackles) are all of adequate capacity for loads and that slings and attachments are stored correctly. All rigging equipment must be tagged. If not tagged, must be taken out of service. Any power or electrical work Contact with or Exposure to electricity Electric shock Electrocution GFCI’s are mandatory in the use of any and all electrical tools and/or equipment. Electric power tools and equipment will be grounded or double insulated. Inspect all power tools and electric flexible cords daily prior to use to ensure insulation and plug connections are intact. Do not use damaged or defective power tools. Power tools with spliced or tapped cords will be tagged “Do Not Use” and removed from site immediately. Deck Installation Falls, Pinch Points, Drops 100% Tie off while decking if parapet wall is under 42 inches. Never walk backwards with deck to avoid falling in the hole Always keep hands on decking and set down, no “slinging” of deck Grinding Eye protection, hand protection Use face shield and gloves while grinding to avoid sparks or small pieces of metal from getting in the eye or striking the face or hand Hot work permit required for all spark producing tools daily with fire watch. Operate welding and cutting machines Injury to eyes Burns Shock Inhalation of fumes Starting fire Distractions Pollution to the environment Obtain fire permit-If not already on existing HOT permit, obtain new fire permit. Follow all conditions of permit (fire watch, fire extinguisher, etc.) Inspect your equipment and ensure it is working properly and in good condition. Use proper PPE (eye shields/welding helmets/clothing/gloves) Ensure enough ventilation. Use smoke extractors if necessary. Use barricades/barricade tape to prevent vehicle or pedestrian traffic through work area Only personnel trained and qualified to operate welding equipment should do so. Properly dispose of cutting and welding spoils. “Potential Hazard” column can have “General Safety” as a potential hazard to include minimal PPE . “General Safety” should be identified for every phase of work.

104 Identifying types of hazards
Acceleration: When we speed up or slow down too quickly Toxic: Toxic to skin and internal organs. Radiation: Non-ionizing - burns, Ionizing - destroys tissue. Many different types of hazards may be present – We need to identify all.

105 Identifying types of hazards
Ergonomics: Eight risk factors 1. High Frequency; 2. High Duration; 3. High Force; 4. Posture; 5. Point of Operation; 6. Mechanical Pressure; 7. Vibration; 8. Environmental Exposure. In the office or field office

106 Identifying types of hazards
Pressure: Increased pressure in hydraulic and pneumatic systems. Mechanical: Pinch points, sharp points and edges, weight, rotating parts, stability, ejected parts and materials, impact. Flammability/Fire: In order for combustion to take place, the fuel and oxidizer must be present in gaseous form.

107 Identifying types of hazards
Biological: Primarily airborne and blood borne viruses. Violence In The Workplace: Any violent act that occurs in the workplace and creates a hostile work environment that affects employees’ physical or psychological well-being.

108 Identifying types of hazards
Explosives: Explosions result in large amounts of gas, heat, noise, light and over-pressure. Electrical Contact: Inadequate insulation, broken electrical lines or equipment, lightning strike, static discharge etc. Chemical Reactions: Chemical reactions can be violent, can cause explosions, dispersion of materials and emission of heat.

109 Accident Types Struck-by:
A person is forcefully struck by an object. The force of contact is provided by the object. Struck-against: A person forcefully strikes an object. The person provides the force or energy. Contact-by: Contact by a substance or material that, by its very nature, is harmful and causes injury.

110 Accident Types Contact-with:
A person comes in contact with a harmful substance or material. The person initiates the contact. Caught-on: A person or part of his/her clothing or equipment is caught on an object that is either moving or stationary. This may cause the person to lose his/her balance and fall, be pulled into a machine, or suffer some other harm. Caught-in: A person or part of him/her is trapped, or otherwise caught in an opening or enclosure.

111 Accident Types Caught-between:
A person is crushed, pinched or otherwise caught between a moving and a stationary object, or between two moving objects. Fall-to-surface: A person slips or trips and falls to the surface he/she is standing or walking on. Fall-to-below: A person slips or trips and falls to a level below the one he/she was walking or standing on.

112 Accident Types Over-exertion:
A person over-extends or strains himself/herself while performing work. Bodily reaction: Caused solely from stress imposed by free movement of the body or assumption of a strained or unnatural body position. A leading source of injury. Over-exposure: Over a period of time, a person is exposed to harmful energy (noise, heat), lack of energy (cold), or substances (toxic chemicals/atmospheres).

113 Step 4 – Control Measures
It is now time to identify the desired control Measures for each Hazard. To help you come up with ideas for the best solution ask the following: (a) How can the conditions be changed to eliminate the hazard? (b) What can the employee do to prevent an accident or eliminate the hazard? The “Control Measures” are recorded on the worksheet for each hazard that is identified. These controls may include procedures, practices, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), etc. Refer to the Hierarchy of Controls on the next couple of pages. “Recommended Controls” column identify site specific control measures to be implemented to eliminate or reduce each hazard identified in the “Potential Hazard” column to an acceptable level.

114 Engineering Controls Consist of substitution, isolation, ventilation, and equipment modification. These controls focus on the source of the hazard, unlike other types of controls that generally focus on the employee exposed to the hazard. The basic concept behind engineering controls is that, to the extent feasible, the work environment and the job itself should be designed to eliminate hazards or reduce exposure to hazards

115 Management Controls Management controls may result in a reduction of exposure through such methods as changing work habits, improving sanitation and hygiene practices, or making other changes in the way the employee performs the job.

116 Personal Protective Equipment
When exposure to hazards cannot be engineered completely out of normal operations or maintenance work, and when safe work practices and administrative controls cannot provide sufficient additional protection from exposure, personal protective clothing and/or equipment may be required.

117 Step Five – Safe Operating Procedure
List the competent person here List training requirements for the phase of work such as fall protection, confined space, HAZCOM, qualified equipment operators, safe use of ladders, HAZWOPER, etc. List equipment to be used for the phase of work such as crane, backhoe, powder actuated tools, electric saws/drill, etc.

118 LETS BUILD AN AHA This is what my first page always looks like - I list the across the board requirements that must be in place for any work on site. These items will never change.

119 LETS BUILD AN AHA 1. Example: Changing A Tire
Step 1: Make sure the car is parked off the road and clear of traffic Hazard(s) Control Measure(s) Required Mechanical (struck by) Administrative: Check side and review mirrors Get the group to build the AHA – Pass out blank AHA sheet

120 EM 385 vs. OSHA Requirements
EM 385 includes some more stringent technical provisions than CFR 1926. In particular, the level of emphasis that EM 385 places on employee training and job site inspections suggests that EM 385 views these two elements as being critical for preventing accidents. This makes sense because employee training is crucial for informing employees of the potential hazards to which they are exposed and the precautions that should be taken to mitigate those hazards, especially those that are not particularly obvious. As we wind down …..lets look at a few more differences between OSHA and EM

121 EM 385 vs. OSHA Requirements
EM 385 includes provisions for ongoing training, specifically section 01.B.03 which requires that "safety meetings shall be conducted to review past activities, plan for new or changed operations, review pertinent aspects of appropriate activity hazards analyses (by trade), establish safe working procedures for anticipated hazards, and provide pertinent safety and health training and motivation." Meeting must be held at least once a week………. As we wind down …..lets look at a few more differences between OSHA and EM

122 EM 385 vs. OSHA Requirements
Some other areas of stricter compliance in EM 385 are in areas such as : * Confined Space procedures * Cumulative Trauma Prevention. * Operations of All- Terrain Vehicles * Lock-out / Tag-out Each project is different and depending on the USACE QA, some areas of enforcement may be much stricter than on others, but ultimately the EM must be your guideline for site H&S compliance in addition to any OSHA, city, state and any other applicable regulations. An online copy of EM 385 may be found at

123 Four Elements Of a Workplace Safety Program
Element #1 - Management, Leadership and Employee Involvement. Element #2, 3 – Worksite Analysis and Hazard Prevention and Control. Element #4 – Safety and Health Training and Education. Over the next 3 weeks we will look at these three in detail - Our GOAL IS THAT SUPERVISORS WILL BE BETTER ABLE TO IMPLEMENT SAFETY PROGRAMS INTO THEIR ROUTINE OPERATIONS….. We have a number of different types of businesses represented here and we want everyone to learn techniques to help improve safety for your specific organization…….We want everyone to decrease job related injuries, illnesses and fatalities. This is a new proto type program…..so it will change based on your input and comments and recommendations. We value your input and request that you ask questions. If we don’t have time during class, we will be glad to stay after and my will be available for any needing further information. Today we begin with ….Management, leadership and Employee Involvement

124 REVIEW: What have we learned about developing a Safety Program
A written APP can benefit our bottom line and the end result will depend on how well you implement your APP and manage your programs. Management must commit to safety and participate if APP is to get results. Written Safety Policy statement to get employee awareness & involvement . Displaying the required OSHA posters. Recordkeeping- Document everything Safety Analysis – Goal is to Eliminate Hazards - AHAs Health & Safety Training – Supervisor Key – All must be trained- Orientations Safety Inspection Immediate Accident Reporting and Accident Investigations Program Reviews Over the next 3 weeks we will look at these three in detail - Our GOAL IS THAT SUPERVISORS WILL BE BETTER ABLE TO IMPLEMENT SAFETY PROGRAMS INTO THEIR ROUTINE OPERATIONS….. We have a number of different types of businesses represented here and we want everyone to learn techniques to help improve safety for your specific organization…….We want everyone to decrease job related injuries, illnesses and fatalities. This is a new proto type program…..so it will change based on your input and comments and recommendations. We value your input and request that you ask questions. If we don’t have time during class, we will be glad to stay after and my will be available for any needing further information. Today we begin with ….Management, leadership and Employee Involvement

125 IT’S JUST THE BEGINNING
NO IT’S NOT THE END IT’S JUST THE BEGINNING

126 Abbreviations AHA – Activity Hazard Analysis
APP – Accident Prevention Plan BMP - Best management practices PPE – Personal Protective Equipment DOD – Department of Defense OSH – Occupational Safety and Health Program OSHA – Occupational Safety and Health Administration 29 CFR – Code of Federal RegulationsHazWoper - 29 CFR the OSHA / EPA requirement to have all employees trained if they will be handling, managing or shipping hazardous wastes. USACE – United States Army Corps of Engineers NFPA – National fire protection axsociation PEL – Permissable exposure limit RMP – Risk Management Plan EPA – Environmental Protection Agency

127 EXTRAS Power Points – “Creating a Safety program for your small buisness”, Competent person, confined space entry, office safety, lighting plan, safety orientation in Spanish, eye safety, basic Electrical safety, Safety Representatives Training, Safety Supervisor training, Safety Audits, Supervisors and managers responsibilities, Scaffold awareness Training, LockOut/TagOut standard. Numerous Safety Forms - SOP’s on LOTO, Fire Protection, Hand and Power tools, Deficiency tracking log, Assured Grounding Program, ECCO SLIP reporting form, AHA’s, Equipment inspection forms, daily excavation/trench form, Equipment inspection stickers, fire extinguisher inspection forms, Crane inspection forms, Equipment operator qualification forms, Demolition check list, contractors visitor sign in sheet, confined space Pre-entry check list, HASP compliance agreement form, Safety audits and SITE INSPECTION PROGRAM INSTRUCTIONS, Focus on 4 Poster, 1st aid log in sheet, Tailgate meeting sign in sheet, PLAN OF THE DAY FORM, EM crane critical lift ck. List. ALSO, Sub-contractors Prequalification Packet for DOD work, Safety Orientation in English/Spanish, Generic Health and Safety plan, Blank Accident Prevention plan, and A sub-contractor Packet that needs filled in prior to working on DOD site. If time permits and you need more info ….Use the Competent Person PP that is attached


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