Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Page 1 Louis-Benoit Desroches Energy Efficiency Standards Group Energy Analysis Department, LBNL Appliance Standards.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Page 1 Louis-Benoit Desroches Energy Efficiency Standards Group Energy Analysis Department, LBNL Appliance Standards."— Presentation transcript:

1 page 1 Louis-Benoit Desroches Energy Efficiency Standards Group Energy Analysis Department, LBNL Appliance Standards and Advanced Technologies APS Physics of Sustainable Energy II March 6,

2 page 2 Energy Demand in the U.S.

3 page 3 Annual U.S. Primary Energy Consumption Standards affect products using >80% of residential and >60% of commercial buildings primary energy

4 page 4 Residential Electric Savings APS (2008). Energy Future: Think Efficiency

5 page 5 U.S. Standards Program Establish Standards New standards for a product are intended to achieve the maximum efficiency that is technologically feasibleand economically justified, and to have significant energy savings. The Secretary of Energyweighs the benefits and burdens of standards in selecting the level of stringency. Open Process involving Stakeholders The process of developing standards is intended to be open, involving stakeholders as active participants and fostering consensus. Analysis includes engineering, LCC, NIA, MIA, utility impacts, environmental assessments, and RIA

6 page 6 Impacts Vary Depending upon Equipment Price, Energy Prices, and Usage Behavior Example: Clothes washer standard reduces energy 22% in year % of households have net savings; 10% have net costs Mean impact = $103 savings (6%) Range of impacts is from $808 savings to $126 cost per household Average baseline LCC = $1633

7 page 7 U.S. Appliance Standards Are Based on Engineering-Economic Analysis Statistical-EU Top-runner-Japan DOE-US liters Targets can go beyond current models

8 page 8 Six Final Rules in Products with standards prescribed by EISA 2007 Ranges and Ovens General Service Fluorescent Lamps (GSFL) and Infrared (IRL) Lamps Commercial Package Boilers and Very Large Commercial Package Air- conditioners & Heat Pumps Refrigerated Beverage Vending Machines Commercial Clothes Washers Five Final Rules in 2010 Water Heaters (Residential)(COMPLETED) Direct Heating Equipment (COMPLETED) Pool Heaters (COMPLETED) Small Electric Motors (COMPLETED) Refrigerators (pending) Ten Final Rules in 2011 Microwave Ovens Residential Furnaces Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts Clothes Dryers (Residential) Room Air Conditioners Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps (Residential) Battery Chargers External Power Supplies (Class A) ER, BR, and Small Diameter Incandescent Reflector Lamps Residential Clothes Washers Ongoing Rules Furnace Fans DistributionTransformers MH Lamp Fixtures HID Lamps Residential Dishwashers and more….. Rulemaking Activities 2.81 quads $2.0B 7%) 164 MMT CO quads $5.3B 7%) 112 MMT CO 2

9 Energy Research at DOE: Was It Worth It? National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council (2001) Primary Energy Savings =9% of 2025 residential energy use Carbon Reductionsin 2025 =132 million metric tons CO 2 /year Additional $48 billion in savings from energy efficiency standards for 9 residential products NAS estimate of economic benefits of Energy Efficiency R&D assigns $30 billion in savings (including $23 billion to LBNL technologies) DOE spent $7.3 billion on EE R&D, cumulative DOE spent ~$0.3 billion on energy efficiency standards, cumulative

10 page 10 Impacts from Existing Standards Neubauer et al. (2009). Ka-BOOM! The Power of Appliance Standards. ASAP-7/ACEEE-A091

11 page 11 Impacts from Upcoming Standards Neubauer et al. (2009). Ka-BOOM! The Power of Appliance Standards. ASAP-7/ACEEE-A091

12 page 12 Impacts from Existing and New Stds Neubauer et al. (2009). Ka-BOOM! The Power of Appliance Standards. ASAP-7/ACEEE-A091

13 page 13 U.S. Average Energy Use per New Appliance Index relative to 1972 = 100 Effective Dates of National Standards Effective Dates of State Standards = = Gas Furnace-25% Central air conditioner– 50% Refrigerator-70%

14 page 14 Refrigerators in the U.S. Source: David Goldstein

15 page 15 Appliance Price Histories Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

16 page 16 Some examples of advanced technologies……

17 page 17 Refrigerators Source: Sun Frost

18 page 18 Air Conditioning Source: Coolerado Source: Daikin AC Source: ECO-MAX

19 page 19 Integrated Systems Baxter et al. (2008), Development of a Small Integrated Heat Pump for Net-Zero Energy Homes, 9 th International IEA Heat Pump Conference.

20 page 20 Lighting Source: QD Vision Source: Ceravision Source: Philips But dont forget fluorescent lighting….

21 page 21 Televisions and Displays Source: QD Vision

22 page 22 Transformers Sources: Warner Power, Hexaformer

23 page 23 Clothes Dryers Nipkow& Bush (2009), Promotion of Energy-Efficient Heat Pump Dryers, EEDAL 09.

24 page 24 Clothes Washers Source: Xeros Ltd.

25 page 25 Network(ed) Equipment Source: IEEE P802.3az

26 page 26 Conclusions Energy efficiency has proven itself 30-year track record, technologically feasible, economically justified Standards and labels produced significant energy savings Economic benefits vastly exceed programmatic costs Affordable energy efficiency is a renewable resource Additional potential has been identified Will replace each generation of appliances, equipment, lighting Many interesting advanced technologies on the horizon, which can deliver significant savings


Download ppt "Page 1 Louis-Benoit Desroches Energy Efficiency Standards Group Energy Analysis Department, LBNL Appliance Standards."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google