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Designing for Difficulty: Social Pedagogy as a Design Framework for Liberal Education Randy Bass Georgetown University April 20, 2012 Indiana University.

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Presentation on theme: "Designing for Difficulty: Social Pedagogy as a Design Framework for Liberal Education Randy Bass Georgetown University April 20, 2012 Indiana University."— Presentation transcript:

1 Designing for Difficulty: Social Pedagogy as a Design Framework for Liberal Education Randy Bass Georgetown University April 20, 2012 Indiana University Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Seminar

2 Randy Bass and Heidi Elmendorf, Designing for Difficulty: Social Pedagogies as a Framework for Course Design in Undergraduate Education (White Paper, forthcoming, 2012) 2 Funded by the Teagle Foundation Working group and case studies from 24 faculty on 14 campuses

3 Why Social Pedagogies? 3 Digital stories created by students in general education history courses as a way of experiencing what it means to construct historical narrative. Senior Biology majors creating biology lesson plans for implementing in DC Public Schools as a way of deepening their knowledge of biology as their senior thesis.

4 What do they have in common? In each example, students are developing their knowledge in contexts that centrally ask them to think of their audience as someone other than the professor. 4

5 What do they have in common? In each example, learning is not only distinctly a social activity, but the implementation of social learning the act of constructing and communicating understanding to an authentic audience is a central part of the learning design of the course. 5

6 What do they have in common? In each example, the evidence of learning was not necessarily in the product. 6

7 Why social pedagogies? We believe it calls attention to an under- appreciated common thread of a growing range of effective pedagogical practices: the role of social learning as an essential and integrating component of rigorous course design that can achieve higher-end learning outcomes. 7

8 Chance favors the connected mind. 8

9 Steven Johnson Integrative thinking socially networked 9

10 She has to speak from a position of authority.

11

12 Threshold Concepts (Meyer and Land) Ways of knowing, acting, and speaking, and sometimes identity Instructional Bottlenecks (David Pace) Understanding where students get stuck based on disciplinary thinking

13 She has to speak from a position of authority.

14 Critical thinking? Inquiry and Analysis? Oral Communication? Written Communication? Integrative Learning? Lifelong Learning? Where do we find evidence of someone learning to speak from a position of authority?

15 Digital Stories https://commons.georgetown.edu/p rojects/digitalstories/

16 For whom were you writing? I thought if I had never heard of this then other people havent… I was definitely writing for my generation Im writing for others who had been tokenized I wrote it for myself. Im writing for women, and definitely for young girls

17 Social Pedagogies Framework 17

18 Social pedagogies design framework* * Randy Bass and Heidi Elmendorf, White Paper, Designing for Difficulty: Social Pedagogies as a Framework for Course Design in Undergraduate Education. 2012; Funded by the Teagle Foundation 18 We define social pedagogies as design approaches for teaching and learning that engage students with what we might call an authentic audience (other than the teacher), where the representation of knowledge for an audience is absolutely central to the construction of knowledge in a course. Social pedagogies build in iterative cycles of engagement with the most difficult material, and through a focus on authentic audience and representation of knowledge for others, help students deepen their understanding of core concepts by engaging in the ways of thinking, practicing, and communicating in a field. Ideally, social pedagogies strive to build a sense of intellectual community within the classroom and frequently connect students to communities outside the classroom.*

19 Social pedagogies design framework* Constructing and Communicating Understanding for an Authentic Audience * Randy Bass and Heidi Elmendorf, 2012; Funded by the Teagle Foundation Social Core 19

20 Constructing and Communicating Understanding for an Authentic Audience Communicating Understanding Authentic Audience Constructing Understanding Social Core Design Layer * Randy Bass and Heidi Elmendorf, 2012; Funded by the Teagle Foundation 20

21 Constructing and Communicating Understanding for an Authentic Audience Communicating Understanding Authentic Audience Constructing Understanding Social Core Design Layer * Randy Bass and Heidi Elmendorf, 2011; Funded by the Teagle Foundation The interdependence of the three layers… 21

22 Constructing and Communicating Understanding for an Authentic Audience Communicating Understanding Authentic Audience Constructing Understanding Social Core Design Layer * Randy Bass and Heidi Elmendorf, 2011; Funded by the Teagle Foundation 22 The interdependence of the three layers…

23 Constructing and Communicating Understanding for an Authentic Audience Deepened and contextualized understanding Communicating Understanding Authentic Audience Constructing Understanding Flexibility with knowledge in open-ended contexts Voice and a sense of purpose in a specific domain or community Ability to give and get feedback from multiple perspectives An integrated sense of intellectual and personal significance Social Core Design Layer Broad student learning outcomes * Randy Bass and Heidi Elmendorf, 2012; Funded by the Teagle Foundation 23

24 Three findings for the effective application of social pedagogies to course design… 1.You have to value social pedagogies centrally (have a social pedagogies ethos) even if social pedagogies constitute only one component of a course experience. 2.Social pedagogies require the alignment of a constellation of elements (i.e. linking knowledge, practice, audience, assessment) and rarely work well in isolation or as an add on to a course design. 3.If you have social pedagogies in a course they must be valued, somehow, in assessment to have value for students. * Randy Bass and Heidi Elmendorf, 2011; Funded by the Teagle Foundation 24

25 Constructing and Communicating Understanding for an Authentic Audience Deepened and contextualized understanding Communicating Understanding Authentic Audience Constructing Understanding Flexibility with knowledge in open-ended contexts Voice and a sense of purpose in a specific domain or community Ability to give and get feedback from multiple perspectives An integrated sense of intellectual and personal significance Social Core Design Layer Broad student learning outcomes * Randy Bass and Heidi Elmendorf, 2012; Funded by the Teagle Foundation 25

26 Case Study: Bioethics and Moral Imagination (Profs Bass and Little)

27 General education course: either Writing or Ethics 27 students Bioethics topics: Refusal of medical treatment Sexual refusal and Sexual flourishing Abortion Enhancement (cognitive, reproductive)

28 28

29 Initial Thoughts Survey 29

30 Personal Synthesis (halfway point) 30

31 Contraception Project 31

32 Contraception and Conscience 32

33 Contraception and Conscience 33 dually educate and engage readers to examine their own beliefs academic endeavor through a bioethical lens

34 Working Space: Wiki 34 Committed Catholic Positions Public Policy and Health Conscientious objection (medical)

35 Working Space: Wiki 35

36 Working Space: Wiki 36

37 Working Space: Wiki 37 Key Source Documents Empirical Data Thoughtful Perspectives

38 Building the site 38

39 Building the site 39

40 Working Space 40

41 Obama Video: Locating Evidence of Learning: Reflection (Blake, David, and Charlie)

42 : Bioethics and the Moral Imagination: Obama Video Annotation (Blake, David, Charlie)

43 Obama Video Annotation (Blake, David, Charlie)

44 Obama HHS Announcement Video

45

46 Working Space & Intermediate process 46

47 Where is evidence of learning? 47 And what is it that were looking for evidence of?

48 Web Literacy Assignment: Self Assessment

49 The Obama video would not have been possible without the collaborative work of David and Charlie. The three of us met on three occasions for several hours to hammer out drafts of the video. I believe I made a large contribution to this aspect of the project and took a lot of initiative during each meeting to make sure we each knew what to do. Furthermore, I made sure that our annotations were related to either bioethics or the video directly. I focused on the context and argument annotations. I believe both of these helped me further apply bioethical principles, including conscientious objection, individual liberties, and equal access. From the Self-assessment by one of the Obama video annotators: naming key concepts in bioethics intermediate choices were being made (but no examples)

50 Web Literacy Assignment: Self Assessment Working on the Obama video annotation and American Congress of Obstetricians Gynecologists source document analysis allowed me to apply concepts of bioethical analysis within this project. Through these two tasks I learned the importance of examining information without letting personal predispositions guide my thinking. It was important to stay unbiased and simply look at the sources from a perspective of explaining the meaning and adding more depth to the conversation. In the beginning this was more difficult, but as the project progressed, I learned how to do it with greater success. I think my work on the video and source document shows my ability to analyze information from an unbiased, bioethical perspective that aims to increase contemplation of the topic at hand. Beginning to address how this work helps with what is necessarily difficult in bioethical analysis?

51 Constructing and Communicating Understanding for an Authentic Audience Communicating Understanding Authentic Audience Constructing Understanding Social Core Design Layer * Randy Bass and Heidi Elmendorf, 2012; Funded by the Teagle Foundation 51

52 Constructing and Communicating Understanding for an Authentic Audience Communicating Understanding Authentic Audience Constructing Understanding Social Core Design Layer * Randy Bass and Heidi Elmendorf, 2011; Funded by the Teagle Foundation The interdependence of the three layers… 52

53 Constructing and Communicating Understanding for an Authentic Audience Communicating Understanding Authentic Audience Constructing Understanding Social Core Design Layer * Randy Bass and Heidi Elmendorf, 2011; Funded by the Teagle Foundation 53 The interdependence of the three layers…

54 Constructing and Communicating Understanding for an Authentic Audience Deepened and contextualized understanding Communicating Understanding Authentic Audience Constructing Understanding Flexibility with knowledge in open-ended contexts Voice and a sense of purpose in a specific domain or community Ability to give and get feedback from multiple perspectives An integrated sense of intellectual and personal significance Social Core Design Layer Broad student learning outcomes * Randy Bass and Heidi Elmendorf, 2012; Funded by the Teagle Foundation 54

55 Social Pedagogies and Questions of Evidence 55

56 The Formal Curriculum Informal Learning Participatory culture High-impact practices Experiential Co-curriculum

57 What are the shared and salient features of participatory cultures in Web-based environments? Jenkins, et. al., Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture (MacArthur Foundation, 2006) wikipedia Video gaming communities grass roots organizations fan sites

58 Participatory Culture of the Web Features of participatory culture – Low barriers to entry – Strong support for sharing ones contributions – Informal mentorship, experienced to novice – Members feel a sense of connection to each other – Students feel a sense of ownership of what is being created – Strong collective sense that something is at stake Jenkins, et. al., Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture (MacArthur Foundation, 2006)

59 Formal undergraduate curriculum Experiential co-curriculum Experiential co-curriculum Experiential co-curriculum

60 Formal undergraduate curriculum Experiential co-curriculum Experiential co-curriculum Experiential co-curriculum Study abroad Ug research Community- based learning

61 Formal undergraduate curriculum Experiential co-curriculum Experiential co-curriculum Experiential co-curriculum Study abroad Ug research Community- based learning $$$ Mission and Brand Core Practices Core Values

62 Formal undergraduate curriculum The recentered curriculum: from the perspective of high-impact learning And a percentage of other courses that student identify as transformative and/or highly engaging… High impact practices: First-year seminars Capstones Writing-intensive Courses w/ experiential component

63 Experiential co-curriculum The recentered curriculum: from the perspective of high impact learning Study abroad Undergraduate research Community- based learning Leadership Social entrepreneurship

64 High-impact experiential curriculum Formal undergraduate curriculum Experiential co-curriculum The recentered curriculum From the perspective of significant learning, this is the new center of higher education.

65 For a fuller treatment of that argument see a recent article in Educause Review, March/April 2012

66 High impact experiential curriculum Formal undergraduate curriculum Experiential co-curriculum Moving target… What does learning look like in this space? How do we design to capture it? Assess it?

67 High impact experiential curriculum Formal undergraduate curriculum Experiential co-curriculum The recentered curriculum Authentic Integrative Social Adaptive

68 High impact experiential curriculum Formal undergraduate curriculum Experiential co-curriculum The recentered curriculum: questions of evidence Authentic Integrative Social Adaptive Capture of intermediate stages Capturing and interpreting activity

69 NOVICE MIRACLE EXPERT product Connecting Intermediate Processes to Practice

70 NOVICE processes EXPERT practice LEARNING processes LEARNING processes How can we better understand these intermediate processes? How might we design to foster and capture them? evidence of process Connecting Intermediate Processes to Practice LEARNING processes Social pedagogies and intermediate processes…

71 (one version of) Learning Analytics 71 SNAPP Group:

72 (one version of) Learning Analytics 72 Blackboard Analytics / Bb Learn

73 Michael Smith & Ali Erkan, Ithaca College

74 Using Wikis to teach history Students work in collaborative teams to write history wiki-texts on subjects that interest them in historical context

75 Michael Smith & Ali Erkan, Ithaca College

76 High impact experiential curriculum Formal undergraduate curriculum Experiential co-curriculum The recentered curriculum: questions of evidence Authentic Integrative Social Adaptive Capture of intermediate stages Capturing and interpreting activity How to make meaning from experience: reflection

77 Comments 77 Thanks to: Margaret Olivia Little (Philosophy, Georgetown) Our students in Bioethics and the Moral Imagination Heidi Elmendorf (Biology, Georgetown) Steven Johnson, Where Good Ideas Come From, TED Ali Erkan and Michael Smith The Teagle Foundation


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