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Slide 1 U.S. Submarine Force Way Ahead. Slide 2 Submarine Force Situational Awareness Reduced DoD budget Little or no growth in shipbuilding account Diverging.

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Presentation on theme: "Slide 1 U.S. Submarine Force Way Ahead. Slide 2 Submarine Force Situational Awareness Reduced DoD budget Little or no growth in shipbuilding account Diverging."— Presentation transcript:

1 Slide 1 U.S. Submarine Force Way Ahead

2 Slide 2 Submarine Force Situational Awareness Reduced DoD budget Little or no growth in shipbuilding account Diverging trends –Increasing requirements and responsibilities –Diminishing resources Seamless leadership focus required Embark on a unifying effort

3 Slide 3 Integrated Undersea Warfare Submarines are asymmetric weapons Stealth is a force multiplier ASW is hard and getting harder –Submarines are the optimum ASW platform Anti-Access/Area Denial must be defeated –Submarine's unique access increasingly valuable to the Joint Force Adapt/leverage new payloads and sensors

4 Slide 4 Why Submarines in WWII Requisites: A National imperative - World War II Inadequacy of other platforms - Battle Force – Much of the Pacific Fleet is Out of Action Value added by distinctive submarine characteristics - Stealth, speed, endurance, and the right weapon Ability to step up to critical new roles - From Fleet Scouts to Anti-Surface Ship Warfare Hunter-Killers R&D contributions with mission-enabling capabilities - Continuous welds, Sonar, Radar, Mark 14 Torpedo Issues A strategy built around the submarine – Strangulation of Japan Capital Ships, Merchants, Tankers Submarines (1.6% of the Navy) Sunk 54.6% of all Japanese Ships Sunk During the War

5 Slide 5 Why Submarines in the Cold War Requisites: A National imperative - Cold War – Contain Communism Inadequacy of other platforms - ISR, Deterrence Value added by distinctive submarine characteristics - Stealth, speed, endurance Ability to step up to critical new roles - From Hunter-Killers to ISR, Strategic ASW and Strategic Deterrence R&D contributions with mission-enabling capabilities - Nuclear Power, Acoustic Quieting, Sonar, Ballistic Missiles, MK-48 torpedo A strategy built around the submarine – Control the Seas – Resupply Europe 1965 First Controlled Nuclear Chain Reaction First Fleet Ballistic Missile Underway on Nuclear Power" 41 For Freedom Construction Complete

6 Slide 6 Why Submarines Now and in the Future Requisites: A National imperative - Rise of Global challenges to U.S. Supremacy -Counter A2/AD Peer, IW, Regional Conflict, Sea Control, Piracy… Inadequacy of other platforms - Only submarines have assured access in A2AD environments Value added by distinctive submarine characteristics - Stealth, speed, endurance, modular payloads, COTs electronics Ability to step up to critical new roles -Strike, SOF Support, SEAD, Information Operations - Prompt Strike R&D contributions with mission-enabling capabilities - Photonics Mast, Unmanned Systems Integration, Ship Automation - Unmanned systems integration (UAVs, UUVs, DNS) A strategy built around the submarine - Sea Control / Sea Denial / Assured Access - Air/Sea Battle Emerging Concepts Requiring Additional Development

7 Slide 7 Platforms The U.S. Submarine Force consists of : –42 Los Angeles class attack submarines (SSN) – 3 Seawolf class attack submarines – 9 Virginia class attack submarines – 4 Ohio class Guided Missile Submarines (SSGN) –14 Ohio class Ballistic Missile Submarines (SSBN)

8 Slide 8 SSN Force Current Requirements (2005 Assessment) –10 SSNs providing Forward Presence (FP) –Able to surge 35 SSNs: includes war plan support –Need 48 SSNs to surge 35 and keep 10 for FP –Fewer ships - greater risk Current Allocation –SSNs assigned missions only they can perform –Mission categories: critical, high priority, priority, routine –CJCS allocation of 10 just meets critical missions Future Outlook –A2/AD –Prompt Strike

9 Slide 9 SSGN Force Homeport Maintenance Transit SOF Cert 15 Months Turnover/ Maintenance Transit Turnover/ Maintenance 10 ½ Months Theater Presence 70% Operational Availability 4 Ships each capable of carrying: 154 TLAM (105 typical loadout) 154 TLAM (105 typical loadout) 2 Dry Deck Shelters 2 Dry Deck Shelters 66 SOF for > 60 Days 66 SOF for > 60 Days 2-3 ships always in theater Bangor WA Kings Bay GA Guam Diego Garcia SSGN Mission: High Volume Precision Strike & High Volume SOF Support Able to Perform Many Other SSN Missions

10 Slide 10 SSBN Force 14 OHIO class SSBNs 100% of survivable warheads 54% of operational warheads –70% under NEW START 19% of strategic budget 3900 SSBN patrols since Ohio class SSBN Patrols 135 Consecutive Successes TRIDENT(D-5) on OHIO 2042 Survivable Leg of TRIAD Significant hedge capability

11 Slide 11 Virginia Class SSN Program Current Plan: 30 Ship Class –Block I: ships All delivered –Block II: ships 4 delivered, 2 under construction –Block III: ships 2 ships per year in 2011 Acquisition Program –$93B (TY) Procurement Program –APB assumes 30 hulls

12 Slide 12 Virginia Class Improvement Focus Cost Reduction Strategy Perform on the Backlog Design For Affordability Acquisition Strategy "… the cost of them has got to come down... it's got to be about $2 billion a ship. ADM Michael G. Mullen Sept ,500 5,000 7,500 10,000 12,500 15,000 Unit Cost Reduced by 4.9M Hours To Date Unit Cost Reduced by 4.9M Hours To Date >40% Labor Reduction >40% Labor Reduction # of Recurring Manhours xK SSN803 Unit 30 Unit 7Unit 1

13 Slide 13 Block III Bow Redesign SSGN MAC Benefits Parts Reduction – 50K reduced to 29K Pumps and Valves Further Reduced Hull Penetrations – 136 reduced to 64 Life of Ship Components added to the design Concept to Reality in 18 Months $800M Total Program Acquisition Savings First Bow Payload Tubes

14 Slide Nuclear Posture Review Retained the TRIAD and implies future retention SSBN most survivable leg of TRIAD No viable near- or mid-term threat to U.S. SSBNs Requires continuous at-sea presence in both oceans Keeps 14 SSBNs in the near-term Expect to maintain 20 operational tubes per SSBN by 2015

15 Slide 15 OHIO class Replacement Program Milestone A Achieved on 10 Jan 2011 Initiated Technology Development Phase Target Average ship cost (2-12) = 4.9B (FY10$) Target Average ship annual O&S = 110M (FY10$) Common Missile Compartment Electric Drive Propulsion 16 Missile Tubes Maximize commonality with VCS

16 Slide 16 Submarine Industrial Base Situation –Two private construction yards Electric Boat Newport News Shipbuilding Issues –Shrinking supplier base –75% (by $) sole-source suppliers –75% of suppliers are small businesses –Need 2500 designers to sustain a submarine design capability

17 Slide 17 Undersea Payload Capacity Flat Fish Study 1999 New Ship Options Are Unaffordable DARPA Future Sub Study 2003 New SSGN 20XX Towed Payload Module Multi-Mission Module Study 2002 Towed Payload Module Study 1998 Virginia Hull Plugs 688 SSGN VIRGINIA* * Assumes 30 Ship Virginia 2/year Starting % Reduction in Payload Capacity From Payload Capacity Will Decline, As The Value of Undersea Delivery Increases

18 Slide 18 Plan of Record Fiscal Constraints Shortfall of SSNs Uninterrupted Strategic Deterrence Sufficient Payload Volume OHIO Replacement SSBN New SSN V IV II III (10) (18) (27) (37) (12) (27) (34) SSNs SSGNs SSBNs

19 Slide 19 Submarine Force Campaign Design Force wholeness and integrity –Maintenance/modernization/training Ao Operations and warfighting today –Safe/secure/effective operations Operations and warfighting tomorrow –Force structure/payload volume/payloads

20 Slide 20 Integrated Undersea Strategy OHIO Replacement Performance and Schedule SSN Force Structure Shortfall Undersea Payload Volume after SSGN Retirement Keep OHIO Replacement top priority Add two lowest cost SSNs with best impact Add VIRGINIA payload module to 20 SSNs Evolutionary payload enhancements with high return IssuesActions Undersea Payload Capability Gaps

21 Slide 21 SSN Force Procurement Changes Add 2 Cost- Efficient Hulls Delay New SSN Start

22 Slide 22 Virginia Payload Module 40 Tomahawk / TACMS 8-12 Prompt strike weapons Battle management center Inboard SOF storage Targeting Block V ships

23 Slide 23 VPM Restores Payload Capacity VPM added to Blocks V, VI and VII restores most of the payload capacity and distributes it across more hulls Block V Block VI Block VII Total # of Launchers Fiscal Year SSGNs SSN Torpedo Tubes SSNs (12 Vertical Launch Tubes) SSNs (2 Large Bow Tubes) 1272 Launchers Stretch SSN Capacity (4 VPM)

24 Slide 24 Modular, Flexible Payload Plan 2 Large Bow Payload Tubes 12 Missile Stows Reconfigurable Torpedo Room 24 Torpedoes or; 21 Unmanned Systems or; Distributed Networked Systems or; Decoys Special Operations Force Berthing Virginia Payload Module (per tube) 3 Prompt Strike Weapons or; 7 Cruise Missiles or; 7 Torpedoes or; 14 Miniature Air Launched Decoys or: 1 Large UUV Advance Dry-Deck Shelter Swimmer Delivery Vehicles Combat Rubber Raiding Rafts Large Unmanned Undersea Vehicles

25 Slide 25 Summary Challenges are clear - plan is in place Submarine Force leadership is focused and unified VCS program is DoD role model ORP execution is key


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