Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

© Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry The Case for Culture Change Presented by.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "© Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry The Case for Culture Change Presented by."— Presentation transcript:

1 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry The Case for Culture Change Presented by The Valley District Safety Alliance

2 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry Goals l Importance of a positive safety culture. l Ethical and financial benefits of a positive safety culture. l Safety culture analysis. l Moving forward.

3 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry l "When anyone asks me how I can best describe my experience in nearly forty years at sea, I merely say, uneventful. Of course there have been winter gales, and storms and fog and the like. But in all my experience, I have never been in any accident... or any sort worth speaking about. I have seen but one vessel in distress in all my years at sea. I never saw a wreck and never have been wrecked nor was I ever in any predicament that threatened to end in disaster of any sort." (Quote by: Edward John Smith, 1907, Captain of the RMS Titanic)

4 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry Captain Edward James Smith ( ) Captain Smith was regarded as a safe captain with three incidents of note in his career:Captain Smith was regarded as a safe captain with three incidents of note in his career: The Germanic capsized under the weight of ice accumulation on her rigging and superstructure. He was in command.The Germanic capsized under the weight of ice accumulation on her rigging and superstructure. He was in command. September 1911, the Olympic* collided with the HMS Hawke. He was in command.September 1911, the Olympic* collided with the HMS Hawke. He was in command. In New York due to the great thrust of her propulsion system the Olympic* damaged a tugboat. He was in command.In New York due to the great thrust of her propulsion system the Olympic* damaged a tugboat. He was in command. *The Olympic was the sister ship of the R.M.S. Titanic.

5 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry Captain Smiths uneventful career came to an end April 15, 1912 with his death as well as the deaths of approximately 1500 crew and passengers.

6 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry What are some of the things that we can learn from Captain Smith? l Not having a serious incident does not necessarily mean that you are safe. l Being incident free can lead to a false sense of security. l Concentrating on productivity over safety can lead to an incident. l Failure to address safety observations can lead to an incident. l Improper planning can lead to an incident.

7 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry Reality of the safety culture

8 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry Safety Policy: Incidents are preventable! Norms: Safety is important, but Im behind schedule. Unwritten Rules: If I have to cut corners to get the job done on time thats ok. Assumptions: Its more important to get the job done quickly than to spend extra time on safety. History: Weve always done it this way.

9 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry Perception is reality l What are the perceptions of your safety culture? Uninformed Culture Accidents are unavoidable Evasion Culture Just trying to keep out of trouble Compliance Culture Clean record is most important Safety Culture Safety is a way of life

10 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry Perceptions Positivevs.Negative l Caring l Leadership l Trust l Ownership l Values l Commitment l Involvement l Responsiveness l Dignity l Education l Respect l l Lack of concern l l No accountability l l Mistrust l l Double Standards l l No management visibility l l Slow follow-up l l No involvement l l Not keeping commitments l l Numbers over people l l Blame-fixing l l Make deadlines not safety

11 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry What is a safety culture? l Safety permeates every aspect of daily life at work and at home as well. l How we plan, think, and act. Ironically the term Safety Culture first appeared on a report about the Chernobyl nuclear disaster.

12 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry Models Bottom Up Top Down Culture Change ModelBehavior-Based Model The organization influences the individual The individual influences the organization

13 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry Not convinced yet?

14 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry Think safety is too expensive? l I have to pay to train my people! l I have to pay someone to develop programs!! l I have to buy all these gloves and stuff!!! l I have to pay someone to just stand there while my folks work!!!! l But *#%& %$ we hardly ever even have accidents!!!!!

15 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry Accidents or Incidents? Merriam Webster Dictionary Accident: Main Entry: ac·ci·dent Pronunciation: 'ak-s&-d&nt, -"dent; 'aks-d&nt Function: noun 1 a : an unforeseen and unplanned event or circumstance b : lack of intention or necessity 2 a : an unfortunate event resulting especially from carelessness or ignorance b : an unexpected and medically important bodily event especially when injurious c : an unexpected happening causing loss or injury which is not due to any fault or misconduct on the part of the person injured but for which legal relief may be sought Those who say that accidents cannot be prevented are 100% correct! Thats because what we experience at work are not accidents! Something has to cause the incident, that item is the Root Cause. The root cause as well as the direct and indirect causes can be foreseen, expected and controlled. Carelessness can be observed and corrected, Ignorance is eliminated through proper education.

16 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry Costs of incidents l Ethical - The moral consequences. l Financial – The money aspects. l Legal – Legal accountability.

17 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry Ethical l A total of 4.4 million nonfatal injuries and illnesses were reported in private industry workplaces during 2003, resulting in a rate of 5.0 cases per 100 equivalent full-time workers, according to the Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), U.S. Department of Labor. l 5575 fatalities in 2003 according to the Fatal occupational injuries by industry and event or exposure, All United States, 2003 l How many families were effected? Mothers/Fathers Wives/Husbands Children/Grandchildren Etc.

18 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry Collateral Damage l Approximately half of Americans are married. That leaves approximately 2.2 million spouses directly affected by occupational injuries annually. With an average of 1.83 children we can estimate approximately 4 million children directly affected by occupational injuries annually. Add all this up and it get pretty frightening… »Workers + Spouses + Children = an estimated 10.6 million people affected annually by occupational injuries alone. »Those are stereotypical families, this does not factor in fiancé's, girlfriends, boyfriends, employers, etc. Based on statistical data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the US Census Bureau.

19 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry Financial l Costs associated with an accident Is it just medical fees & the injured employees salary? Obvious costs: Medical fees, property damage, salary, etc. Legal fees Productivity Loss Cost of Investigation No No Loss of business due to a negative reputation Insurance hikes Other Conservative Estimates say to multiply the obvious costs by a factor of 4 to get an estimate of the actual cost This effects the owners, employees, customers, etc!!!

20 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry Financial According to the Liberty Mutual Workplace Safety Index costs to employers nationwide average about $1 billion a week! The top 10 causes of workplace injures in 2001 were: INJURY CAUSECOST% TOTAL COST Overexertion$12.5B27.3% Falls on Same Level$5.7B12.6% Bodily Reaction$4.7B10.2% Falls To Lower Level$4.1B9.0% Struck by Object$3.9B8.6% Repetitive Motion$6.3B6.3% Highway Incident$2.3B5.1% Struck Against Object$1.9B4.1% Caught in, Compressed by$1.7B3.7% Assaults & Violent Acts$0.4B1.0%

21 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry Legal Criminal Prosecutions Civil Awards

22 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry May 2, 2005 With Little Fanfare, a New Effort to Prosecute Employers That Flout Safety Laws By DAVID BARSTOW and LOWELL BERGMAN For decades, the most egregious workplace safety violations have routinely escaped prosecution, even when they led directly to deaths or grievous injuries. Safety inspectors hardly ever called in the Justice Department. Congress repeatedly declined to toughen criminal laws for workplace deaths. Employers with extensive records of safety violations often paid insignificant fines and continued to ignore basic safety rules. Inside the Bush administration, though, a novel effort to end this pattern of leniency has begun to take root. With little fanfare and some adept bureaucratic maneuvering, a partnership between the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and a select group of Justice Department prosecutors has been forged to identify and single out for prosecution the nations most flagrant workplace safety violators. The initiative does not entail new legislation or regulation. Instead, it seeks to marshal a spectrum of existing laws that carry considerably stiffer penalties than those governing workplace safety alone. They include environmental laws, criminal statutes more commonly used in racketeering and white-collar crime cases and even some provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, a corporate reform law. The result, those involved say, should be to increase significantly the number of prosecutions brought against dangerous employers, particularly in cases involving death or injury. To read the full story visit:

23 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry Summary l Take steps to prevent incidents before they happen. l If something does happen, investigate immediately! Remember that investigations are not a witch hunt, out to find someone to blame so they can be fired, your employees must also understand this. l Dont look at how my safety department is spending money, instead look at how your safety folks are saving money by preventing incidents. l Use positive reinforcement with employees, supervisors, management, clients, and anyone else who acts in a safe manner. l Take time to properly train your workers. l Realize that good morale is directly linked to the safety of the workforce, good morale boosts productivity. l Educate the workers so that they understand the difference between accidents and incidents so that they may understand how to prevent them from occurring. l Management needs to care, the supervisors need to care and the employees need to care, not because they are forced to act like they care, but because they actually do. Find their hot buttons, pushing the right buttons can open their eyes and they can then understand why safety is personally vital to them. l Do all of the compliance stuff… but understand that it takes more than having a good written program to develop a positive safety culture.

24 © Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry Q & A


Download ppt "© Copyright 2005 Associated General Contractors Valley District Safety Alliance OHSA 10hr Construction Industry The Case for Culture Change Presented by."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google