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Design, construction and operation of Workshops for Petroleum road tanker maintenance Robert Harris.

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Presentation on theme: "Design, construction and operation of Workshops for Petroleum road tanker maintenance Robert Harris."— Presentation transcript:

1 Design, construction and operation of Workshops for Petroleum road tanker maintenance Robert Harris

2 The 2007 Code How we made the decision to update it How its different from the 1998 Code Whats in it How its useful to you

3 Why bother to update the Code? Current IP edition dates from 1998 Need perceived to continue publishing guidance: – Changes in UK petroleum industry to contracted distribution, sub contracted maintenance – Maintenance provider now removed from source of expertise and safety culture associated with oil industry

4 Opportunity to re-assess: The practice of working on tankers inside workshops, with the possibility of creating a flammable atmosphere within an unventilated space. The hazard from petrol vapour release having become several times greater than historically: – Capacity of tankers (42000 litres) – Their leakproofness – Higher pressure setting of PV valves

5 Opportunity to increase awareness: The hazards of maintaining tankers Perception that hazard awareness – not being passed down the chain to subcontractors and their employees – not being passed down from previous generation of technicians Proposal of a hierarchy of controls for working on tankers

6 Expertise rests within EI Risks from Petroleum products Sources of ignition Hazardous areas and certified electrical equipment

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9 Hazardous area calculation for tanker in a workshop using dispersion modelling: 8 000 litre compartment 60 mbar over pressure Stable atmosphere: Dip cap (if fitted) orifice release ~ 1 metre radius Fill cover release ~ 10 metre radius

10 EIs Petroleum Tanker Workshop Code is apparently only guidance available worldwide: no guidance listed by Australia (AIP) or US (American Petroleum Institute - API) EI is only guidance from any source for petroleum tanker workshops.

11 2007 edition relevance Changes in legislation since 2001 – particularly concerning – Explosive atmospheres, requiring drawings that define Hazardous Areas. – Working at height – Control of pollution

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13 ProductFlash pointAuto ignition temp Propane Butane Petrol Kerosene Gas oil All temperatures degrees Celsius * For LPGs, boiling point

14 ProductFlash pointAuto ignition temp Propane - 45 * Butane - 6 * Petrol- 40 Kerosene38 Gas oil55

15 ProductFlash pointAuto ignition temp Propane - 45 *468 Butane - 6 *450 Petrol- 40450 Kerosene38 Gas oil55

16 ProductFlash pointAuto ignition temp Propane - 45 *468 Butane - 6 *450 Petrol- 40450 Kerosene38250 Gas oil55260

17 Video clip here Andrew

18 From the report of the Ladbroke Grove train crash, 5th October 1999

19 4.36 It was agreed that the source of fuel for the fireball was finely dispersed diesel fuel. Much of it came from the contents of the fuel tank of the front car of the Turbo which contained 688 litres at the time of the crash.

20 4.37 The horrific effects of the fire were most pronounced in coach H. Witnesses described seeing, just after the coach had come to a stop, a fireball travelling from near the rear of coach H to about halfway into the carriage; this probably then rolled back again towards the rear. Mrs Pam Warren was sitting at the rear of coach H. She described what happened just after the carriage had come to a halt: http://www.rail-reg.gov.uk/upload/pdf/incident-ladbrokegrove-lgri1-optim.pdf

21 4.46 There were many potential sources of ignition. The most likely were the overhead line equipment, the onboard electrical systems and thermite sparking. Almost certainly all three were present and were particularly potent sources.

22 The 2007 Code How we made the decision to update it How its different from the 1998 Code Whats in it How its useful to you

23 1998: 23 pages 2007: 60 pages

24 The changes (additions): Location and security Hazardous area classification – DSEAR * Storage / disposal of drained products Facility maintenance management Fleet maintenance management Admission of tankers to workshops Hot work and cold work Permit to work

25 DSEAR * Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations 2002

26 The 2007 Code How we made the decision to update it How its different from the 1998 Code Whats in it How its useful to you

27 How the Code is laid out: Two parts – A and B (as before): Design and construction of the workshop Procedures and practices

28 Part A Location, layout and security. Workshop design, construction and maintenance Installed equipment

29 Location, layout and security: Site location (and access) Site layout Security Example of a layout

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31 Workshop design, construction and maintenance General statutory requirements Hazardous Area classification Overall design considerations Electrical Installation Access doors Inspection pits Heating and artificial ventilation

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33 Workshop design, construction and maintenance contd Site drainage Facilities for residual liquid Facilities for personnel Facility maintenance management regime

34 Workshop equipment Fire extinguishers and fire alarm system Facilities for working at height Compressed air Fume extraction Work benches Tanker venting Bulk storage tanks Hand held / portable equipment

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37 Part B Maintenance and repair operations Health, welfare and protection of personnel Fleet maintenance management Training and qualification of personnel Admission of tankers into workshops Workshop operations Gas freeing

38 Health, welfare, protection of personnel References to specific legislation Emergency response, First Aid and accident reporting Legionella Contact with petroleum products Clothing and PPE

39 Fleet maintenance management In house workshops Contracted maintenance Breakdowns and exceptional repairs

40 Training and qualification of personnel Records ADR requirements Working on tankers Safe use of equipment Road testing Emergency response

41 Admission of tankers into workshops Controls and procedures concerning flammable atmospheres and sources of ignition Emptying residual liquid Venting system for tankers in workshops Controls to minimise sources of ignition Controls on hot and cold work

42 Workshop operations General housekeeping and workshop inventory Permit to work system Parking and movement of tankers Working on tankers – general precautions Working under tankers Working on tanker product containment systems

43 Typical Permit-to-Work Number of staff present: Description of work Work tasks Method statements Risk assessments Location Tools Products contained Personal protective equipment Additional safety equipment Special conditions

44 Work areas to be kept clean and tidy, free from accumulations of flammable materials All tools to be maintained in good condition Any specialist contractors to be inducted in accordance with procedures for visitors, and workshop personnel are to accompany them at all times Any parts removed from tankers are to be stored in the designated area No hot work of any nature may be carried out without a separate Permit-to-Work P-t-W Special conditions

45 Workshop operations contd Electrical repairs to tankers Battery charging

46 Gas freeing procedure General Preparation Using an air eductor Using wet, low pressure steam Using water power wash Gas testing and gas free certification

47 Annexes Requirements in ADR for supervision of a laden tanker. Typical Permit to Work Typical gas-free certificate Glossary Audit checklist References

48 Audit checklist Useful tool for verification of design and equipment of new workshop....and an existing one.

49 Summary Need confirmed for updated Workshop CoP No other source of guidance for petroleum tanker workshops Petrol and diesel are dangerous products to handle, particularly in an enclosed space Hazardous areas need to be identified and recognised

50 All Sources of ignition should be recognised and controlled Workshop operations and procedures need to recognise the risk of possible presence of flammable vapours OR mists Procedures should be in place for containment of product in planned and unplanned releases (including disposal)

51 Know your drains Working at height is here to stay – so are the controls Occasionally stand back

52 The 2007 Code How we made the decision to update it How its different from the 1998 Code Whats in it How its useful to you

53 Particular thanks to: Paul Whitehead FTA Cliff Yarney Scania Dave Rowlands Wincanton John Hazeldean HSE Mark ScanlonEnergy Institute Martin HunnybunEnergy Institute

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