Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

The Schepens Eye Research Institute An Affiliate of Harvard Medical School The Effect of Edge Filtering on Vision Multiplexing Henry L. Apfelbaum, Doris.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "The Schepens Eye Research Institute An Affiliate of Harvard Medical School The Effect of Edge Filtering on Vision Multiplexing Henry L. Apfelbaum, Doris."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Schepens Eye Research Institute An Affiliate of Harvard Medical School The Effect of Edge Filtering on Vision Multiplexing Henry L. Apfelbaum, Doris H. Apfelbaum, Russell L. Woods, Eli Peli SID 2005 May 23, Boston, MA AA

2 Motivation Our lab is developing devices to help people with low vision

3 Motivation Our lab is developing devices to help people with low vision –Central field loss (e.g., macular degeneration)

4 Motivation Our lab is developing devices to help people with low vision –Central field loss (e.g., macular degeneration) –Peripheral vision loss (tunnel vision)

5 Tunnel vision

6 Motivation Our lab is developing devices to help people with low vision –Central field loss (e.g., macular degeneration) –Peripheral vision loss (tunnel vision) Our devices employ vision multiplexing

7 Motivation Our lab is developing devices to help people with low vision –Central field loss (e.g., macular degeneration) –Peripheral vision loss (tunnel vision) Our devices employ vision multiplexing –Two different views presented to one or both eyes simultaneously

8 Vision multiplexing: HUD

9 Motivation Our lab is developing devices to help people with low vision –Central field loss (e.g., macular degeneration) –Peripheral vision loss (tunnel vision) Our devices employ vision multiplexing –Two different views presented to one or both eyes simultaneously –For tunnel vision, we have spectacles with a see- through minifying display

10 See-through minifying HMD a a

11 Camera a a

12 See-through minifying HMD Camera Display a a

13 See-through minifying HMD Beam-splitter Camera Display a a

14 Motivation Our lab is developing devices to help people with low vision –Central field loss (e.g., macular degeneration) –Peripheral vision loss (tunnel vision) Our devices employ vision multiplexing –Two different views presented to one or both eyes simultaneously –For tunnel vision, we have spectacles with a see- through minifying display –We edge-filter the display to emphasize detail needed for orientation and navigation

15 See-through HMD

16 Motivation Can the brain handle it?

17 Neisser & Becklen experiment (1975)

18 Count the slap attempts

19 Did you see her?

20 Motivation Can the brain handle it?

21 Motivation Can the brain handle it? Inattentional blindness

22 Motivation Can the brain handle it? Inattentional blindness: –Failure to notice significant events in one scene while attention is focused on another scene

23 Motivation Can the brain handle it? Inattentional blindness: –Failure to notice significant events in one scene while attention is focused on another scene Hypothesis: Edge filtering can mitigate inattentional blindness

24 Our experiment We reproduced the Neisser and Becklen experiment, introducing edge filtering to see if unexpected events would be noticed more readily

25 Our experiment We reproduced the Neisser and Becklen experiment, introducing edge filtering to see if unexpected events would be noticed more readily 4 attended/unattended scene filtering combinations:

26 Full video over full video

27 Filtered ballgame over full handgame: Bipolar edges

28 Filtered ballgame over full handgame: White edges

29 DigiVision edge filter output

30 Filtered handgame over full ballgame

31 Both games edge-filtered

32 Our experiment We reproduced the Neisser and Becklen experiment, introducing edge filtering to see if unexpected events would be noticed more readily 4 attended/unattended scene filtering combinations

33 Our experiment We reproduced the Neisser and Becklen experiment, introducing edge filtering to see if unexpected events would be noticed more readily 4 attended/unattended scene filtering combinations 6 unexpected event scenes:

34 Unexpected events JugglerLost ball Umbrella woman Choose-up Handshake Ball toss

35 Trials 36 subjects 4 practice trials 8 scored trials –Each game attended in half of the trials –6 showed the 6 unexpected events –2 had no unexpected event –All 4 filtering treatments used with each game –Edge/edge combination used for the trials without unexpected events –Treatment/unexpected event pairings and presentation order were balanced across subjects

36 Trials (contd) Subject clicked a mouse at each ball toss or hand-slap attempt in the attended game

37 Trials (contd) Subject clicked a mouse at each ball toss or hand-slap attempt in the attended game Questions asked after each trial:

38 Trials (contd) Subject clicked a mouse at each ball toss or hand-slap attempt in the attended game Questions asked after each trial: –How difficult was that? –Any particularly hard parts?

39 Trials (contd) Subject clicked a mouse at each ball toss or hand-slap attempt in the attended game Questions asked after each trial: –How difficult was that? –Any particularly hard parts? –Anything in the background that distracted you or interfered with the task?

40 Trials (contd) Subject clicked a mouse at each ball toss or hand-slap attempt in the attended game Questions asked after each trial: –How difficult was that? –Any particularly hard parts? –Anything in the background that distracted you or interfered with the task? We scored –Number of unexpected events detected

41 Trials (contd) Subject clicked a mouse at each ball toss or hand-slap attempt in the attended game Questions asked after each trial: –How difficult was that? –Any particularly hard parts? –Anything in the background that distracted you or interfered with the task? We scored –Number of unexpected events detected –Hits rate (mouse click close to attended event) –Average response time to attended event hits

42 Results: Unexpected event detections 57% of the 216 unexpected events presented were detected

43 Results: Unexpected event detections 57% of the 216 unexpected events presented were detected Only 2 subjects detected all 6 events shown One subject detected none

44 Results: Unexpected event detections Attended Full Edge Total Unattended FullEdgeFull Ball toss Choose-up Juggler Umbrella88319 Handshake43411 Lost ball3227 Total Edge filtering was not significant (p = 0.67)

45 Results: Attended task accuracy Hit rates were high –95.2% ballgame hit accuracy –98.2% handgame hit accuracy

46 Results: Attended task accuracy Hit rates were high –95.2% ballgame hit accuracy –98.2% handgame hit accuracy –No significant effect of cartooning or unexpected events

47 Results: Attended task accuracy Hit rates were high –95.2% ballgame hit accuracy –98.2% handgame hit accuracy –No significant effect of cartooning or unexpected events Hit response times

48 Results: Attended task accuracy Hit rates were high –95.2% ballgame hit accuracy –98.2% handgame hit accuracy –No significant effect of cartooning or unexpected events Hit response times –Event scene had no significant effect (p > 0.65)

49 Results: Attended task accuracy Hit rates were high –95.2% ballgame hit accuracy –98.2% handgame hit accuracy –No significant effect of cartooning or unexpected events Hit response times –Event scene had no significant effect (p > 0.65) –Filtering the unattended task had no significant effect (p = 0.37)

50 Results: Attended task accuracy Hit rates were high –95.2% ballgame hit accuracy –98.2% handgame hit accuracy –No significant effect of cartooning or unexpected events Hit response times –Event scene had no significant effect (p > 0.65) –Filtering the unattended task had no significant effect (p = 0.37) –Filtering the attended task had a significant but small impact (527 vs 498 ms, p < 0.001)

51 Conclusions Good news: Edge filtering did not materially affect performance of the attended task

52 Conclusions Good news: Edge filtering did not materially affect performance of the attended task –We know that the relative ease with which salient features can be found in an edge- filtered view aids orientation and navigation

53 Conclusions Good news: Edge filtering did not materially affect performance of the attended task –We know that the relative ease with which salient features can be found in an edge- filtered view aids orientation and navigation – Edge filtering also seems to make it easier to distinguish the views

54 Conclusions Good news: Edge filtering did not materially affect performance of the attended task –We know that the relative ease with which salient features can be found in an edge- filtered view aids orientation and navigation – Edge filtering also seems to make it easier to distinguish the views Surprising news: Edge filtering did not aid (or hinder) the detection of unexpected events

55 Future We plan to test subjects with tunnel vision (who need to scan to view the full scene)

56 Future We plan to test subjects with tunnel vision (who need to scan to view the full scene) Some events are much more detectable than others, so we hope to learn more about just what affects detectability

57 Future We plan to test subjects with tunnel vision (who need to scan to view the full scene) Some events are much more detectable than others, so we hope to learn more about just what affects detectability The context provided when one scene is viewed at two scales (as in our HMD, rather than two different scenes) may affect detectability

58 Future We plan to test subjects with tunnel vision (who need to scan to view the full scene) Some events are much more detectable than others, so we hope to learn more about just what affects detectability The context provided when one scene is viewed at two scales (as in our HMD, rather than two different scenes) may affect detectability Bipolar edges are obviously better than white- only edges. A totally-video HMD could afford that advantage

59 Acknowledgements Ulrich Neisser Miguel A. Garcia-Pérez Elisabeth M. Fine The Levinthal-Sidman JCC The JCC athletic staff James Barabas Ben Peli Aaron Mandel Chas Simmons Supported in part by NIH grant EY and DOD grant W81XWH

60 THANK YOU!

61 QUESTIONS?

62 Results: Attended task hit rates HitsMisses False Alarms Ballgame95.2%4.8%5.2% Handgame98.2%1.8%3.0%

63 Results: Attended task response times Unattended scene (not significant, p = 0.37) FullEdges Attended scene (significant, p < 0.001) Edges 532 ms (±84) 522 ms (±96) Full 500 ms (±97) 496 ms (±100)


Download ppt "The Schepens Eye Research Institute An Affiliate of Harvard Medical School The Effect of Edge Filtering on Vision Multiplexing Henry L. Apfelbaum, Doris."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google