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RTU Conference 22 nd November 2013 ‘Optimising achievement through a whole school approach to Emotional Health and Wellbeing’ SHAUNA CATHCART.

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Presentation on theme: "RTU Conference 22 nd November 2013 ‘Optimising achievement through a whole school approach to Emotional Health and Wellbeing’ SHAUNA CATHCART."— Presentation transcript:

1 RTU Conference 22 nd November 2013 ‘Optimising achievement through a whole school approach to Emotional Health and Wellbeing’ SHAUNA CATHCART

2 An Introduction to the Framework Materials & RTU/PHA Pilot An introduction to the framework materials: ‘Optimising learning through a whole-school approach to EHWB and SEL’

3 MAKING THE LINKS! Student Achievement & Emotional Health and Wellbeing Student achievement is our core business in schools. Student achievement is a reflection of academic success and personal wellbeing. Pupil academic success and personal wellbeing are synergistic and integrated There is also a dynamic symbiosis between teacher and student wellbeing. Fostering wellbeing for teachers helps them to support students

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5 ‘Being mentally and emotionally healthy means that we believe in ourselves and know our own worth. We set ourselves goals that we can achieve and can find support to do this. We are aware of our emotions and what we are feeling and can understand why. We can cope with our changing emotions and we can speak about and manage our feelings. We understand what others may be feeling and know how to deal with their feelings. We also understand when to let go and not overreact. We know how to make friendships and relationships and how to cope with changes in them. We understand that everyone can be anxious, worried or sad sometimes. We know how to cope with, and bounce back from, changes or problems and can talk about them to someone we trust’ DE PEHAW WORKING GROUP

6 ‘Their ability to empathise, persevere, control impulses, communicate clearly, make thoughtful decisions, solve problems, and work with others earns them friends and success. They tend to lead happier lives, with more satisfying relationships. At work, they are more productive, and they spur productivity in others. At school, they do better on standardized tests and help create a safe, comfortable atmosphere that makes it easier to learn ’ (Edutopia Staff Acessed 5 th September 2010) Children with good EHWB stand out:

7 What’s EHWB got to do with education? 7

8 Why do we need to teach these skills? 3 driving forces that won’t go away… 1.Employers’ needs 2.Links between learning, attainment and social and emotional skills 3.Demands on young people in a changing society Employers are looking for more than just technical skills and knowledge of a degree discipline. They particularly value skills such as communication, team working and problem solving. Job applicants who can demonstrate that they have developed these skills will have a real advantage. Digby Jones, Director-General, Confederation of British Industry 8

9 1. Employers’ needs 9 CBI LEARNING TO GROW EDUCATION AND SKILLS SURVEY 2012 (in partnership with PEARSON)

10 How do EHWB and SEL link to other Educational agendas? 10 WE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE

11 Improves Academic Outcomes 23% increase in skills 9% improvement in attitudes about self, others and school 9% improvement in pro-social behaviour 9% reduction in problem behaviours 10% reduction in emotional distress 11% increase in standardised achievement test scores (maths and reading) Source: Durlak, J.A., Weissberg, R.P., Taylor, R.D. & Dy mnicki, A.B. (submitted for publication). The effects of school based social and emotional learning: A meta-analytic review.

12 Why does EHWB impact on attainment? A positive, safe environment with nurturing affirming relationships is proven to promotes student motivation, engagement with learning and achievement More teaching and learning time is available as behaviours that interfere with learning are decreased. (e.g. less peer disagreements/ reduced incidences of poorly managed anger) SEL skills are ‘gateway’ skills for learning: –Promotes deeper understanding of subject matter (e.g. perspective-taking & problem solving) –Helps students learn well with others –Promotes Increased responsibility –Develops improved persistence & resilience –Helps students effectively manage feelings associated with learning – Decrease behaviours that interfere with learning. Pupils are better able to manage the social and emotional aspects of cognitive tasks 12

13 Demands on young people in a changing society In a school of 1000 pupils there are likely to be: 50 with depression 10 affected by eating disorders 100 experiencing ‘significant distress’ with obsessive compulsive disorder 5-10 attempting suicide 13 N. I CONTEXT 10-20% pupils experiencing EHWB Difficulties 7-18% 10/11yr olds reported feeling lonely, sad, not enjoying life 21% 12-13yr olds reported being bullied 2/3 times per month (Green et al, 2005) (Centre For Effective Education,Queen’s University, Belfast, 2011)

14 Society has changed… Issues facing our young people : -Drug culture -Body image (media ‘role-models’) -Choices around sexual behaviour -Obesity issues -Social media and other technologies -Other? 14

15 What do we need to do to become a school that actively promotes EHWB? 15 What works? Evidence based success factors: Support from Principal Critical mass of staff understanding/supporting rationale for undertaking the work Clear, negotiated vision for what trying to achieve Careful strategic planning to build on what is already going on in the school and ’make it your own’ Whole school approach Staff development and EHWB

16 The iceberg model Explicit Programme for pupil skills and curriculum reinforcement Teacher skills (and ability to act as role models) ETHOS

17 Successful CHANGE: The four ingredients Vision+Skills+Incentives+Resources=Change +Skills+Incentives+Resources=Confusion Vision++incentives+Resources=Anxiety Vision+Skills++Resources=Resistance Vision+Skills+incentives+=Frustration 17 Adapted by Richard Vila, Bayridge Consortium Inc. from for Knoster, T. (1991)

18 Maslow’s Hierarchy of needs

19 The Change Curve Shock Resistance Loss of Control Low Morale Exploration Discovery Adjustment T i m e Emotional Response based on work by Kubler-Ross Worried

20 An Introduction to the Framework Materials An introduction to the framework materials: ‘Optimising learning through a whole-school approach to EHWB and SEL’

21 What promotes EHWB in schools? A whole-school approach to helping children achieve EHWB, including the ability to develop the social, emotional and behavioural skills that underpin effective learning positive behaviour good relationships employability success in its broadest sense. 21 A four-part model for promoting EHWB in schools A structured & progressive explicit curriculum to teach the skills of social and emotional learning (SEL) Reinforcing the SEL skills across the curriculum A Positive Ethos – Relationships, Language & Environment Staff EHWB and Role-modelling

22 Element 1: A positive ethos Key characteristics of a Positive Ethos -Relationships -Language -Environment  Physical  Social  Emotional 22 A structured & progressive explicit curriculum to teach the skills of social and emotional learning (SEL) Reinforcing the SEL skills across the curriculum Staff EHWB and Role-modelling

23 Element 2: Staff modelling ‘ 23 The way (children) are treated and the examples they are set by their peers and by adults (are) almost certainly the strongest influences on how they will treat others, their environment, and develop respect for themselves. Sir Jim Rose, CBE A structured & progressive explicit curriculum to teach the skills of social and emotional learning (SEL) Reinforcing the SEL skills across the curriculum A Positive Ethos – Relationships, Language & Environment Staff EHWB and Role-modelling

24 Staff cannot be role models unless their own EHWB is attended to and their own social and emotional skills developed 24

25 ELEMENT 3: An explicit curriculum to teach the skills of social and emotional learning (SEL) The evidence demonstrates that the skills of SEL will not be simply ‘caught’. They need to be explicitly taught through a structured and progressive curriculum What are the key areas of social and emotional learning? One model: –Self awareness and self-valuing –Managing our feelings –Motivation –Empathy –Social skills (within each area, there are a number of sub-skills) 25 A structured & progressive explicit curriculum to teach the skills of social and emotional learning (SEL) Reinforcing the SEL skills across the curriculum A Positive Ethos – Relationships, Language & Environment Staff EHWB and Role-modelling

26 Element 4: Reinforcement Isn’t it enough to just teach the skills? If you are wearing a watch, take it off and place it on the other wrist….. 26 A structured & progressive explicit curriculum to teach the skills of social and emotional learning (SEL) Reinforcing the SEL skills across the curriculum A Positive Ethos – Relationships, Language & Environment Staff EHWB and Role-modelling

27 The neuroscience of Behaviour change 27

28 An Introduction to the Framework Materials An introduction to the framework materials: ‘Optimising learning through a whole-school approach to EHWB and SEL’

29 29 What will we be doing? An introduction to The Framework and materials It can be helpful to think of change as happening in phases Pre-commitment/ awareness (Phase 1) Innovation (Phase 2) Implementation (Phase 3) Institutionalisation (Phase 4)

30 The Framework: Phase 1 It will generally take 3-5 years for a change to become institutionalised (part of ‘the way we do things around here’) Fullan, 2007 © RTU and Barnardos 30

31 The Framework: Phase 2 31

32 The Framework: Phase 3 32

33 The Framework: Phase 4 33

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35 What promotes EHWB in schools? 35 A four-part model for promoting EHWB in schools A whole-school approach to helping children achieve EHWB and develop SEL includes four elements. The focus today is: A structured & progressive explicit curriculum to teach the skills of social and emotional learning (SEL) Reinforcing the SEL skills across the curriculum Staff EHWB and Role-modelling

36 The importance of ethos They will forget what you said They will forget what you did But they will never forget the way that you made them feel (Maya Angelou)

37 Ethos and learning it is difficult to: Pay careful attention Focus and concentrate Generate creative ideas Work well in a group Be motivated Overcome difficulties Take a risk Keep going, despite frustration Bounce back after a setback Remember learning If we are feeling Cross Frustrated Scared Anxious Stressed Embarrassed Pre-occupied or if we do not feel emotionally safe…

38 Of all the keys to effective learning that research throws up, it is the ‘state’ that we are in when we learn which comes through time and time again as the single most important factor in the learning process. Working memory is disrupted by ‘neural static’. It has a finite capacity and if concerned with processing strong emotions, it cannot be freed up to deal with other cognitive information. Ideal states for learning …

39 Extreme stress inhibits learning as stress chemical paralyses areas of learning and cortical processing slows down. Mild to moderate amounts stimulate more brain activity and production of more connections in area of learning.

40 DVD Teacher losing It

41 What do we see in a learning environment with a positive ethos? Students (or adults): Being willing to take a risk and showing that they are not fearful of getting things wrong Talking openly and honestly Not being afraid to disagree with the prevailing consensus Being able to ask for help Being able to share their own personal experiences, vulnerabilities and strengths Being able to compliment and support others within the class Asking their own questions Taking responsibility (and credit) for their learning

42 Building a Positive Ethos Levels of Functioning From least to most desirable, the levels of functioning are: Level One: Intentionally Disinviting Level Two: Unintentionally Disinviting Level Three: Unintentionally Inviting Level Four: Intentionally Inviting It is the typical level of functioning that indicates the person’s and organization’s atmosphere (Fundamentals of Invitational Education Purkey & Novak 2008) How invitational is your school?– The Ladder

43 Four Types of Inviting Stances Intentionally Disinviting A negative and toxic attitude designed to demean, defeat, dishearten Intentionally Inviting Seeking consistently to enact the principles of Invitational Education (helping with care and respect) Unintentionally Disinviting Accidental discouragement and undermining of others Unintentionally Inviting Accidental encouragement and support 43

44 The Key Elements of building a positive school ethos A Positive Ethos Relationships Language Environment

45 The importance of relationships (feelings of belonging, connection and being valued) The quality of teacher- student relationship has been shown to be one of the most significant factors influencing student-learning outcomes (Cornelius-White(2007;Hatie 2009;Rowe 2001)

46 ETHOS Element 1: Relationships What is the impact of ethos? -Relationships © RTU and Barnardos 46 It is a basic human need to feel cared for, to feel that we belong and that we are valued…

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48 The importance of relationships High-quality relationships are characterised by: INVOLVEMENT EMOTIONAL SAFETY WARMTH CLOSENESS TRUST RESPECT CARE SUPPORT Sue Roffey (2013) ’Positive Relationships’

49 ETHOS Element 2: Language What is the impact of ethos? -Language © RTU and Barnardos 49 Three tools to ensure the language we use contributes to a positive ethos

50 A key feature of Ethos: The language we use What is wrong with the language the teacher is using? What might the impact of the teacher’s words be on the pupil? John Smyth you are just so unbelievably rude. Don’t you dare do that again in my class

51 THREE things we can do differently John Smyth you are just so unbelievably rude. Don’t you dare do that again in my class 1.Relate correction or criticism to the behaviour, not the person 2.Use I-messages (‘magic messages’) 3.Use positive phrasing instead of negative

52 I-messages You are always late – it is so annoying It’s a waste of time coming if you never do your homework You are deliberately making it impossible for me to teach Why can’t you ever remember your kit? Don’t accuse! Use magic messages

53 Positive phrasing Don’t speak to me like that! Why are you dropping litter? You’ve left your equipment out again! How dare you argue with me! Stop pushing into the queue You shouldn’t be in here You are really annoying me by interrupting What do you think you’re doing? Please put that away and get started on the activity, thank- you. Wait your turn in the queue, thanks Sam, litter in the bin, thanks Please speak to me politely, as I do to you, thank you Put your equipment away, thank you Where should you be right now? I understand you’re upset, but I need you to listen to me, thanks Please wait your turn to speak

54 Element 3: Environment What is the impact of ethos? -Environment © RTU and Barnardos 54  Physical  Social  Emotional

55 There is no such thing as a neutral ‘ Everybody and everything around the school adds or subtracts from, the process of being a beneficial presence in the lives of human beings, personally and professionally’ (Fundamentals of Invitational Education Purkey & Novak 2008) Element 3: Environment

56 The Physical Environment Welcoming notices Displays celebrating individuals, encouraging a sense of belonging Safe places in playground Buddy stops Making-up corners Playground games and equipment

57 The Social Environment Quality of relationships Explicit activities to help pupils to get to know and trust each other (E.g. clubs, SEL activities) Celebration of pro-social behaviours and attitudes Whole-school events (assemblies) and fostering of school as a community

58 The Emotional Environment The three key areas: Need to be safe Need to belong Need to feel valued

59 The Emotional Environment

60 High Low When our emotional involvement is low our rational perspective is high. Conversely, when the emotional involvement is high our rational perspective is low Paul Mc Gee (2011 )

61 A positively affirming classroom environment A class charter with agreed rules based on an understanding of rights and responsibilities. Consistent use and reinforcement of rules Understanding of sanctions and rewards and behaviours that earn them Effective anti-bullying measures Clear routines and rituals! The Emotional Environment : The need to feel safe

62 The need to belong… Actively building in opportunities to get to know and work with everyone in the group Actively building trust and group cohesiveness

63 Some ideas for activities to promote a sense of belonging Class charters Circle Games Paper-Chains with each person’s name on Birthday celebrations Welcome packs Secret friends Name Games Quizzes Group challenges Home group flags jigsaw pictures Calming down posters Welcome PPT Presentations Songs – ‘Consider Yourself’

64 The need to feel valued … Relationships - Finding out about students and celebrating their strengths and talents Pupil voice and input (I can make a difference) Establishing a ‘put-up’ not a ‘put-down’ ethos (praise!) Positive language

65 IN SUMMARY What promotes EHWB in schools? A whole-school approach to helping children achieve EHWB, underpins effective learning positive behaviour good relationships employability success in its broadest sense. 65 A four-part model for promoting EHWB in schools A structured & progressive explicit curriculum to teach the skills of social and emotional learning (SEL) Reinforcing the SEL skills across the curriculum A Positive Ethos – Relationships, Language & Environment Staff EHWB and Role-modelling

66 The iceberg model Explicit Programme for pupil skills and curriculum reinforcement Teacher skills (and ability to act as role models) ETHOS

67 EHWB REALLY MATTERS Optimising Learning through a whole-school Emotional Health and Wellbeing (EHWB):

68 Thank-you They will forget what you said They will forget what you did But they will never forget the way that you made them feel


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