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COLD WAR MUSEUM Click here to come inside Where do you want to go? Post-War Reconstruction Cold War Involvement Cold War Crises Click here to go to our.

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Presentation on theme: "COLD WAR MUSEUM Click here to come inside Where do you want to go? Post-War Reconstruction Cold War Involvement Cold War Crises Click here to go to our."— Presentation transcript:

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2 COLD WAR MUSEUM Click here to come inside

3 Where do you want to go? Post-War Reconstruction Cold War Involvement Cold War Crises Click here to go to our interactive hall Exit the Museum

4 Post War Reconstruction To view the NATO/ Warsaw Pact exhibits click the picture above To view the Truman Doctrine exhibit click the picture above Go to Cold War Involvement Go to Cold War Crises To view the Marshall Plan exhibit click the picture above Go to the Main Room Click here to go to our interactive hall Exit the Museum

5 Cold War Involvement Click the picture below to go to US involvement in the Cold War exhibit Click the picture below learn about the first conflict that the US was involved in during the Cold War Click either of the flags above to go to the background information exhibits VS Go to Post-War Reconstruction Go to Cold War Crises Go to the Main Room Click here to go to our interactive hall Exit the Museum

6 Cold War Crises Click the picture below to go to the Berlin Wall/Blockade exhibits Click the picture below to go to the Berlin Airlift exhibit Click the picture below to go to the Cuban Missile Crisis exhibit Go to Post-War Reconstruction Go to Cold War Involvement Go to the Main Room Click here to go to our interactive hall Exit the Museum

7 NATO exhibit Click the picture above to view the NATO exhibit Click the picture above to view the Warsaw Pact exhibit Go Back to Post-War Reconstruction Warsaw Pact exhibit

8 President Truman, along with 11 other diplomats from different countries, signed the NATO treaty on April 4, 1949 Go Back The NATO Treaty

9 On May 14, 1955, 8 countries signed the Warsaw Pact, a treaty between the Soviet Union and its Eastern European allies Go Back The Warsaw Pact

10 Truman asked Congress to provide aid to Greece and Turkey because Great Britain would stop helping those countries on May 30, Truman was afraid that they would fall to communism. He then stated that it was the duty of the US to help democratic countries from falling to communism and/or totalitarianism. Go back to Post-War Reconstruction The Truman Doctrine To listen to Trumans speech click below The_Truman_Doctrine.asf

11 The Marshall Plan was a financial recovery plan instituted more than 2 years after VE day. Truman signed the bill establishing the ECA. It didnt only provide economic relief, but prevented the spread of communism. Go back to Post-War Reconstruction The Marshall Plan

12 Click above to go to the What was the Cold War exhibit Click above to go to the How did the Cold War begin exhibit Go back to Cold War Involvement

13 The Cold war was the growing distrust between the U.S. and Russia after WWII. Neither fought the other, but the U.S. supported anticommunist European and Asian countries, while Russia supported and controlled its allies. When their allied countries fought against each other, they fought each other indirectly. Go back What was the Cold War?

14 VS America was afraid of a Russian attack. Russia was afraid of an American attack. Russia disagreed with American capitalism. America disagreed with Soviet communism. Russia wanted the whole world communist. America refused to give nuclear secrets to Russia. Russia moved their border westward. Russia took action in the Soviet zone of Germany. Go back How did the Cold War Begin?

15 The U.S. became involved as a representative of the U.N., and started fighting in the summer of They got involved to contain North Koreas fast moving army. They wanted to defeat it, and at the same time respond to the military challenges from the communist world. There was ceasefire declared on July 27, 1953 with the end of negotiations. However, no official peace agreement has been signed Go Back to Cold War Involvement US Involvement in the Cold War

16 The Korean War lasted from It began in June 1950, when North Koreans, backed by Russia, made a surprise attack on South Korea backed by the U.S. What happened in Korea almost made the Cold War into a Hot War. Communist China also was backing North Korea in their fight. Go back to Cold War Involvement The Korean War

17 Berlin Wall/Blockade Click the picture above to go to the Berlin Blockade exhibit Click the picture above to go to the Berlin Wall exhibit Go back to Cold War Crises

18 Berlin Blockade First convoy through the Berlin Blockade after it was torn down (above) Civilians celebrating the lifting of the Berlin Blockade (above) After the defeat of Germany in 1945 Berlin was split in four sectors between America, Brittan, France and the USSR. In 1948 Stalin decided he was done splitting the capital city and aimed to drive the western powers out. He blocked all train, ship, and car routes into Berlin in 1948 for a full year until Truman set up the Berlin Airlifts. Go back

19 Berlin Wall 1955 Russian Premier Nikita Khrushchev came to power, wanting to show strength and power. He didnt want Germany to reunite, so he started building the Berlin wall. He started construction in 1961.On August 13 th, 1963, barbed wire barricades came up cutting the city in half, concrete walls soon followed. Building of the Berlin wall (above) Rioters protest the Berlin Wall (below) Go back

20 Berlin Airlift After Stalin blocked of all the supply routes via boats, cars, and trains, President Truman sent supplies (food, clothing, etc.) to Berlin by air. After about one year of the airlifts, Stalin ended the blockades. Planes ready to take off for an airlift (above) Airlift bases through Europe (left) Go back to Cold War Crises Supplies dropped during Airlifts (below)

21 Fidel Castro (below) overthrew Dictator of Cuba Fulgenicio Batista. John F. Kennedy (left) supported Cubans against Castro, and attempted to over throw him (a failure). Russian Premier Nikita Khrushchev (right) supported Castro and sent to him short range and intermediate range nuclear missiles Missile base in Cuba (left) Range of missiles (below) Go back to Cold War Crises To listen to Kennedys speech click below JFK_Addresses_the_Cuban_Missile_Crisis.asf

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26 Go to the Main Room Retake the quiz

27 Come in!

28 Thank you for attending our Museum. The people that worked on this project were: & Cyril Putzer Russell Oppenheim Justin Haber We hope you enjoyed the exhibits here at the Cold War Museum. Please come again soon.

29 Dont forget to get your hand stamped for reentry!

30 COLD WAR MUSEUM Click here to reenter.


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