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LOCCSD Parent Meetings, November 2012 LOCCSD REPORTING STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT 2012-13.

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Presentation on theme: "LOCCSD Parent Meetings, November 2012 LOCCSD REPORTING STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT 2012-13."— Presentation transcript:

1 LOCCSD Parent Meetings, November 2012 LOCCSD REPORTING STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT 2012-13

2 AGENDA Opening Prayer and Introductions Assessment Presentation Questions

3 WELCOME AND OPENING PRAYER

4 What do we want for our children? Reading, Writing and Numeracy Skills Resilience Ability to solve complex and simple problems Ability to think deeply on their own Knowledge of where to go for information and what strategies work best for figuring things out Ability to be creative and think critically Ability to accept responsibility Desire to impact their family and the world positively

5 Traditionally, what and how have our schools been teaching students? Our schools have not changed much in the past 100 years Students are processed in batches All are processed at same rate Pre-set curriculum delivered to all in bite sized pieces in a pre-set order TRADITIONAL/INDUSTRIAL MODEL Skills: Punctuality Punctuality Following instructions Following instructions Recognizing the authority of the Recognizing the authority of the supervisor supervisor Working on monotonous tasks for a Working on monotonous tasks for a long period of time long period of time

6 AN EXAMINATION OF SASKATCHEWANS PISA AND PCAP SCORES

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9 UNDERSTANDING 21ST CENTURY WORLD New Competencies: most work today and in the future requires competencies (skills, knowledge & dispositions) we cannot imagine. Learning how to learnLearning how to learn Critical, creative and innovative thinking and problem solvingCritical, creative and innovative thinking and problem solving Collaborative teamwork and leadershipCollaborative teamwork and leadership New Competencies: most work today and in the future requires competencies (skills, knowledge & dispositions) we cannot imagine. Learning how to learnLearning how to learn Critical, creative and innovative thinking and problem solvingCritical, creative and innovative thinking and problem solving Collaborative teamwork and leadershipCollaborative teamwork and leadership

10 Welcome to 21 st Century Learning: The alignment of curriculum, assessment and instruction guided by relevance, relationships and rigor for our students.

11 Grade 9 Science – 15 outcomes Analyze the relationships that exist among voltage, current, and resistance in series and parallel circuits. Grade 9 Science – 91 objectives Identify parallel branches and series branches within a circuit. OLD VS. NEW CURRICULA Previous documentsNew documents

12 SASKATCHEWAN CURRICULUM ON-LINE Saskatchewan Online Curriculum

13 BLOOMS TAXONOMY 1. Remember 2. Understand 3. Apply 4. Analyze 5. Evaluate 6. Create The curriculum asks students to think at higher levels; to develop deep understanding.

14 SASKATCHEWAN CURRICULUM DESIGNED FOR HIGHER ORDER THINKING SKILLS Grade: 9 Unit: Physical Science: Characteristics of Electricity Outcome: CE 9.1 Demonstrate and analyze characteristics of static electric charge and current electricity, including historical and cultural understanding. [CP, SI, TPS] Level of Thinking Score Deep Understanding 4 In addition to Score 3.0, in-depth inferences and applications that go beyond what was taught. One or more of the indicators is taken to a deeper level of understanding – for example, the student goes beyond the depth of the indicator, uses their knowledge to create a new application, or designs and conducts a personal inquiry on a portion of the content. 3.5 In addition to score 3.0 performance, in-depth inferences and applications with partial success. Creating construct, create, design, write Evaluating appraise, argue, defend, judge Analyzing compare, contrast, test distinguish, differentiate, Applying choose, demonstrate, use 3 The student: k. Differentiates between conductors, insulators, and superconductors in electric circuits – and can discuss function, design and purpose of each. l. Differentiates between a complete circuit, a closed circuit, an open circuit, and a short circuit– and can discuss function, design and purpose of each. j. Designs and safely conduct an investigation to determine the resistance of various materials such as copper wire, Nichrome wire, graphite, rubber tubing, wood, glass, distilled water, and ionic solutions to electric current. e. Uses a technological problem-solving process to design, construct, and evaluate the reliability of a device to detect static electrical charges, such as an electroscope. a. Poses questions to investigate related to static electric charge and current electricity. The student exhibits no major errors or omissions. 2.5 No major errors or omissions regarding 2.0 content and partial knowledge of the 3.0 content. Understanding classify, describe, discuss, explain, identify Remembering define, list, recall, state 2 There are no major errors or omissions regarding the simpler details and processes as the student: c. States the properties of static electrical charges. f. Explains, with reference to electron transfer, the production of static electrical charges in some common materials such as flannel, fur, wood, plastic, rubber, and metal. b. Gathers evidence for the transfer of static electric charges, including charging by friction, charging by conduction, charging by induction, and electrostatic discharge and create written, visual, and/or dramatic representations of those processes. g. Describes the operation of technologies that have been developed based on scientific understanding of static electric charge and discharge (e.g., air filters, fabric softeners, lightning rods, automotive painting, plastic wrap, grounding straps, Van de Graaff generator, and photocopiers). m. Describes the flow of charge in an electrical circuit based on the particle theory of matter and electron transfer. i. Identifies dangers to the human body associated with static electric charge and discharge, and current electricity, and discuss how technologies such as grounding straps, lightning rods, grounded plugs, fuses, and circuit breakers are designed to minimize such dangers. h. Outlines the contributions of people from various cultures to modern understanding of static electric charge and current electricity (e.g., Thales, Robert Boyle, Benjamin Franklin, Michael Faraday, Nikola Tesla, Georg Ohm, Alessandro Volta, André-Marie Ampère, James Wimshurst, and Robert Van de Graaff), and past and present careers that require an understanding of static electric charge and current electricity. d. Examines how the importance of lightning in First Nations and Métis culture is conveyed through stories and legends. 1.5 Partial knowledge of the 2.0 content but major errors or omissions regarding the 3.0 content. 1 With help, a partial understanding of some of the simpler details and processes and some of the more complex ideas and processes..5 With help, a partial understanding of the 2.0 content, but not the 3.0 content. 0 Even with help, no understanding or skill demonstrated.

15 WHAT IS MASTERY? Tim was so learned, that he could name a horse in nine languages; so ignorant, that he bought a cow to ride on. Ben Franklin, 1750 Poor Richards Almanac

16 Anyone can repeat information; its the masterful student who can break content into its component pieces, explain it and alternative perspectives to others and use it purposefully in new situations. Students have mastered content when they demonstrate a thorough understanding as evidenced by doing something substantive with the content beyond merely echoing it. WORKING DEFINITION OF MASTERY

17 Assessment: Measuring learning in a variety of ways.

18 NEED FOR ASSESSMENT REFORM Poor test results for Saskatchewan Students Ontarios success story Importance Of Teaching and Assessing Key Elements of 21 st Century Learning Core subjects taught at higher levels of understanding Learning skills such as information and technology skills, thinking and problem solving skills and interpersonal and self directional skills need to be measured. Teachers and students use real-world applications and experiences that are meaningful and relevant. Assessment needs to measure students against set of learning criteria not other students

19 DEFINE EACH GRADE A – 90% B - 80% C - 70% D - 60 % F - <50%

20 GRADE THE ASSIGNMENT Look at the Grade 8 piece of writing What percentage grade would you give it? What reasons do you have for assigning that percentage grade?

21 RUBRICS ARE VALUABLE BECAUSE... They clarify for teachers, students and parents how learning looks on the continuum (learning always continues; there is no end). They invite a dialogue between teachers and students and provide constructive feedback. They help teachers prepare responsive instruction. They describe the visible evidence of learning. They support the idea of growth – it is okay to need assistance as understanding develops. We do not need to know everything at the beginning. There is always the opportunity to grow.

22 IMPORTANT POINTS ABOUT RUBRICS Rubrics compare students to a defined set of criteria not to other students. Rubrics are not attached to a percent level (ie. 2 = 50%) Levels are not counted as points. (ie. 12/16)

23 GRADE THE ASSIGNMENT BASED UPON RUBRICS AND EXEMPLARS Look at the Grade 8 piece of writing What grade score (1-4) would you give it? What reasons do you have for assigning that grade score? What advice would you give to the student to improve their writing?

24 NORTH EAST SCHOOL DIVISION CURRICULUM CORNER http://curriculum.nesd.ca/

25 REPORT CARD RENEWAL COMMITTEE AND TIME LINES Committee established in the fall of 2010 to create a new and innovative reporting document. The Report Card Committee was made up of three parents, two in-school administrators, three classroom teachers, three central office curriculum personnel, two central office IT personnel Intensive professional development to study best practices when creating an outcomes based report card. ( 2010-12) Creation of focus groups to evaluate the final drafts of the report card: Parent focus group (8 parents representing all school communities), teacher focus groups (representing all grade levels and all school communities), in-school administrators (representing all school communities). (Spring 2012) Meetings held in all schools for both teaching staff and all parent groups. (Spring 2012)

26 RESEARCH MATTERS Anne Davies (Canadian) Sandra Herbst (Canadian) Karen Hume (Canadian) Ken OConnor (Canadian) Damian Cooper (Canadian) Thomas Guskey Robert Marzano Rick Stiggins Larry Ainsworth Rick Wormeli

27 Purpose of LOCCSD Report Card The purpose of this report card is to inform students and parents/guardians of the current levels of achievement on year end provincial learning outcomes/objectives and the LOCCSD Faith, Life and Learning Goals. The report card is intended to communicate learning successes, personal growth, and to guide improvements where needed.

28 FAITH, LIFE AND LEARNING GOALS Students need consistent, scaffolded learning skills from Kindergarten to Grade 12 Students need 21 st Century Learning Skills that will allow them to be lifelong learners Students need to be engaged in their learning and to find meaning in their learning at appropriate levels

29 FAITH, LIFE AND LEARNING GOALS LOCCSD Faith, Life & Learning Goals Goals Requirements and Characteristics of the FLL Goal Behavioral Responsibility: Respects self and others as Jesus taught us. Demonstrates Christ-like character traits (kindness, honesty, courtesy) demonstrates self-control, understanding and empathy skills, manages impulsivity, ethical and moral use of digital media Learning Responsibility: Taking ownership of learning opportunities Completes assigned work, listens attentively, strives for quality in work, arrives prepared and ready for instruction, demonstrates effective use of class time, takes responsibility and learning risks For implementation in the fall of 2013-14 Critical, creative, and innovative thinking and problem solving. Shows initiative, metacognition (is aware of ones own thoughts, strategies, feelings, and actions as to how they learn), remains open to continuous life-long learning, demonstrates curiosity and imagination, persistence, and flexible thinking, applies past knowledge to novel situations, gathers appropriate data, uses effective questioning and problem posing skills Collaboration and leadership in group interactions Demonstrates project based learning skills, collaborative group interactions and dynamics: resolves conflict, thinks interdependently (able to learn from others) Effective oral, written and digital communication Accesses and analyzes information, presents ideas in multiple situations and formats for a variety of audiences, demonstrates media literacy skills (social media, use of current technology)

30 LOCCSD RUBRIC FOR FAITH, LIFE & LEARNING GOALS LOCCSD Student Faith, Life & Learning Goals Achievement Level Description Level 1 Level 2Level 3Level 4 Beginning ApproachingProficiencyMastery Student rarely demonstrates a willingness to participate in activities and requires continual encouragement to complete tasks and expectations. Student seldom fulfills the requirements to demonstrate achievement of the goal. Student sometimes demonstrates a willingness to participate in activities with some encouragement to complete most tasks and expectations however the student only fulfills partial requirements to demonstrate achievement of the goal. The student usually and willingly participates in activities, completes tasks and expectations with care and fulfills most requirements for the task to demonstrate achievement of the goal. Student consistently and eagerly engages in activities, completes all tasks and expectations with care and fulfills all requirements of the task to demonstrate achievement of the goal.

31 THE NEW REPORT CARD: K - 9 Assessments are linked to specific curricular outcomes. Assessments are then grouped according to LOCCSD designed Curricular Focus Areas. Each student is assessed on each outcome but the outcomes are part of a larger Curricular Focus Area.

32 LOCCSD RUBRIC FOR STUDENT ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF CURRICULAR FOCUS AREA (ACCEPTED STANDARD AND DESCRIPTOR ACROSS SASKATCHEWAN) Student Academic Achievement Level Description Level 0 Level 1Level 2Level 3Level 4 Insufficient Evidence (IE) BeginningApproachingProficiencyMastery Insufficient evidence of curricular outcomes to report Indicates partial understanding. Students at this level have limited success with the stated outcome even with support. Indicates a basic understanding. Students at this level demonstrate inconsistent understanding of the stated outcomes. Indicates a well- developed understanding of the grade level outcome. Students at this level are competent with the skills and knowledge identified in the outcome and are on par with curriculum expectations. Indicates an insightful understanding of the grade level outcomes. Students at this level can apply and transfer knowledge to novel situations.

33 LOCCSD CURRICULAR FOCUS AREAS Mathematics: R1R2R3 Curricular Focus Area Grade Score Number Sense: an understanding of numbers, number systems and their related operations. Patterns and Relations: an exploration of patterns and pattern rules in numbers and concrete materials. Statistics and Probability: an understanding of data collection, data representation and the communication of findings as well as determining the probable outcome of specific events. Shape and Space: an awareness of ones surroundings and the ability to represent and describe objects and their interrelationships in space. Comments Mathematics:R1R2R3 Curricular Focus Area Grade Score Number Sense: an understanding of numbers, number systems and their related operations. Patterns and Relations: an exploration of patterns and pattern rules in numbers and concrete materials. Statistics and Probability: an understanding of data collection, data representation and the communication of findings as well as determining the probable outcome of specific events. Shape and Space: an awareness of ones surroundings and the ability to represent and describe objects and their interrelationships in space. Comments

34 Outcome: N7.1 Demonstrate an understanding of division through the development and application of divisibility strategies for 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and 10, and through an analysis of division involving zero. [C, CN, ME, R] Investigate division by 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10 and generalize strategies for determining divisibility by those numbers. Apply strategies for determining divisibility to sort a set of numbers in Venn or Carroll diagrams. Determine or validate the factors of a number by applying strategies for divisibility. Explain the result of dividing a quantity of zero by a non-zero quantity. Explain (by generalizing patterns, analogies, and mathematical reasoning) why division of non-zero quantities by zero is not defined.

35 N7.1 SUGGESTIONS FOR ASSESSMENT KEY IDEA: NATURE OF DIVISION. Sample assessment tasks: Have the students create a presentation (e.g., oral, written, art, dance, song, or drama) to demonstrate their understanding of divisibility and the strategies used to determine factors for a number. These presentations could be assessed using a class designed rubric, checklist, or rating scale. Criteria used for the assessment of the performance might include: originality, correctness, completeness, and clarity. Ask the students to create a Venn diagram and/or Carrol diagram for a given pair of numbers and their factors. Ask the students to identify, with justification, which of a given list of whole numbers are the factors of another whole number. Ask the students to determine the factors common to three or more whole numbers and to come up with a variety of ways to represent the solutions. Have the students explain their strategies for determining the common factors. Have the students explain why division by zero is not defined. Have the students describe a situation in which they would want to determine if a quantity was divisible by a given number, but not necessarily determine the quotient.

36 RUBRIC OUTCOME NUMBER SENSE 7.1 Fully meeting expectations, with enriched understanding (EU) Fully meeting grade level expectations (FM) Mostly meeting grade level expectations (MM) Not yet meeting grade level expectations (NY) Develop and apply divisibility strategies for 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 and 10 in order to demonstrate understanding of division You show a well-developed ability to investigate and generalize divisibility strategies in multiple contexts. You can explain the strategy you are applying and the reasons for it with confidence. You apply strategies with accuracy and validate your factors independently. You can apply your understanding to increasingly complex problems. On your own, you can investigate and generalize, and then apply divisibility strategies, validating the factors in order to justify your work. With some help, you can investigate and generalize divisibility strategies for 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and 10. You sometimes need help applying the strategies in different contexts so continue to practice and become familiar with the strategies so you can do this work on your own with confidence. You are having trouble developing and applying divisibility strategies. Graphic organizers may help you keep track of the strategies. You may need to continue to review your multiplication facts in order to have this relationship become automatic. Analyze division involving zero in order to demonstrate understanding of division You show a well-developed understanding of the complexity of division by a strong understanding of division problems involving zero. You can use patterns, analogies and mathematical reasoning to clearly explain your analyses. You can apply your understanding to increasingly complex problems. On your own, you can analyze division involving zero in order to demonstrate understanding of division. You can support your analysis with examples and details. With some help, you can provide an analysis of division involving zero. Continue to work on your reasoning so you can support your analysis more fully and independently. You are having trouble analyzing division involving zero. What does zero mean? How does it affect division when it is the divisor and the dividend? What is division?

37 LOCCSD Grading Procedure A mean score is calculated for each outcome (4 most recent and most consistent scores). Then a mean score is tabulated for each curricular focus area to create the grade that will be presented on the report card for a focus area.

38 THE NEW LOCCSD REPORT CARD: 10 - 12 Assessments are linked to specific curricular outcomes and objectives. Assessments are then grouped according to LOCCSD designed Focus Areas (new curriculum) or units of study (old curriculum). Assessment is to be done through rubric/criteria based assessment. Using the LOCCSD conversion chart, percentage grades will be generated to support the wish of post secondary educational institutions.

39 Questions?


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