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How to Write and Organized Research Paper. FRUSTERATED? DO YOU FIND YOURSELF SITTING IN FRONT OF YOUR COMPUTER AT 1:00 A.M.? DO YOU HAVE A PILE OF UNORGANIZED.

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Presentation on theme: "How to Write and Organized Research Paper. FRUSTERATED? DO YOU FIND YOURSELF SITTING IN FRONT OF YOUR COMPUTER AT 1:00 A.M.? DO YOU HAVE A PILE OF UNORGANIZED."— Presentation transcript:

1 How to Write and Organized Research Paper

2 FRUSTERATED? DO YOU FIND YOURSELF SITTING IN FRONT OF YOUR COMPUTER AT 1:00 A.M.? DO YOU HAVE A PILE OF UNORGANIZED RESEARCH SITTING IN FRONT OF YOU? DO YOU FIND YOURSELF CUTTING AND PASTING LARGE SECTIONS OF YOUR PAPER AT THE LAST MINUTE? DO YOU FIND THE ASSIGNMENT DESCRIPTION UNCLEAR? If you answered yes to any of these questions, you need help with organizing your research papers!

3 Agenda... 1.We will identify the essential steps in the research writing process. 2.We will give you time management tips to help you plan your research paper. 3.We will help you identify valuable campus support.

4 Breaking down the process... Break Down Assignments 1.Pre-writing Understanding your assignment Brainstorming Research Outlining 2.Writing First draft 3.Post-writing Proofreading and revising

5 Detour... Time Management As soon as you receive your syllabi and discuss it in class, write down all of your due dates in a calendar. Break down your assignments into manageable steps in your calendar (allocate colors if you need to). Assign a due date for each step to ensure you are on track. Make weekly and daily priority lists. Try different managing styles to find one that is right for you.

6 Pre-writing... Gain Clarity 1.Read the assignment carefully. 2.Highlight key information (example: define, argue, analyze, compare, and contrast). What type of paper are you writing (narrative, argumentative, analytical)? 3.Be sure to have the due date highlighted in your academic calendar. 4.If there is evaluation criteria or grading rubric in your syllabi, be sure that area is read carefully and highlighted. 5.If you have ANY questions or need clarification on content, please contact your professor immediately.

7 Pre-writing... Brainstorming Brainstorming stirs up several ideas before narrowing them down to one specific idea. It is a vital step in creating an organized research paper. Brainstorming may take many forms: List Free write Mapping

8 Pre-writing... Brainstorming When you have selected your topic, do a preliminary research scan to be sure you will be able to find information about your topic. Visit Purdy-Kresge and search out titles on this topic. Be sure your instructor approves your choice of topic. Be sure your topic is not too narrow and not too broad. Be prepared to change your initial idea or modify it if it does not seem feasible as a research paper topic.

9 The 3 x 5 Card Method A popular method and may be the key to your organization! Always carry a stack of 3x5 cards with you to record information from the sources you explore. Your entire paper can be drafted on your 3x5 cards before you type it. Be sure to document each source you use on the 3x5 cards. When you have completed your research and have all the information you need to begin typing the first draft of your paper, the 3x5 cards can be arranged in stacks in the order in which the information is to appear in your paper.

10 Outlining... An outline works as the blueprint of your paper and will keep your paper thoroughly organized from the start. The purpose of an outline is to: Help you define the basic purpose and structure of the paper. Help you organize thoughts and lay the groundwork for the first draft. This is the stage where much of your major editing should occur.

11 Outlining... PUTTING THE PUZZLE TOGETHER If you have used the 3x5 card method, typing the first draft of your paper will be much easier. The 3x5 cards, labeled properly, form a structured outline with headings and subheadings, which include all the major points to be covered. Be sure to include section numbers for each 3x5 card so you will know where the information belongs in your outline. You will then be able to arrange your 3x5 cards in the proper order before writing the first draft.

12 Outlining... Example: Topic: Unemployment in America I. Introduction A. Unemployment is a serious matter in our society. B. Many unemployed Americans struggle due to circumstances out of their control: the economy, medical problems, and mental illness are some of the leading causes. (thesis)

13 First Draft Now that you have completed the most time consuming and challenging portion of your research paper, its time to write your first draft. After you have gathered together all notes and materials, think about how you would like to organize your paper. What specific information do you want to include to support your thesis (the point you are writing about or the purpose of your paper)? The first draft must include the following: Introduction Body (Supporting Paragraphs) Conclusion

14 First Draft Introduction The introduction reveals what you are going to tell the reader. The conclusion indicates in summary form what you have told the reader. The supporting paragraphs tell all the rest. Introductions can be one paragraph but can be three or four paragraphs long, depending on the length of the writing assignment. Avoid the mistake of discussing one or more of the main points in the introduction. First, you must catch the reader's attention. Add some background information about your topic. Next you must indicate your thesis statement. Discuss the purpose of your paper the promise of what is to come.

15 First Draft Body The body of the paper may be more challenging to write unless you have prepared a solid outline and have a foundation from which to build. A body paragraph begins with a topic sentence backed up with facts, details, reasons, or examples. You may include quotes or opinions (when they are requested). Paraphrasing is very important. You are developing the opening thesis statement and educating the reader about the topic.

16 First Draft Body Key points to remember in developing supporting paragraphs: Unity - Clearly state the thesis, all supporting paragraphs will back up the thesis. (Note: Avoid using statements like, "In this paper I will...") Support - Provide at least three separate supporting points for the thesis with specific evidence for each of the supporting points. Coherence - Paper will have a clear method of organization with smooth transitions from one idea to the next idea. It has an effective title, an introduction, supporting paragraphs and a conclusion. Sentence structure - Sentences are clear and complete; use adverbs, adjectives, capitals, and periods correctly; eliminate needless words; check your spelling and vary your sentences.

17 First Draft Conclusion Just as the introduction captures the reader's attention, the conclusion should leave the reader thinking about the issues presented while bringing the paper to a logical end. Do not make the mistake of introducing new points that were not developed in the body paragraphs. Never leave the reader hanging, wondering if you forgot to end the paper or left something out. Be sure the ending sounds like an ending, without using conversational language such as, "this is all I have to say," or "this concludes my paper on the topic of _______," or even worse, "The End."

18 Editing and Proofreading Editing Content As you move from introduction to main body to summary and conclusion, strive for unity and coherence. Repeatedly ask yourself, "Do my supporting paragraphs relate to and develop my thesis?" Be sure you can answer these questions: What is the thesis? How does the information presented support the thesis? If the purpose of the paper is to provide information or to make a point or defend a position, does it do so? This is not a time to cut and paste larger sections of the research paper. Read paper aloud.

19 Editing and Proofreading Common Mistakes Sentence fragments Run-on sentences Inconsistent verb tense Missing commas Contractions Consistent voice (first person, second person, third person) APA Style

20 QUICK APA CHECKLIST TITLE PAGE RUNNING HEADS AND PAGE NUMBERS 12 INCH FONT – TIMES NEW ROMAN DOUBLE SPACED ONLY 1 MARGINS ON ALL FOUR SIDES BE SURE YOU HAVE PROPERLY CITED ALL OF YOUR MATERIAL PROPER REFERENCE PAGE CLEARLY LABELED APPENDICES

21 Where can you find help? School of Social Work Writing Tutors Professors Librarians Purdy-Kresge – (313) Peers

22 Thank you! If you need further assistance on organizing your papers, please schedule an appointment with your tutor!


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