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8-9 July 2013, COST IC 1206 Action, Zagreb, Croatia Dr. Oleksandr Pastukhov, Senior Lecturer, Department of Information Policy & Governance University.

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Presentation on theme: "8-9 July 2013, COST IC 1206 Action, Zagreb, Croatia Dr. Oleksandr Pastukhov, Senior Lecturer, Department of Information Policy & Governance University."— Presentation transcript:

1 8-9 July 2013, COST IC 1206 Action, Zagreb, Croatia Dr. Oleksandr Pastukhov, Senior Lecturer, Department of Information Policy & Governance University of Malta also on behalf of Prof Joseph A. Cannataci - Co-ordinating Person for SMART, RESPECT & MAPPING Chair in European Information Policy & Technology Law Faculty of Law, University of Groningen, The Netherlands Head of Department of Information Policy and Governance Faculty of Media and Knowledge Sciences University of Malta

2 The LexConverge story A network of over 50 partner institutions around Europe…and beyond, many partners working together since 1986

3 LexConverge projects since 2008 Projects confirmed and in hand SET-DEV (SIS) - completed CONSENT (SSH) –value 3.1 million Euro - completed PUPIE (CoE – Police use of personal data) SMART (SEC) – 4.3 million Euro (smart surveillance) RESPECT (SEC) – value 4.3 million Euro (surveillance) INGRESS (SEC) value 3 million Euro (biometrics) SIIP – value 15 million Euro (Voice-recognition) EVIDENCE (SEC) – value 1.9 million (electronic evidence) E-CRIME (SEC) – Value 3.2 million (electronic crime) MAPPING (SIS) – value 4 million Euro (Governance, Intellectual Property Rights and Privacy on the Internet)

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5 MIMSI = Massively Integrated Multiple Sensor Installation

6 It doesnt really matter if it looks like this…

7 or like this (…and three is a crowd? )

8 … or like this

9 … or even like this…

10 Though we really give the game away when it looks like this

11 Its when we link VIDEO from CCTV to AUDIO from Microphones in/on the ground

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14 And all forms of sensors for detection of radiation, explosives, gunshots etc.

15 Connect them all up in one (or more) Control Room with several databases = MIMSI

16 MIMSI – geo-location built-in

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18 Risks caused by geo-tagging function in social networking The geotagging function in social networks raises privacy concerns for users. researchers are collecting publicly available, geotagged information from social networks to create a real-time map of where users live, work and socialise.

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23 Examples of risk areas covered by the SECURITY SCIENCES & Information Law

24 Police and criminal justice form part of Internal Security Policy. Data Protection is at the intersection of Security Sciences & INFORMATION POLICY Focus today is on Personal data at risk Surveillance Smart surveillance Social activities susceptible to profiling Civic and public security Non-regulatory as well as regulatory approaches Governance

25 Data Protection has become an important part of Information policy for law enforcement Information Policy with a special focus on Data Protection and information exchange between Law Enforcement Agencies across borders and continents

26 Examples of EU funded research on data protection and surveillance

27 Background Information Tension between: Security, prevention and detection of crime and Privacy and data protection With Police and security forces, the trend is to use more and more technology in an effort to find cost-effective means of deterring and detecting crime Consumers use technology because it is convenient and cost-effective

28 The Importance of these trends The technology used by the Police (eg. CCTV) and that used by consumers (credit cards, internet etc.) generates so much data that the police and security forces do not have (and will never have) enough human resources to sift through it effectively in search of clues or evidence One must give up varying degrees of privacy as a price for security and convenience but a balance must be struck

29 Introduction to the SMART Project What is SMART all about? How does SMART achieve these aims? What are the wider policy implications?

30 What we are first discussing today is Smart Surveillance Definition? In this study smart surveillance is: the use of computer vision and pattern recognition technology to analyse information from situated sensors Adapted from smart video surveillance Ying Li Tian, Lisa Brown, Arun Hanpapur, Max Lu, Andrew Senior, Chiao-fe Shu, IBM smart surveillance systems (S3): event based video surveillance system with an open and extensible framework, Machine Vision and Applications (2008)

31 Whats smart? Automated recognition of individuals and/or pre- determined traits or risk factors/criteria lies at the basis, indeed is the very raison dêtre, of smart surveillance systems. The proliferation of video surveillance devices led to realisation that producing billions of images every day in, say, London is quite useless if one does not have the ability to analyse those images.

32 Particular interest to law enforcement (1) WP2 – Smart Surveillance in Key Area of Application 1 – Border Control WP3 - Smart Surveillance in Key Area of Application 2 – Counterterrorism, law and order (including crowd-control) WP4 - Smart Surveillance in Key Area of Application 3 – Consumer sector multi-purpose mobile devices WP5 - Smart Surveillance in Key Area of Application 4 – E- Government

33 Particular interest to law enforcement (2) WP6 - Review of laws and other regulations governing surveillance WP7 - Review of Laws governing interoperability and data exchange between police/security services WP8 - Underlying Technology Infrastructure WP9 – Smart surveillance in Cyberspace WP12 – Toolkit including best practice guidelines for development of surveillance

34 RESPECT covers areas of surveillance such as CCTV Counter-terrorism finance Social Networking RFID and NFC sensors

35 Structure of the SMART Project EU FP7 Research Grant – effective date & Project commencement 1 st June th June 2011 – Deliverable D1.1. – Project Plan 30 th June 2011 – Deliverable D1.2 – Dissemination & Communications Strategy 30 th November 2011 – D month progress report 30 th November 2011 – D11.1 Bibliography International, multidisciplinary consortium including a variety of higher education learning institutes and research centres around Europe. Research to span over a three year period to 2014

36 SMART Research Consortium The SMART team brings together specialists from the following disciplines with 58 specialists from more than 20 nationalities based within 20 European institutional partners in 15 EU states and Australia: Consumer psychologyApplied ICT Marketing communicationsSociology Evaluation techniques Digital Forensics Project ManagementICT Law Intellectual property & Contract LawPolice. Security and surveillance

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38 Example of a relationship: INTERPOL INTERPOL is partner in 2 projects: SMART, RESPECT, & hosts important meetings INTERPOL helps design, circulate and analyse project questionnaires to its 190 members INTERPOL showcases SMART, RESPECT etc. as part of its commitment to research & innovation INTERPOL liaises with its members re project duties We will be reporting results to you on a regular basis – so influence the future and speak to us!

39 Methodology of SMART Status quo analysis of surveillance practices, legal position and citizen attitudes Status Quo Research includes: Questionnaire sent through INTERPOL to all 190 member states to assess use of smart surveillance technologies in: WP2 – Border Control WP3 – Law Enforcement including counter-terrorism & crowd control WP9 - Surveillance in Cyber-space Various structured questionnaires and interview guidelines for Work Packages investigating WP6 – Legal infrastructure for surveillance regulation WP7 – Interoperability of surveillance systems and legal system Qualitative Research – in depth interviews (F2F) in those states (13) with Consortium Partners

40 Methodology of RESPECT Status quo analysis of ALL surveillance practices,(not just smart ones) their legal position and citizen attitudes Opens with categorization of surveillance types and devising criteria for impact assessment of each technology Status Quo Research includes: Questionnaire sent through INTERPOL to all 190 member states to assess use of surveillance technologies in: WP4 – CCTV WP5 – Data Mining, data storage WP6 - On-line social network analysis (here also builds on CONSENT) WP7 - RFID WP8 – Financial issues (including Counter-terrorism Finance) Quantitative Research – on-line Questionnaire in all EU member states Qualitative Research – in depth interviews (F2F) in those states (13) with Consortium Partners )

41 Influencing the future - SMART Review existing legal instruments such as : - Council of Europe Recommendation R(87)15; - EU Directive 46/1995 on Protection of personal data and; - Council Framework Decision 2008/977/JHA of 27 November 2008 on the protection of personal data processed in the framework of police and judicial cooperation in criminal matters Design a model law which could be adopted across the EU member states providing scalable measures including explicit safeguards for all forms of surveillance especially in furtherance of Section 7 and other parts of Council Framework Decision 2008/977/JHA of 27 November Description of Work now also covers EU Commissions proposal COM(2012) for a Police and Criminal Justice Data Protection Directive or its alternatives which may replace EUs Council Framework Decision 2008/977/JHA of 27 November 2008 on the protection of personal data. (Automated/smart processing covered by Arts 9/11 of alternative (leaked) and published versions)for a Police and Criminal Justice Data Protection Directive

42 Influencing the future - RESPECT Review existing legal instruments such as : - Council of Europe Recommendation R(87)15; - EU Directive 46/1995 on Protection of personal data and; - Council Framework Decision 2008/977/JHA of 27 November 2008 on the protection of personal data processed in the framework of police and judicial cooperation in criminal matters Design a model law as well as operating guidelines which could be adopted across the EU member states providing scalable measures including explicit safeguards for all forms of surveillance (not especially in furtherance of Section 7 and other parts of Council Framework Decision 2008/977/JHA of 27 November Description of Work now also covers EU Commissions proposal COM(2012) for a Police and Criminal Justice Data Protection Directive or its alternatives which may replace EUs Council Framework Decision 2008/977/JHA of 27 November 2008 on the protection of personal datafor a Police and Criminal Justice Data Protection Directive

43 Tying research to policy development SMART (1) The results of the status quo analysis (WP2-8 fed into the First Policy Workshop (Sep 2012) The results of the qualitative research (WP10) and WP 9 will feed into the Second Policy Workshop (Sep 2013) The results of the best practices analysis and the Tool-Kit development will be presented to the Final Conference (February or March 2014)

44 Tying research to policy development (2) The Commission, the Council, the European Parliament all wish to further develop policy on privacy and data protection and then implement this with a collection of measures incl. legislation & international agreements It is expected that, apart from the two policy workshops and the final conference, SMART will also provide interim policy briefs/ad hoc briefings (eg LIBE)

45 Some policy issues The next months in the policy world New Commission Policy options on DP Solving the issue of SWIFT data with USA Converting the HLCG October agreement into a comprehensive US-EU bilateral arrangement Possibly integrating PNR data and eventually Criminal Justice Administration Data (example CFD/977/2008/JHA) into one comprehensive agreement (as suggested by EDPS) Now all of the above as impacted by EC proposal of 25 th January 2012 with draft Directive on Data Protection in Police & Criminal Justice

46 Applicability of Research to Policy It is hoped that through: 1 st Policy Workshop – Sep Florence 2 nd Policy Workshop – Sep Brussels Final Conference – February or May 2014 Ad hoc briefings (Brussels & Strasbourg) The information gathered and analysis generated by SMART will have direct or indirect impact on the creation of policy in regulating surveillance.

47 RESPECT complements and builds on SMART in many ways – synched calendar Expands work from smart to ALL surveillance Kick-off meeting in Rome March st Policy Workshop – Ljubljana, July nd Policy Workshop – Barcelona, September2014 Briefings of LIBE Committee – Interim Policy brief to Commission regarding legal framework: October 2013 and January 2014 Final Conference – 29 October 2014 in Brussels in collaboration with IRISS and SURVEILLE and in March 2015

48 Links to COST IC 1206 Privacy-enhanced (not privacy-crippled) surveillance! Data minimization, e.g. use of PIR sensors, PINs De-identification of surveillance data reversible non-reversible Dumbing down equipment, e.g. tightly coupled video camera & processing unit data processed onboard and discarded leaving only motion, warm-blooded creatures presence & face detection (but not recognition)

49 So… watch this space!

50 Thank you for your attention! Web:


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