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Cloudy Day Becca Hatheway and Lisa Gardiner UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Hands-on and Online Classroom Adventures.

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Presentation on theme: "Cloudy Day Becca Hatheway and Lisa Gardiner UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Hands-on and Online Classroom Adventures."— Presentation transcript:

1 Cloudy Day Becca Hatheway and Lisa Gardiner UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Hands-on and Online Classroom Adventures Bridging Basic Weather Science to Literacy, Arts, and ELL WWW.WINDOWS.UCAR.EDU

2 Workshop plan… UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Classroom Activity: Cloud in a Bottle Overview of Cloud Science and How Clouds Affect the Weather Classroom Activities: Cloud Types and Identification Our Poetic Planet Clouds in Art Online resources from Windows to the Universe

3 Four activities that make connections between the science of clouds, art and literacy: UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Available at Windows to the Universe (www.windows.ucar.edu), a University Corporation for Atmospheric Research educational project. Students explore…Classroom Activity …the conditions needed for clouds to form. Cloud in a Bottle …the different types of clouds.Cloud Viewer …clouds in the sky and write poetry about nature, including clouds and weather. Our Poetic Planet …how Western artists have represented clouds in landscape paintings. Clouds in Art

4 Cloud in a Bottle UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu In this activity, students learn how clouds form by making a cloud in a bottle. There must be three main ingredients present in order for clouds to form: Moisture – there must be sufficient water vapor in the air to build a cloud Cooling air – the air temperature must decrease enough for water vapor to condense Condensation nuclei – tiny particles such as dust provide surfaces on which water molecules can gather and condense into water droplets

5 Cloud in a Bottle, Version 1 Use a bottle cap retro-fitted with a tire valve and air freshener 1.Add a small amount of water to the bottle. 2.Spray the air freshener into the bottle. Swirl the water around so the air freshener mixes in. 3.Pump up the bottle to a fixed pressure (30 pso/2 bars). The air in the bottle will warm as you do this. 4.Let the bottle cool to room temperature. 5.Let the air out of the valve using the sucker stick and observe. 6.What happened? 7.You can do this with a second bottle that doesnt have air freshener in it, and compare the two.

6 UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Cloud in a Bottle, Version 2 Use a Fizz-keeper and matches to create a cloud 1.Record the initial temperature of the bottle. 2.Pump the Fizz Keeper 20 times. Record the temperature. Pump the Fizz keeper 20 more times. Record the temperature. Repeat this two more times so you have recorded the temperature after 60 and 80 pumps. 3.Unscrew the Fizz Keeper and record the temperature of the bottle. 4.Now pour a small amount of water into the bottle. Light a match and drop it into the bottle. Quickly screw the Fizz Keeper on the bottle and repeat steps 1-3 above. 5.What happened after you unscrewed the Fizz Keeper the final time?

7 Discussion: How Do Clouds Form? There are four main ways clouds form: Surface Heating Mountains and Terrain Air masses being forced to rise Weather fronts (cold or warm) All of these processes involve the cooling of air and the presence of condensation nuclei. Eventually, enough water vapor will condense upon condensation nuclei to form a cloud. The water droplets may fall down to Earth in the form of rain or snow.

8 The sun heats the Earth, which heats the air The warm air is lighter and less dense and begins to rise When it rises, it expands because of the lower pressures that exist at higher levels in the atmosphere When air expands because of a drop in pressure it also cools The cooling air cant hold all the water vapor, so it begins to condense into water droplets Eventually, enough moisture condenses out of the air parcel to form a cloud Cumulonumbus, cumulus, and stratocumulus clouds form this way Cloud Formation Due to Surface Heating

9 Some clouds form when air encounters a mountain range or other types of terrain The air rises over the mountain and cools, and forms a cloud Cumulonimbus and cumulus clouds form this way Cloud Formation Due to Mountains

10 Some clouds form when air at the surface is forced to rise. This happens from three different processes In a low pressure system, wind moves into the center from all directions (from high to low pressure). When it meets at the center there is no where to go but up. Air is forced to rise when it is traveling over land that slopes upward. The air cools as it rises, and eventually clouds will form. Weather fronts produce clouds by causing air to rise when the lighter warm air flows over the heavier cool air All cloud types are formed by these processes, especially altocumulus, altostratus, cirrocumulus, stratocumulus, and stratus Clouds Formed by Air Being Forced to Rise

11 Weather fronts occur when two large masses of air collide at the Earths surface – these can cause clouds to form Warm fronts produce clouds when warm air replaces cold air by sliding over it Warm fronts produce many types of clouds: altocumulus, altostratus, cirrocumulus, cirrostratus, cirrus, cumulonimbus, nimbostratus, stratocumulus, and stratus Cold fronts occur when heavy cold air displaces lighter warm air, pushing it upward Cold fronts produce cumulus, cumulonimbus, nimbostratus, stratocumulus, and stratus clouds Cloud Formation Due to Weather Fronts

12 UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Cloud Types Clouds can be divided into groups mainly based on the height of the clouds base above the Earths surface

13 UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Cloud #1 This is an image of cirrus clouds. These clouds are thin, wispy, and feathery.

14 UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Cloud #2 This is an image of cumulus clouds. They are puffy white or light gray clouds that look like floating cotton balls, have sharp outlines, and have a flat base.

15 UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Cloud #3 This is an image of stratocumulus clouds. These clouds are low, lumpy, and gray.

16 UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Cloud #4 This is an image of altocumulus clouds. These clouds can be in groups or rows.

17 UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Cloud #5 This is an image of cumulonimbus clouds. These clouds are large, have an anvil-shaped top, and are associated with thunderstorms.

18 UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Clouds in Art Clouds in Art Interactive Students explore how Western artists have represented clouds in landscape paintings while honing their cloud identification skills and making their own cloud paintings.

19 UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Our Poetic Planet Students make observations of clouds and weather and write poetry about nature about what they observed.

20 UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Our Poetic Planet Poetry about clouds, weather, and other aspects of the Earth can be very descriptive. Poetry is a form of expression that allows students to write about their observations about the natural world. Share published poems with students Discuss different types of poetry Create a word wall with your class to give them descriptive words to use in their poems (good strategy for learning readers and English language learners)

21 UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Science and Literacy for English Language Learners Science process skills are almost the same as language learning skills. Science provides great content that serves as a back bone for language acquisition Science Process Skills Observing Predicting Communicating Classifying Analyzing Language Learning Skills Seeking information Comparing Ordering Synthesizing Evaluating

22 UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Examples of Poetry about Weather and Clouds FOG The fog comes on little cat feet. It sits looking over harbor and city on silent haunches and then moves on. - Carl Sandburg

23 UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Examples of Poetry about Weather and Clouds With rushing winds and gloomy skies The dark and stubborn Winter dies: Far-off, unseen Spring faintly cries, Bidding her earliest child arise; March! - Bayard Taylor

24 UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Examples of Poetry about Weather and Clouds sun: the sun is like a gentle golden pony rising in the morning, wind: the wind is like a happy kitten rustling the branches, rain: the rain is like a cup spilling over the valley, rainbow: the rainbow is like a towel wiping up the spill, mountains: the mountains are sleeping dragons in a long chain. By Sophie, 2nd grader, Roanoke, VA

25 UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Examples of Poetry about Weather and Clouds Snowflakes fall gently Fluttering to the ground Winter is still here. By Elaine, 5th grader, Boulder, CO

26 UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Poetry submissions on Windows to the Universe

27 http://www.windows.ucar.edu

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29 http://www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/earth/Atmosphere/cloud.html

30 Three levels of content to connect with a broad audience

31 UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Windows to the Universe Educator Newsletter Sign up now!

32 UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Are you looking for an online Professional Development Opportunity? Climate Discovery, a series of online professional development courses for middle and high school educators Summer Semester – June 19 to August 9, 2009 CD 501 – Introduction to Climate Change CD 502 – Earth System Science: A Climate Change Perspective CD 503 – Understanding Climate Change Today For registration information visit http://ecourses.ncar.ucar.edu

33 UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu Windows to the Universe staff are presenting one more workshop during NSTA in New Orleans: Sunday, March 22, 11 AM – 12 PM WALLS (Water, Air, Land, Life, and Space)! – Morial Convention Center, room 226

34 UCAR Office of Education and Outreach, Boulder, CO, www.eo.ucar.edu For more information, visit Windows to the Universe or email Becca at hatheway@ucar.edu WWW.WINDOWS.UCAR.EDU


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