Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Trend and change analysis in an Australian surveillance system Associate Professor Anne Taylor South Australian Department of Health University of Adelaide.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Trend and change analysis in an Australian surveillance system Associate Professor Anne Taylor South Australian Department of Health University of Adelaide."— Presentation transcript:

1 Trend and change analysis in an Australian surveillance system Associate Professor Anne Taylor South Australian Department of Health University of Adelaide Eleonora Dal Grande, Tiffany Gill, Zumin Shi Population Research & Outcome Studies, SA Health Michele Herriot Health Promotion, SA Health

2 2 Background The importance of evidence to Health Promotion – Range of sources – Health surveys risk factor surveillance Flexibility Addition of time Seasonal trends Trends over time Difference between surveys and surveillance - The ways things were vs the way things are changing

3 3 Outline of presentation Surveillance in Australia Examples/results from South Australia What challenges we face

4 4 History of surveillance in Australia South Australia Northern Territory Western Australia Queensland New South Wales Victoria Tasmania Surveillance system No surveillance system Adaptation

5 5 Surveillance in Australia COAG (Council of Australian Governments) – Laying the foundations for healthy behaviours in the daily lives of Australians – ($A448.1m over 4 yrs) – reward payments National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health

6 6 Surveillance in Australia CATI infrastructure ($A10m over 4 yrs) – National consistency Questions Measurement Sampling frame – Minimum sample sizes Indicators (adults & children) -Fruit & vegetables -Physical activity -Healthy weight -Smoking

7 7 South Australian Monitoring & Surveillance System (SAMSS) Commenced July 2002 – Continuous chronic disease and risk factor surveillance system – CATI (Computer Assisted Telephone Interviews) – n = 600 per month – Random selection of South Australians of all ages (0+ years)

8 8 Sampling Australia – Electronic White Pages 2004 privacy legislation – Random Digit Dialling All telephone numbers included in IPND (Integrated Public Number Database) – (fixed line, mobile, public/private payphone, freecall) included in 1 database (listed and unlisted)

9 9 Data use Prevalence, change in estimates, trends Description of at risk populations Geographic distribution of illness/risk factors Detecting epidemics Generating hypotheses Facilitating planning

10 10 Data use Importance of continuous data collection – Provide trends – Timeliness – Aggregation over time

11 11 Fruit and vegetable consumption

12 12 Mean Serves of Mean serves of fruit per day – Adults aged 18 years and over Data Source: SAMSS

13 13 Mean serves of fruit per day – Children aged 5 to 17 years Data Source: SAMSS

14 14 Mean Serves of Mean serves of vegetables per day – Adults aged 18 years and over Data Source: SAMSS

15 15 Mean serves of vegetables per day – Children aged 5 to 17 years Data Source: SAMSS

16 16 Fruit and vegetable consumption campaign Go for 2&5 Campaign® – Awareness raising and educating – Comprehensive media campaign May-June 2005 – National and State based activities – $A100,000 in SA; Nationally $A4.75 million – Go for 2&5 Fruit and Vegetable man events

17 17 Fruit & vegetable consumption campaign

18 18 Proportion eating 5+ serves vegetables/day (pre and post campaign) Data Source: SAMSS

19 19 Proportion eating 5+ serves vegetables/day (pre and post campaign) by gender Data Source: SAMSS

20 20 Proportion eating 5+ serves vegetables/day (pre and post campaign) by BMI Data Source: SAMSS

21 21 Proportion eating 2+ serves fruit/day (pre and post campaign) Data Source: SAMSS

22 22 Proportion eating 2+ serves fruit/day (pre and post campaign) by gender Data Source: SAMSS

23 23 Proportion eating 2+ serves fruit/day (pre and post campaign) by BMI Data Source: SAMSS

24 24 Physical Activity

25 25 Sufficient physical activity – Adults 18 years and over Data source: SAMSS, age 18 years and over

26 26 60 minutes of physical activity per day – Children 5 to 15 years Data source: SAMSS, age years

27 27 Proportion undertaking sufficient physical activity (adults) Data Source: SAMSS

28 28 Proportion undertaking sufficient physical activity by BMI (adults) Data Source: SAMSS

29 29 Proportion undertaking sufficient physical activity by gender (adults) Data source: SAMSS, age 16 years and over

30 30 Proportion undertaking sufficient physical activity by SEIFA (adults) Data source: SAMSS, age 16 years and over

31 31 Proportion undertaking sufficient physical activity by overall health status (adults) Data source: SAMSS, age 16 years and over

32 32 Proportion undertaking sufficient physical activity by smoking status (adults) Data source: SAMSS, age 16 years and over

33 33 Smoking

34 34 Data source: SAMSS, age 16 years and over Smoking – Adults aged 16 years and over

35 35 Proportion of adults smoking Data source: SAMSS, age 16 years and over

36 36 Proportion of adult smokers by gender Data source: SAMSS, age 16 years and over 2002 to 2010

37 37 Smoking policy and legislation Dec 2004 – Smoke-free workplaces and public areas except licensed hospitality venues May 2007 – Ban on smoking in cars with children under 16 years Nov 2007 – All public areas smoke-free, including hospitality venues – Current policy targeting retail sales displays

38 38 Proportion of adults reporting smoking undertaken in the home Data source: SAMSS, age 16 years and over

39 39 Healthy Weight

40 40 Data source: SAMSS, age 18 years and over Unhealthy weight – Adults aged 18 years and over

41 41 Unhealthy weight – Children aged years Data source: SAMSS, age 5-17 years

42 42 Proportion of adults reporting overweight/obese (BMI >25) Data source: SAMSS, age 16 years and over

43 43 Proportion of adults reporting overweight/obese (BMI > 25) by gender Data source: SAMSS, age 16 years and over

44 44 Proportion of adults reporting overweight/obese (BMI > 25) by age Data source: SAMSS, age 16 years and over

45 45 Proportion of adults reporting overweight/obese (BMI > 25) by income Data source: SAMSS, age 16 years and over

46 46 What challenges do we face? In Australia - continued harmonization – State-based system – Conflicting goals Aim of all surveillance systems – Improvement on health outcomes – Value for money – Use of data An effective risk factor surveillance system will provide the evidence for change

47 47 Challenges - Sampling Scientific Known probability of selection Random Power System approach Population framework Limited by : – Needs/resources available

48 48 Challenges - Questions Standards Best practice guidelines Question development – Cognitive testing – Field testing Use of modules Flexibility but consistency Reliability/validity

49 49 Challenges In Australia -Too many different systems Harmonization -Questions (SNAPS) No national conference No governing committee -Informal vs formal

50 50 Challenges - Data collection Telephones Mixed mode Regular & sustained Issues – Response rates – Cultural differences Importance of quality assurance in all aspects

51 51 Challenges Dissemination – We have room for improvement – The use of the media & relationship with media – Explore more options The power of collaboration – Partners

52 52 Challenges - Sustainability/continuity Long term commitment - cost Show a difference/make a difference Be useful as an evidence provider

53 53 Contact Details Anne Taylor Population Research & Outcome Studies (PROS) South Australian Department of Health University of Adelaide PROS Website:


Download ppt "Trend and change analysis in an Australian surveillance system Associate Professor Anne Taylor South Australian Department of Health University of Adelaide."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google