Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Improving Education: A triumph of hope over experience Robert Coe Inaugural Lecture, Durham University, 18 June 2013.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Improving Education: A triumph of hope over experience Robert Coe Inaugural Lecture, Durham University, 18 June 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 Improving Education: A triumph of hope over experience Robert Coe Inaugural Lecture, Durham University, 18 June 2013

2 A triumph of hope over experience Experience –Have educational standards really risen? –School improvement: Isnt it time there was some? –Can we identify effective schools and teachers? –Is evidence-based practice and policy the answer? Hope –So what should we do (that hasnt failed yet)? 2

3 Have educational standards really risen? 3

4 4

5 5 Equivalent change in GCSE grades

6 6 (Updated from Coe, 2007)

7 ICCAMS (Hodgen et al) 7

8 School improvement: Isnt it time there was some? 8

9 1.Wait for a bad year or choose underperforming schools to start with. Most things self-correct or revert to expectations (you can claim the credit for this). 2.Take on any initiative, and ask everyone who put effort into it whether they feel it worked. No-one wants to feel their effort was wasted. 3.Define improvement in terms of perceptions and ratings of teachers. DO NOT conduct any proper assessments – they may disappoint. 4.Only study schools or teachers that recognise a problem and are prepared to take on an initiative. Theyll probably improve whatever you do. Mistaking School Improvement (1) (Coe, 2009)

10 5.Conduct some kind of evaluation, but dont let the design be too good – poor quality evaluations are much more likely to show positive results. 6.If any improvement occurs in any aspect of performance, focus attention on that rather than on any areas or schools that have not improved or got worse (dont mention them!). 7.Put some effort into marketing and presentation of the school. Once you start to recruit better students, things will improve. Mistaking School Improvement (2) (Coe, 2009)

11 Can we identify effective schools and teachers? 11

12 Problems with school effectiveness research Value-added is not effectiveness (Gorard, 2010; Dumay, Coe & Anumendem, 2013) Characteristics of effective schools –strong leadership, high expectations, positive climate and a focus on teaching and learning –Too vague –Effects are tiny anyway (Scheerens, 2000, 2012) Correlations, not causes (Coe & Fitz-Gibbon, 1998) –Can effective strategies be implemented? –If so, do they lead to improvement? 12

13 Is evidence-based practice and policy the answer? 13

14 Toolkit of Strategies to Improve Learning The Sutton Trust-EEF Teaching and Learning Toolkit

15 Impact vs cost Cost per pupil Effect Size (months gain) £0 0 8 £1000 Meta-cognitive Peer tutoring Early Years 1-1 tuition Homework (Secondary) Mentoring Summer schools After school Aspirations Performance pay Teaching assistants Smaller classes Ability grouping Promising May be worth it Not worth it Feedback Phonics Homework (Primary) Collaborative Small gp tuition Parental involvement Individualised learning ICT Behaviour Social

16 Some things that are popular or widely thought to be effective are probably not worth doing –Ability grouping (setting); After-school clubs; Teaching assistants; Smaller classes; Performance pay; Raising aspirations Some things look promising –Effective feedback; Meta-­cognitive and self regulation strategies; Peer tutoring/peer assisted learning strategies; Homework Key messages

17 Clear, simple advice: Choose from the top left Go back to school and do it 17 For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong H.L. Mencken

18 Why not? We have been doing some of these things for a long time, but have generally not seen improvement Research evidence is problematic –Sometimes the existing evidence is thin –Research studies may not reflect real life –Context and support factors may matter (Cartwright and Hardie, 2012) Implementation is problematic –We may think we are doing it, but are we doing it right? –We do not know how to get large groups of teachers and schools to implement these interventions in ways that are faithful, effective and sustainable 18

19 So what should we do (that hasnt failed yet)? 19

20 Four steps to improvement Think hard about learning Invest in effective professional development Evaluate teaching quality Evaluate impact of changes

21 1. Think hard about learning

22 Impact vs cost Cost per pupil Effect Size (months gain) £0 0 8 £1000 Meta-cognitive Peer tutoring Early Years 1-1 tuition Homework (Secondary) Mentoring Summer schools After school Aspirations Performance pay Teaching assistants Smaller classes Ability grouping Promising May be worth it Not worth it Feedback Phonics Homework (Primary) Collaborative Small gp tuition Parental involvement Individualised learning ICT Behaviour Social

23 Impact vs cost Cost per pupil Effect Size (months gain) £0 0 8 £1000 Meta-cognitive Peer tutoring Homework (Secondary) After school Aspirations Performance pay Teaching assistants Smaller classes Ability grouping Feedback Phonics Collaborative Does your theory of learning explain why … These work? These dont?

24 Poor Proxies for Learning Students are busy: lots of work is done (especially written work) Students are engaged, interested, motivated Students are getting attention: feedback, explanations Classroom is ordered, calm, under control Curriculum has been covered (ie presented to students in some form) (At least some) students have supplied correct answers (whether or not they really understood them or could reproduce them independently) 24

25 Learning happens when people have to think hard A simple theory of learning

26 Hard questions about your school How many minutes does an average pupil on an average day spend really thinking hard? Do you really want pupils to be stuck in your lessons? If they knew the right answer but didnt know why, how many pupils would care? 26

27 2. Invest in effective CPD

28 How do we get students to learn hard things? Eg Place value Persuasive writing Music composition Balancing chemical equations Explain what they should do Demonstrate it Get them to do it (with gradually reducing support) Provide feedback Get them to practise until it is secure Assess their skill/ understanding

29 How do we get teachers to learn hard things? Eg Using formative assessment Assertive discipline How to teach algebra Explain what they should do

30 Intense: at least 15 hours, preferably 50 Sustained: over at least two terms Content focused: on teachers knowledge of subject content & how students learn it Active: opportunities to try it out & discuss Supported: external feedback and networks to improve and sustain Evidence based: promotes strategies supported by robust evaluation evidence What (probably) makes CPD effective?

31 3. Evaluate teaching quality

32 Every teacher needs to improve, not because they are not good enough, but because they can be even better. Dylan Wiliam

33 Sources of evidence: 1.Colleagues (peers, SMs) observing lessons 2.Trained outsiders observing lessons 3.Pupils test score gains 4.Progress in NC levels (from teacher assessment) 5.Pupils ratings of teacher/lesson quality 6.Teacher qualifications 7.Tests of teachers content knowledge 8.Parents ratings 9.Ofsted ratings 10.Colleagues (including senior managers) perceptions 11.Teachers self-evaluation Identifying the best teachers

34 Next generation of CEM systems … Assessments that are –Comprehensive, across the full range of curriculum areas, levels, ages, topics and educationally relevant abilities –Diagnostic, with evidence-based follow-up –Interpretable, calibrated against norms and criteria –High psychometric quality Feedback that is –Bespoke to individual teacher, for their students and classes –Multi-component, incorporating learning gains, pupil ratings, peer feedback, self-evaluation, … –Diagnostic, with evidence-based follow-up Constant experimenting 34

35 4. Evaluateimpact of changes

36 We are sure this works This is so important we need it to work Everyone is working really hard and fully committed to this Evaluating would be a lot of work We dont have the data to be able to evaluate We dont know how to evaluate We cant do a really good evaluation, so what is the point of doing it badly? We do happy sheets and ask people what they thought of it; isnt that enough? You cant do randomised trials in education What works is different in different schools or contexts Bad reasons not to evaluate

37 Clear, well defined intervention Good assessment of appropriate outcomes Well-matched comparison group Key elements of good evaluation

38 A triumph of hope over experience Experience –So far, we havent cracked it: dont keep doing the same things Hope –Think hard about learning –Invest in effective professional development –Evaluate teaching quality –Evaluate impact of changes 38


Download ppt "Improving Education: A triumph of hope over experience Robert Coe Inaugural Lecture, Durham University, 18 June 2013."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google