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Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, The Charter for Inclusive Teaching.

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Presentation on theme: "Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, The Charter for Inclusive Teaching."— Presentation transcript:

1 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, The Charter for Inclusive Teaching and Learning INNSBRUCK Ann Heelan Stephen Kennedy

2 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, A Socially Inclusive Institution Higher education must accept that the implications of offering access to non- traditional students do not end, but rather begin, at the point of entry (Bamber and Tett 2001)

3 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability,

4 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability,

5 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, Societal demands Paradigm shift Inputs to outputs: Bologna Process Teaching to learning Diversity in student population Reduced funding Why?:

6 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, Resistance/Barriers Attitude, the student is the problem Lack of understanding Fairness –“we don’t allow other normal student to use proof readers” Responsibility –“ academic departments see it as the responsibility of the disability office”

7 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, Resistance /Barriers Assumptions and beliefs about teaching “academic identity” –Scholar –Researcher –subject Impact of disability

8 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, Academic Culture Teaching and learning methods Academic Culture shock –Language –Teaching methods Relationships/remoteness with staff Numbers

9 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability,

10 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability,

11 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, Charter for Inclusive Teaching and Learning Teaching Learning Assessment and examinations Quality Assurance

12 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, Teaching At a minimum: The institution provides students with access to course materials, including on-line, before the lecture where possible, so students can fully engage with the lecture. Staff use creative and innovative teaching methods and integrate, where required, the 7 principles of universal design. Learning outcomes and assessment approaches are clearly stated for all student courses/programmes. All academic staff teach in accessible formats. This may require some professional development in consultation with learning support and disability support services. The institution provides training and support to staff to further develop expertise in teaching and learning. Teaching is implemented in a manner that allows all students to fully take part in all activities and minimises the need for additional adjustments. Staff use information and communication technologies to meet the learning needs of students.

13 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, 7 principles of universal design Equitable Use Flexibility Simple and intuitive Perceptible information Tolerance for error Low physical effort Size and space

14 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability,

15 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, Classroom as the place of engagement Active not Passive –Involvement and choice Student centred learning –Meaningful activities –Understanding expected outcomes –Independent learning Interaction with staff Formative Feedback Learner Autonomy Liz Thomas Edge Hill University

16 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, Learning At a minimum: Study skills are a clearly articulated part of the curriculum for all students, including students with disabilities, and are expressed in course/programme as learning outcomes. Students and staff make maximum use of timely, constructive and relevant feedback in the learning process, given that it is a key component of student achievement. Students, for their part, engage as partners in the learning process. Active learning is an integral part of all course provision. Standards of learning are improved through formative assessment and continuous feedback on performance. The curriculum is designed and delivered in a manner that respects that everyone learns in different ways and that learning outcomes can be achieved in many ways.

17 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, Assessment and Examinations At a minimum: The institution considers the most appropriate and balanced methods to assess learning outcomes. When assessing students’ learning, whether through continuous assessment or end-of-year assessment, a range of approaches, where practical, are offered. The institution offers a choice of assessment, thus reducing the need for reasonable accommodations. (This does not exclude reasonable accommodations identified in an assessment of need). The institution provides clear information to students on the assessment methodologies used and the marking schemes employed. The institution provides students with timely information on assessment, when and how, and in an accessible format. This also provides for any extraordinary accommodations to be put in place. Assessment and examinations are student-centred, flexible, transparent and fair The assessment methodologies match the stated learning outcomes.

18 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, Choice of Assessment Methods Empowers Students Reduces the need for special accommodations

19 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, Choice “The choice was good to have as some people don’t do well with just one final exam and are better suited to continuous assessment” Dr. Geraldine O’Neill, 2005 Student Centred Learning

20 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, Student voice Seek feedback on teaching methods Student Suggestion box Ensure they understand the learning outcomes, what is expected of them

21 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, Quality Assurance At a minimum: The inclusion of students with disabilities is embedded within existing quality assurance procedures, with a code of good practice to guide implementation. Each institution captures the voice of the student with a disability and actively uses that voice to effect improvements. Institutions have quality assurance procedures that capture the voice of all students including students with disabilities and those from other minority groups.

22 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, Strategies for Implementation Institutional change needed –Student engagement –Assumptions and perceptions Top down and bottom up –Importance of senior staff –Visible enthusiasm –Shared understanding of inclusion –Act as a role model

23 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, Contd.. TIC Principles ( Trinity College) –Think beyond disability – good for all students –Buy in from senior staff –Be a resource to teaching staff –Take a whole college approach –Provide tools and templates –Provide templates and checklists

24 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, Question 1.What engages the student? 2.What positive teaching and learning initiatives include all students?

25 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, References Improving student Retention in higher education, 2009, Liz Thomas Edge Hill University UK O’Neill, g, McMahon t 2005 Student –Centred Learning: What does it mean Rose and Shevlin 2010, Count me In, Ideas for actively engaging students in Inclusive Classroom

26 Association for Higher Education Access and Disability, Thank You


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