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PA Literacy Design Collaborative: Common Core Standards 1.

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Presentation on theme: "PA Literacy Design Collaborative: Common Core Standards 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 PA Literacy Design Collaborative: Common Core Standards 1

2 If students are not proficient when they enter a course, what is the chance that teachers will stop, drop and teach them to read and write? 2

3 LDC Framework The Literacy Design Collaborative teaching task provides a blueprint for seamlessly integrating literacy and content standards in a rigorous, authentic classroom experience. After determining the discipline, course, and grade level, educators use teaching tasks built around predefined template prompts. The teaching task requires students to read, analyze and comprehend written materials and then write cogent arguments, explanations or narratives in the subjects they are studying. 3

4 LDC Link to Common Core 4

5 1. There are three main categories of Writing Types based on CCSS: Argumentation (CCSS for Writing, Standard 1) Informational or Explanatory (CCSS for Writing, Standard 2) Narrative (CCSS for Writing, Standard 3) 2. Within those writing types, there are 9 important text structures (sometimes called modes of discourse) that the CCSS require students to be able to do: Definition: explaining the explicit and implicit meanings of a concept, topic or idea Description: providing details that illustrate a character, place or event Procedural-Sequential: relating chronological or sequential events in some order Synthesis: summarizing; integrating important elements of an idea, concept or topic Analysis: examining by breaking down the elements of an idea, topic, concept issue or theme Comparison: contrasting similarities and differences Evaluation: providing a point of view based on a set of principles or criteria; critiquing; recommending Problem-Solution: examining a problem and proposing a solution(s) Cause-Effect: identifying a cause for an event or condition and examining the effect(s) 5

6 LDC Plan All LDC tasks require students to: Read, analyze, and comprehend texts as specified by the common core Write products as specified by the common core (focusing on argumentation, informational/explanatory, and narrative) Apply common core literacy standards to content (ELA, social studies, and/or science) The tasks are designed to ensure that students receive literacy and content instruction in rigorous academic reading and writing tasks that prepare them for success in college by the end of their high school career. 6

7 Task 2 Template (Argumentative/Analysis L1, L2, L3): [Insert essential question] After reading _____ (literature or informational texts), write an _________(essay or substitute) that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the text(s). L2 Be sure to acknowledge competing views. L3 Give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your position. 7

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9 Template Tasks Task 11: After researching ________ (informational texts) on ________ (content), write a ________ (report or substitute) that defines ________ (term or concept) and explains ________ (content). Support your discussion with evidence from your research. L2 What ________ (conclusions or implications) can you draw? (Informational or Explanatory/ Definition) Task 2: [Insert question] After reading ________ (literature or informational texts), write ________ (essay or substitute) that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the text(s). L2 Be sure to acknowledge competing views. L3 Give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your position. (Argumentation/Analysis) 9

10 Task Examples Task 11: After researching primary & secondary sources on American Imperialism during the late 19th and early 20th century, write an essay that defines Imperialism and explains the impact of American imperialism on the politics and economy of the United States during this time period. Support your discussion with evidence from your research. What implications can you draw regarding the effect of American imperialism on the United States status as a global power? Task 2: As the concerns over global warming increase, is the use of Uranium and nuclear fission the best method for producing energy for civilian use? After reading scientific sources, write a report that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the texts. Be sure to acknowledge competing views and give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your position. (Argumentation/Analysis) 10

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12 Planning Format 12

13 Standards Aligned PA Academic Standards 1.4.6.C Write persuasive pieces. Include a clearly stated position or opinion. Include and develop supporting points using meaningful, convincing evidence, properly cited. 1.4.7.C Write persuasive pieces. Include a clearly stated position or opinion. Include convincing, elaborated, and properly cited evidence. Identify appropriate persuasive techniques to anticipate reader concerns and arguments 1.4.8.C Write persuasive pieces. Include a clearly stated position or opinion. Include convincing, elaborated, and properly cited evidence. Anticipate and counter reader concerns and arguments. 3.1.6.A13.1.6.A1 Describe the similarities and differences of major physical characteristics in plants, animals, fungi, protists, and bacteria. 3.1.7.A1 Describe the similarities and differences of physical characteristics in diverse organisms. Common Core Standards CCR.R.1CCR.R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. CCR.R.3CCR.R.3 Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text. CCR.R.8CCR.R.8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. CCR.R.9CCR.R.9 Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. CCR.W.1CCR.W.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. CCR.W.4CCR.W.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. CCR.W.9CCR.W.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. CCR.W.10CCR.W.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences. 13

14 What Task? Did President Franklin Roosevelts New Deal policies effectively address the problems of the Great Depression (eg. Unemployment, poverty, overproduction of goods, unequal distribution of wealth, lack of economic regulation, etc.)? After reading several primary and secondary sources about the Great Depression and New Deal, write an essay that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the texts. L2 Be sure to acknowledge competing views. L3 Give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your position. (Argumentation/Analysis). 14

15 What Skills? PACING: 3 class periods SKILL AND DEFINITION: Active Reading: Ability to understand necessary reading strategies needed for the task and develop an understanding of a text by locating words and phrases that identify key concepts and facts, or information. PRODUCT AND PROMPT: Annotated Articles: Use annotation techniques and other reading strategies to demonstrate your reading process and your level of interaction with the text. Vocabulary List In your notebook, list words and phrases essential to the texts. Add definitions and (If appropriate) notes on connotation in the context. SCORING (PRODUCT MEETS EXPECTATIONS IF IT…): Annotated or actively read article has a variety of marks (circles, underlining, stars, highlights, etc.). Annotation also includes written questions, connections, and insights in the margins. * Use annotation rubric to provide students feedback on their reading. 15

16 What Texts? READING PROCESS David Kennedy & Thomas Bailey, The American Spirit, Vol. II, (Boston/New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2006) A Boy in Chicago Writes to President Roosevelt (1936) Republicans Roast Roosevelt (1940) Assessing the New Deal (1935, 1936) Allen Winkler, The New Deal: Accomplishments and Failures, (Oxford, Ohio: Testimony before the US Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, 2009) Document A: Meridel Lesueur, New Masses, January 1932 Document B: Letter to Senator Robert Wagner, March 7, 1934 Document C: Cartoon, The Evening Star (Washington, D.C.), April 26, 1934 Document D: William Lloyd Garrison, Jr., The Hand of Improvidence, The Nation, Nov. 1934 Document E: Poster for Social Security, 1935 Document F: Charles Evans Hughes, majority opinion, Schechter v. United States, 1935 Document G: NBC radio broadcast, John L. Lewis, December 13, 1936 Document H: The New Deal in Review editorial in The New Republic, May 20, 1940 Document I: The Roosevelt Record, editorial in The Crisis, November 1940 Document J: Chart, Unemployment of nonfarm workers by percentage and number 16

17 What Skills? WRITING PROCESS PACING: 1 class period SKILL AND DEFINITION: Initiation of Task: Ability to establish a controlling idea and consolidate information relevant to task. PRODUCT AND PROMPT: Lead Paragraph: Write a formal claim in your Writers Notebook using your quick-writes, notes, and article information to ensure a strong controlling idea. Write a draft introduction that will set the context for your claim. SCORING (PRODUCT MEETS EXPECTATIONS IF IT…): Writes a claim that establishes a controlling idea and identifies key points that support development Writes a draft introduction that sets an appropriate context for the claim. Writes in readable prose. 17

18 What Instruction? INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES Before students write their formal claim, review qualities of a strong claim as a class: must be an argument, include simple defense of the argument, and include categories to lead reader and organize essay. In pairs, students will edit sample claim statements provided by the teacher. As a class, go over each thesis statement, asking for volunteers to identify the strong and weak characteristics of each statement. After students have finished writing a formal claim, review the qualities of a strong opening paragraph: CAT- Context, Assertion, Two-point Thesis. In pairs, students share their claim statements and introduction. Student volunteers share their claim and Introduction with the class for critique. Extra Support – Provide students with sentence frames to help write the claim. 18

19 What Results? 19

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21 Scored Exemplars 21

22 Commentary 22

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