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5.2 Definite Integrals Greg Kelly, Hanford High School, Richland, Washington.

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1 5.2 Definite Integrals Greg Kelly, Hanford High School, Richland, Washington

2 When we find the area under a curve by adding rectangles, the answer is called a Rieman sum. subinterval partition The width of a rectangle is called a subinterval. The entire interval is called the partition. Subintervals do not all have to be the same size.

3 subinterval partition If the partition is denoted by P, then the length of the longest subinterval is called the norm of P and is denoted by. As gets smaller, the approximation for the area gets better. if P is a partition of the interval

4 is called the definite integral of over. If we use subintervals of equal length, then the length of a subinterval is: The definite integral is then given by:

5 Leibnitz introduced a simpler notation for the definite integral: Note that the very small change in x becomes dx.

6 Integration Symbol lower limit of integration upper limit of integration integrand variable of integration (dummy variable) It is called a dummy variable because the answer does not depend on the variable chosen.

7 We have the notation for integration, but we still need to learn how to evaluate the integral.

8 time velocity After 4 seconds, the object has gone 12 feet. In section 5.1, we considered an object moving at a constant rate of 3 ft/sec. Since rate. time = distance: If we draw a graph of the velocity, the distance that the object travels is equal to the area under the line.

9 If the velocity varies: Distance: ( C=0 since s=0 at t=0 ) After 4 seconds: The distance is still equal to the area under the curve! Notice that the area is a trapezoid.

10 What if: We could split the area under the curve into a lot of thin trapezoids, and each trapezoid would behave like the large one in the previous example. It seems reasonable that the distance will equal the area under the curve.

11 The area under the curve We can use anti-derivatives to find the area under a curve!

12 Lets look at it another way: Let area under the curve from a to x. ( a is a constant) Then:

13 min f max f The area of a rectangle drawn under the curve would be less than the actual area under the curve. The area of a rectangle drawn above the curve would be more than the actual area under the curve. h

14 As h gets smaller, min f and max f get closer together. This is the definition of derivative! Take the anti-derivative of both sides to find an explicit formula for area. initial value

15 As h gets smaller, min f and max f get closer together. Area under curve from a to x = antiderivative at x minus antiderivative at a.

16 Area

17 Area from x=0 to x=1 Example: Find the area under the curve from x = 1 to x = 2. Area from x=0 to x=2 Area under the curve from x = 1 to x = 2.

18 Example: Find the area under the curve from x = 1 to x = 2. To do the same problem on the TI-89: ENTER 7 2nd

19 Example: Find the area between the x-axis and the curve from to. On the TI-89: If you use the absolute value function, you dont need to find the roots. pos. neg.


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