Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

When the Emperor Was Divine Notes. When the Emperor Was Divine What do you remember about fatalism? Talk to a partner. 30 seconds. Fatalism is the belief.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "When the Emperor Was Divine Notes. When the Emperor Was Divine What do you remember about fatalism? Talk to a partner. 30 seconds. Fatalism is the belief."— Presentation transcript:

1 When the Emperor Was Divine Notes

2 When the Emperor Was Divine What do you remember about fatalism? Talk to a partner. 30 seconds. Fatalism is the belief that____________.

3 When the Emperor Was Divine Take out your book, When The Emperor Was Divine. Take out your two index cards with your themes (anonymity, Filial Piety, Erasure, Fatalism).

4 Shikata Ja Nai "it can't be helped" or "nothing can be done about it".

5 Motif Motifs: a repeated image or theme in a work of art. – Listen to Curtis Fuller – Picasso Blue Period

6 Shikata Ja Nai Motifs: 1.Anonymity (No names) 2.Erasure (objects disappearing) 3.Time (watches, clocks, references to time) 4.Antiquity (The ancient past, history)

7 Shikata Ja Nai (Fatalism)

8

9 Watch Incredible HD Footage of Tsunami

10 The Gleaners by Millet

11 When the Emperor Was Divine Take out your When the Emperor Was Divine notes.

12 Filial Piety Predict the meaning of this word. 30 seconds. Talk to a partner.

13 Filial Piety Filial = relating to son or daughter Piety = duty or respect Love and respect for ones parents; not be rebellious; show honor; display courtesy; ensure male heirs, uphold fraternity among brothers; wisely advise one's parents; conceal their mistakes; display sorrow for their sickness and death; and carry out sacrifices after their death.

14 Filial Piety Do you display filial piety for your parents and your ancestors? How? Talk to a partner and discuss. You have 1 minute.

15 Filial Piety Track moments of filial piety and page numbers.

16 Filial Piety Write down 4 daily actions of Filial Piety for you. Write down one BIG moment of Filial Piety you did for your parents.

17 Fatalism Predict the meaning of this term

18 Fatalism Write one moment of fatalism you went through. For example: – When the doctors told us that my grandmother had pancreatic cancer, I accepted it and did not fight it. Radiation and Chemotherapy were out of the question for me.

19 Fatalism is a belief that events are determined by fate. Fatalism is a belief that we have to accept the outcome of events, and that we cannot do anything that will change the outcome, because events are determined by something over which we have no control.

20 Fatalism People around school are talking trash about you. Here are your two options: 1.Fight back, telling EVERYBODY that will listen that the rumors are false. 2.Go with the flow, and just accept what is happening, and know that your true nature will be known.

21 Determinism Variables in life, outside of your will, determine your fate. Example: I am Asian, male, and of average weight and height. These variables determine who I am, what will happen to me. Based on these variables I will live to be 70. I will be good at math. I have a 49% chance of divorce. I make over 50,000 dollars a year.

22 Fatalism Do you believe in fatalism? Write examples of fatalism in novel and page number. Shikata Ja Nai It cant be helped.

23 Reading for a Purpose Write the following themes on one side of the index card. Track the page number and quote for examples of each theme. 1.Anonymity (No names, identity) 2.Erasure (objects and identity disappearing) 3.Filial piety 4.Fatalism (Its not meant to be…Vintrese Hodge)

24 Index Card Anonymity : Page 75: That evening she had lit a bonfire in the yard and burned all of the letters from Kagoshima.

25 Reading for a Purpose Use the post-it notes to find the following items in the book. Write the page number and quote supporting these themes. 1.Anonymity (No names, identity) 2.Erasure (objects and identity disappearing) 3.Filial piety 4.Fatalism

26 Writing Assignment How does displacement affect the following items for an individual displaced? 1.Anonymity (No names, identity) 2.Erasure (objects and identity disappearing) 3.Filial piety 4.Fatalism

27 Chapter 1 1.Take out When the Emperor Was Divine. 2.Turn to page 12, When the children came home… 3.Take out your index cards with the following themes: 1.Anonymity (No names, identity) 2.Erasure (objects and identity disappearing) 3.Filial piety 4.Fatalism

28 Chapter 1 1.Read up to page 22 (We started on 9). You have 20 minutes. 2.If you are already finished with chapter 1 (page 22), go ahead and read up to page 48. Quiz on chapter 2 will be next week. 3.As you read, look for the following themes: 1.Anonymity (No names, identity) 2.Erasure (objects and identity disappearing) 3.Filial piety 4.Fatalism (Ex: She was not one to follow the rules, but she followed the rules…P.9) 4.

29 Chapter 1 1.Read up to page 22 (We started on 9). If you are caught up, keep reading. (20 minutes) 2.Get back into your literary circles and share moments of the following examples in the book. Also, review what happened in the book for the quiz (12 Minutes): – Anonymity (No names, identity--Hint, look at page 28) – Erasure (objects and identity disappearing) – Filial piety – Fatalism (Ex: She was not one to follow the rules, but she followed the rules…P.9) Quiz will be given on the reading. Hint, look at page 28

30 Chapter 1 1.Get back into your literary circles and share moments of the following examples in the book. Also, review what happened in the book for the quiz (12 Minutes): – Anonymity (No names, identity--Hint, look at page 28) – Erasure (objects and identity disappearing) – Filial piety – Fatalism (Ex: She was not one to follow the rules, but she followed the rules…P.9) Quiz will be given on the reading.

31 Quiz 1.Take out a piece of paper.

32 Chapter 1 Quiz 1.What physical ailment did the dog have? 2.What did the woman eat before she killed the dog? 3.Where was the womans husband? 4.What did the boy ask from his sister during dinner?

33 Chapter 2 1.Read from 22 to… 2.Get back into your literary circles and share moments of the following examples in the book: – Anonymity (No names, identityHint, look at page 28) – Erasure (objects and identity disappearing) – Filial piety – Fatalism (Ex: She was not one to follow the rules, but she followed the rules…P.9) Quiz will be given on the reading.

34 Chapter 2 1.Take out your annotations and finish them. 2.Take out When the Emperor Was Divine.

35 Chapter 2 1.Take out When the Emperor Was Divine 2.Turn to page 31

36 Themes Intermittent : Occurring at irregular intervals; not steady Get into your literature circles. Discuss how intermittent relates to the following themes? I will call on your group for points. – Anonymity (No names, identityHint, look at page 28) – Erasure (objects and identity disappearing)

37 Chapter 2 1.Turn to page 24 2.Take out your index cards: – Anonymity (No names, identity--Hint, look at page 28) – Erasure (objects and identity disappearing) – Filial piety – Fatalism (Ex: She was not one to follow the rules, but she followed the rules…P.9)

38 Chapter 2 1.Read up to page 48 (We started on 23). If you are caught up, keep reading. (30 minutes) 2.Get back into your literary circles and share moments of the following examples in the book. Also, review what happened in the book for the quiz (12 Minutes): – Anonymity (No names, identity--Hint, look at page 28) – Erasure (objects and identity disappearing) – Filial piety – Fatalism (Ex: She was not one to follow the rules, but she followed the rules…P.9)

39 Chapter 2 Read page 49 – POV Whose POV? Close or distant 3 rd ? What the hell does 3 rd mean? – Anonymity theme How? Omniscience

40 Chapter 1 1.Get back into your literary circles. Complete the literature circle group work up to page Group leaders, come to the table to pick up the groups papers.

41 Chapter 2 1.READ to page 48 2.Share one instance of the following themes: – Anonymity (No names, identity--Hint, look at page 28) – Erasure (objects and identity disappearing) – Filial piety – Fatalism (Ex: She was not one to follow the rules, but she followed the rules…P.9)

42 Chapter 2 1.Page 33: What are items in your house that are specific to your ethnicity: 2.Work with a partner. You have 3 minutes.

43 Chapter 2 1.A man walking along side the tracks would just see a train with the windows passing by in the middle of the day (28) 1.33: Are you a rich man. Not anymore. --What happens to your identity when you lose your property? What are you without your house, your Sun or Luna or Casuela 2.Talk about the appropriation the JAs property. 3.40: She wrote the name down on the card and threw it out the window. 4.What is this emphasis on documentation, naming, remembering? How is this futile act meaningful to the girl? ANONYMITY THEMES MOTIFS

44 Chapter 3 1.Take out When the Emperor Was Divine 2.Turn to page 49

45 Chapter 3 1.Watch Mr. Kim act like a child. 2.Remember the definition of Displacement. 3.Watch the Afghan video 4.How can you use the word displaced with the Afghans?

46 Chapter 3 1.How does displacement affect the family? Address the following items: – Anonymity – Filial piety (Respect to parents, ancestors) – Fatalism (Ex: She was not one to follow the rules, but she followed the rules…P.9) 2.Get into your literature groups. 3.You MUST use examples from the book, with page numbers.

47 Examples: 1.USE ONE SHEET OF PAPER FOR THE WHOLE GROUP. 2.How does displacement affect the family? Address the following items: – Anonymity Displacement causes anonymity in the family because as you move away__________happens, as shown on page_____. – Filial piety (Respect to parents, ancestors) Displacement weakens filial piety within the family because ____________, as shown on page______. – Fatalism (Ex: She was not one to follow the rules, but she followed the rules…P.9) Displacement forces the family to rely more on fatalism because_____________, as shown on page______.

48 Examples: 1.Read up to page 105 by Monday (chapter 3). QUIZ! 2.After group work, start reading for the rest of the period.

49 Examples: 1.Take out your book, When the Emperor Was Divine. 2.Take out your index cards with examples of filial piety, anonymity, and fatalism. 3.Turn to page 53

50 Examples: 1.We are going to talk about how displacement affects the themes we reviewed yesterday. 2.Take out your note cards and copy these quotes down.

51 Examples: 1.Turn to page 61: Read together. 2.61: When stripped of cultural symbols of your heritage, what remains? 3.When you let the kite go, what theme is being revealed? 4.Whoa! What is this? In pairs, identify the themes this page demonstrates. You have 2 minutes.

52 Examples: 1.Turn to page 64: Read together. 64: Name is erased from the table 1.Whoa! What is this? In pairs, identify the theme this quote demonstrates. You have 2 minutes.

53 Examples: 1.Turn to page 70: Read together. REASONS FOR DISPLACEMENT 1.Whoa! What is this? In pairs, identify the theme this quote demonstrates. You have 2 minutes.

54 Examples: 1.Turn to page 75: Read together. 2.75: Stripped of family heirlooms, of objects of history, thrown into a flame. Here, the mother throws all of the relics of her heritage into a flame. 3.Whoa! What is this? In pairs, identify the theme this quote demonstrates. You have 2 minutes.

55 Examples: Turn to page 86: Read page together 86: Permanent loss again, losing the pearl earring. Or maybe she said, its just gone. Sometimes things disappear and theres no getting them back. Thats just how it is. 1.Whoa! What is this? In pairs, identify the theme this quote demonstrates. You have 2 minutes.

56 Writing: Take out a piece of a paper Write a scene in which you experienced one of the following themes: Anonymity, Filial piety, Fatalism. Use 3/5 senses. Turn in your paper in the back basket. QUIZ on Monday (Up to Page 105)

57 Chapter 3, (p ) 1.Get back into your literary circles. Complete the literature circle group work from page 49 to page Group leaders, come to the table to pick up the groups papers. 3.We are on DISCUSSION #3

58 Chapter 4: Take out When the Emperor Was Divine Turn to Page 106

59 Chapter 4: Page 106: Whose point of view are we in? 1.1 st, 2 nd or 3 rd ? (Hint: look up on your phones. Point of view, we.) You have 1 minute. Work with a partner.

60 Chapter 4: Page 106: Whose point of view are we in? 1.1 st, 2 nd or 3 rd ? (Hint: look up on your phones. Point of view, we.) FIRST PERSON PLURAL QUESTION: Why, as a writer, would you use first person plural? We were the class that rose to expectations. We did all we could to help others. We demolished all tests: SATs, CSTs, ACTs. Our grades transcended our past, reaching the soft underbellies of clouds. We were the best.

61 Chapter 4: Page 106: Whose point of view are we in? 1.1 st, 2 nd or 3 rd ? (Hint: look up on your phones. Point of view, we.) FIRST PERSON PLURAL Great for capturing a collective, a large group. Almost chant-like. The problem, though, is you lose intimacy. But you gain an entire group. Her second book uses this POV the whole book.

62 Chapter 4: Page 115: Now when we saw these people, they pretended not to see us. What theme/themes does this quote demonstrate? You have 2 minutes. Work with a partner.

63 Chapter 4: Grab a copy of When the Emperor Was Divine Read from page 116 to 139. (15 Minutes) Quiz on Chapter 4 on Monday.

64 Chapter 4: Page 120: We looked at ourselves in the mirror and did not like what we saw: black hair, yellow skin, slanted eyes. The cruel face of the enemy…We turned away from our reflection. What theme/themes does this quote demonstrate? You have 2 minutes. Work with a partner.

65 Notes Take notes for the Big-big essay.

66 Chapter 3 Identity: – Page 60: Tortoise Image (You will see this sucker in The Grapes of Wrath. Plagiarism? Or creative borrowing?) – How does this tortoise signify the experience of the characters? Symbols of identity: tag Symbol of Japanese: why not cat?

67 Chapter 3 Displacement and Identity: – Page 61: How does displacement affect cultural identity? The physical removal precedes a cultural and identity removal. Movement, displacement causes erasure.

68 Chapter 3 Displacement and Fear: – Page 70: Who is speaking? How is displacement feeding paranoia and fear? The Other

69 Chapter 3 Displacement and Identity: – Page 72: The most fundamental unit of human connection, the family, is disintegrated. Cannot remember the fathers face.

70 Chapter 3 Displacement and Identity: – Page 75: Cultural symbols are erased. At the largest unit of human connection, at the cultural level, identity gets erased. Burning of historical symbols, history in ashes, disappearing.

71 Essay Based on the evidence you collected on fatalism and filial piety, choose which topic you would like to write about. Based on the evidence, take a position on the following question. Does belief in fatalism or filial piety hurt or help you? Lets discuss!

72 Essay Turn in your hamburger/hotdog outline with two quotes.

73 Essay Take out a piece of paper. Label it Essay Scrapbook Take out my essay outline, Displacement Essay.

74 Essay Write a thesis statement using F.A.T.T.. Make sure you take a position. Write this on your essay scrapbook. Use Fatalism or Filial Piety. In the novel When the Emperor Was Divine, by Julie Otsuka fatalism is demonstrated as helping the characters cope with lifes difficulties, and I agree with this position. Turn in your thesis in the back tray.

75 Essay Write a thesis statement using F.A.T.T.. Make sure you take a position. Write it on the center diamond. (Fancier thesis) In the novel When the Emperor Was Divine, fatalism is shown as accepting ones destiny in the world, and by accepting ones fate, you are helped into a more peaceful way of life, which enables you to live a fuller life, one with truth and dignity.

76 Thesis Lets comment on these sample thesis statements: In the novel, When the Emperor Was Divine, by Julie Otsuka, she shows how a family is shredded by fatalism. This leads the family to feel helpless which hurts them, weakening the bonds between them.

77 Thesis In the novel, When the Emperor Was Divine, by Julie Otsuka, fatalism is expressed many times throughout the book. So what? What is missing? 1 minute: I will call on you.

78 Thesis Lets comment on these sample thesis statements: In the novel, When the Emperor Was Divine, by Julie Otsuka, fatalism makes us realize that the characters go through a lot without being able to change their destiny. The characters accept everything that comes to them, realizing nothing else could be done besides cooperating and continuing to try living their lives to their fullest abilities. So what? Whats missing from this thesis? You have 3 minutes. Ill call you.

79 Thesis Lets comment on these sample thesis statements: In the novel, When the Emperor Was Divine, by Julie Otsuka, fatalism makes us realize that the characters go through a lot without being able to change their destiny. The characters accept everything that comes to them, realizing nothing else could be done besides cooperating and continuing to try living their lives to their fullest abilities. Hint: What can you ARGUE in this thesis? You have 1 minute. Ill call you.

80 Thesis In the novel, When the Emperor Was Divine, by Julie Otsuka, fatalism is portrayed by a family accepting their destiny. When one accepts their fate given to them, they feel inner peace, nothing to fight or be distraught over, which allows one to live a complete life.

81 Thesis Switch your thesis with your partner.

82 Thesis Is it clear if your partner made a JUDGEMENT on filial piety or fatalism? Is fatalism good or bad according to their thesis? If not, help each other. I will call on you. You will read your partners thesis to the class! 3 minutes.

83 Thesis Get a piece of paper. Fold it hamburger hot dog. Write your thesis in the middle of your paper.

84 Thesis Find two quotes that support your thesis and write them down on your paper (see next slide).

85 Thesis Find two quotes that support your thesis and write them down on your paper (see next slide). Say-mean-matter the quotes to support your thesis, using power verbs and phrases.

86 Thesis: The Japanese were sent to the camps, and this act forced them to simply accept fate, which helped them live their lives with more poise Say: That was an easy one. You let the kite go. Mean: This quote is arguing that she didnt do nothing to keep the kite. (Who is she? If you didnt do nothing, doesnt that mean you do something? Watch the double negatives). Matter: By extension, fatalism is occurring at that moment. (So what? Are you proving your thesis? How does fatalism HELP this family?)

87 Thesis: The Japanese were sent to the camps, and this act forced them to simply accept fate, which helped them live their lives with more poise Say: That was an easy one. You let the kite go. Mean: This quote suggests that the mom accepted the fact that loss should be your fate. Matter: By extension, fatalism is occurring at that moment. In this case, by accepting this fact of losing an item or a treasure you become stronger.

88 Thesis: The Japanese were sent to the camps, and this act forced them to simply accept fate, which helped them live their lives with more poise Say: That was an easy one. You let the kite go. Mean: This quote is confirming that the mother put no effort into keeping the kite. Matter: By extension, fatalism is occurring at that moment. In this case, by just letting go of the kite, she was accepting her fate by letting go.

89 Hamburger Hotdog Paper Writers Name: Tommy Kim Quote #1 Say: She wondered why she had let it hang in the kitchen for so long. It bothered her, the way those peasants were forever bent over above that endless field of wheat. Look up she wanted to say to them. Look up, look up! The Gleaners, she decided, would have to go. She set the picture outside with the garbage. (8) Mean: This passage demonstrated the frustration and anger felt by the woman, making her realize how these peasants accepted their positions of poverty and hardship, which were so similar to her own position. She was being evicted from her house and sent to a concentration camp. By not accepting this fate, she is lit aflame with anger, which does nothing to change her position. Matter: In other words, she does not let fatalism create the peace that comes from acceptance of ones position, the dignity that arises from receiving life without futile resistance. If she had simply accepted her fate, received her hardship as a part of the design of her life, the events would be easier to accept. When the mountain crumples, one can hurl words of anger and injustice, which does nothing to stop the collapsing mountain, or one can embrace their loved ones and silently pray, in communion with a larger design greater than your anger. Quote #2 Say: Mean: Matter Reviewed By: Thesis: This type of fatalism is demonstrated throughout the novel When the Emperor Was Divine, and by accepting ones destiny in the world, by accepting ones fate, you are helped into a more peaceful way of life, which enables you to live a fuller life, one with truth and dignity

90 Hamburger Hotdog Paper Writers Name: Tommy Kim Rhetorical Question Introduction 1.First sentence grabs readers attention with rhetorical question. 2.Rest of introduction talks about the who, what, where of argument. 3.Downside: if the who-what-where is not nailed down, you can lose reader. Statement of Fact Introduction 1.Start introduction with a compelling fact. 2.Tone of introduction is factual, objective, and scientific. 3.Good for research papers 4.Downside: if facts are not compelling, the intro can be boring as hell. Scene Introduction 1.Use 3 out of the 5 senses 2.Quickest way to emotionally convince the reader 3.Pure storytelling 4.Mr. Kim is nuts about this one. But you should learn other techniques. 5.Downside: if the scene doesnt have a solid transition into thesis, the scene might seem irrelevant…huh? Ultimate Mash-up 1.Use 2 or 3 methods all at once! 2.Mr. Kims sample essay uses the mash- up. 3.Downside: Eh…not much. Rules are meant to be broken, especially in the artistic pursuit of writing! Sucka! Dont you think writing is noble? The fact is that writing requires 4 calories per minute. I smell the freshly sharpened pencils.

91 Essay - Introduction Take out a piece of paper. Label it, Rhetorical Question. Write an introduction using a rhetorical question.

92 Essay - Introduction Find the who-what-where of your thesis. Write these down. – WHO:The Japanese American Family – What: Fatalism (or Filial Piety) – Where: train, internment camp, house

93 Essay - Introduction Rhetorical Question Introduction 1.When all of your possessions are stripped from you, is it possible to sustain peace and acceptance? 2.How does an entire culture stay together, when racism and displacement encumber their every breath? 3.Is there a way of feeling at peace when all around you the world is collapsing? Mr. Kims who-what-where of his thesis. – WHO:The Japanese American Family – What: Fatalism – Where: train, internment camp, house

94 Essay - Introduction Rhetorical Question Introduction 1.Read your partners writing. 2.Is there, thing, stuff, anything, something, someone, anyone, in the writing? 3.Replace this thing with a more specific word.

95 Essay - Introduction Rhetorical Question Introduction When all of your possessions are stripped from you, is it possible to sustain peace and acceptance? The Japanese Americans (WHO) experience during World War II test this question. These American citizens bowed their heads and simply accepted what was dealt to them, a type of quiet fatalism (WHAT) that allowed them to survive the worst human rights violation in America during the 20 th century. The Japanese Americans were forcefully removed from their homes and sent to concentration camps (WHERE), where their beliefs in fatalism were tested to their fullest. Mr. Kims who-what-where of his thesis. – WHO:The Japanese American Family – What: Fatalism – Where: train, internment camp, house

96 Essay - Introduction Interesting Statement of Fact Introduction Here are some interesting facts you can start your essay with: Japanese-American internment was the relocation and internment by the United States government in 1942 of approximately 110,000 Japanese Americans and Japanese who lived along the Pacific coast of the United States to camps called "War Relocation Camps. President Franklin D. Roosevelt authorized the internment with Executive Order 9066, issued February 19, 1942, which allowed local military commanders to designate "military areas" as "exclusion zones," from which "any or all persons may be excluded." Mr. Kims who-what-where of his thesis. – WHO:The Japanese American Family – What: Fatalism – Where: train, internment camp, house

97 Essay - Introduction Interesting Statement of Fact Introduction Japanese-American internment was the relocation and internment by the United States government in 1942 of 110,000 Japanese Americans (WHO) and Japanese who lived along the Pacific coast of the United States to camps called "War Relocation Camps (WHERE). All government, including the supreme court, upheld this legal displacement of families. Some families came out of the experience stronger, their wills bent and tested, but bending back into shape because of their beliefs, one of which was fatalism (WHAT). Mr. Kims who-what-where of his thesis. – WHO:The Japanese American Family – What: Fatalism – Where: train, internment camp, house

98 Essay - Introduction On the back of your paper, label it Interesting statement of fact intro. Write an introduction using an interesting statement of fact.

99 Essay - Introduction Scene The family was in the waiting room of the hospital, and the sounds of the television and the conversation of nurses filled the room. It was the evening, and the harsh fluorescent light poured over our faces. My little cousin, who was raised by my grandmother, asked about treatments: chemotherapy, radiation, surgery. She refused to accept the news, and because of her refusal, she was flung into panic, despair and hopelessness. For me, I accepted my grandmothers fate, and at age 88, I felt like she had experienced enough to be at peace with her life. She had buried her own son and a grandson; we had gone on a vacation to Cabo San Lucas, and she ate an entire lobster; she had been to countless college graduations, including my own; she had cooked enough meals to nourish generations. She lived as full of a life as one could ask for, and I accepted the finality life had given her (WHAT). This type of fatalism is demonstrated throughout the novel, When the Emperor Was Divine, by a Japanese American Family (WHO) experiencing the internment camps (WHERE)., and by accepting ones destiny in the world, by accepting ones fate, you are helped into a more peaceful way of life, which enables you to live a fuller life, one with truth and dignity.

100 Essay - Introduction On a new sheet of paper, write a scene in your life that demonstrates filial piety or fatalism. You can mix and match, using all three methods if you want.

101 Introduction Writing can be reduced to a series of moves. Lets see what kind of moves Mr. Kim has!

102 13 Moves Take out the following materials to start your essay: 1.Hamburger/Hotdog outline 2.My sample essay, Acceptance of Fate 3.13 Moves list 4.Catalogue of Transitions

103 13 Moves Introducing the quote: In the book, When the Emperor was Divine, the boy explains what happens when his kite gets stuck on the concentration camp fence, And if your kite gets stuck on it? Thats easy, you let it go. This passage explains how a kite represents the idea of fatalism in play with the Japanese American family. In this case, we see how letting go is a form of fatalism, accepting your destiny as it unfolds before you without fighting and resisting. By fighting your fate, you bring chaos and unrest in your heart, and life becomes too difficult.

104 13 Moves Use the following list of moves to build your essay. Go! 1.Transition INTO thesis. 2.Thesis 3.Introduction to quote 4.Say #1 (quote) 5.Mean#1 6.Matter#1 7.Transition 8.Introduction to quote 9.Say #2 10.Mean#2 11.Matter#2 12.Transition into your conclusion 13.Restate thesis

105 Introduction Underline and number the following items: What type of introduction move did Mr. Kim make? 1.Transition INTO thesis. 2.Thesis

106 Introduction Underline and number the following items: What type of introduction move did Mr. Kim make? 3.Introduction to quote 4.Say #1 (quote) 5.Mean#1 6.Matter#1

107 Introduction Underline and number the following items: What type of introduction move did Mr. Kim make? 7.Transition from fighting fate into accepting her fate. 8.Introduction to quote 9.Say #2 10.Mean#2 11.Matter#2

108 Introduction Underline and number the following items: What type of introduction move did Mr. Kim make? 12. Transition from the topic of truth to peace. (Two very different topics that are joined in one sentence by a conjunction (and, but, however, although).

109 Essay Say-Mean-Matter 2 quotes in the book to prove the thesis. Use POWER VERBS!! Thesis: In the novel When the Emperor Was Divine, fatalism is shown as accepting ones destiny in the world, and by accepting ones fate, you are helped into a more peaceful way of life, which enables you to live a fuller life, one with truth and dignity. Say: She wondered why she had let it hang in the kitchen for so long. It bothered her, the way those peasants were forever bent over above that endless field of wheat. Look up she wanted to say to them. Look up, look up! The Gleaners, she decided, would have to go. She set the picture outside with the garbage. (8) Mean: This passage demonstrated the frustration and anger felt by the woman, making her realize how these peasants accepted their positions of poverty and hardship, which were so similar to her own position. She was being evicted from her house and sent to a concentration camp. By not accepting this fate, she is lit aflame with anger, which does nothing to change her position. Matter: In other words, she does not let fatalism create the peace that comes from acceptance of ones position, the dignity that arises from receiving life without futile resistance. If she had simply accepted her fate, received her hardship as a part of the design of her life, the events would be easier to accept. When the mountain crumples, one can hurl words of anger and injustice, which does nothing to stop the collapsing mountain, or one can embrace their loved ones and silently pray, in communion with a larger design greater than your anger.

110 When the Emperor Was Divine Essay Take out the following: Your rough draft of your When the Emperor Was Divine essay. Your List of moves. Your Catalogue of Transitions. The Hamburger/Hotdog outline

111 Essay - Introduction Choose an introduction: – Rhetorical Question – Interesting statement of fact – Scene

112 Move #1 (Transition into thesis) Transition from your rhetorical question/statement of fact/scene into your thesis. – In the same way that I experienced (summarize your scene), the characters in When the Emperor Was Divine, by Julie Otsuka also experienced filial piety/fatalism. – My experience mirrored what the Japanese American family went through in the novel, When the Emperor Was Divine, by Julie Otsuka.

113 Move #2 (Thesis) You got this, Sistah/Bro!

114 Move #3 (Second paragraph) Write a short introduction of the quote for paragraph #2. You need to provide context for the quote so it doesnt feel dropped in. You can steal the following. When the Emperor Was Divine had many moments in which (fatalism/filial piety) was on display. One such example was when _______________.

115 Move #4 (quote) Write down the quote. If the quote is less than three lines, use ____________ (Page number). If the quote is longer than three lines: – Double indent – No quotation marks – (provide page number)

116 Move #5 (mean) Use a power verb to summarize the quote: – This passage suggests how_______________. – Demonstrates – Implies – Explains – Depicts

117 Move #6 (matter) Use a power phrase to show how the quote matters to the thesis. Use one or two key words from your thesis: GIVE ME AT LEAST TWO SENTENCES! – In this case____________. – As a result_____________.

118 Move #7 and 8 (Transition from 1 st body to 2 nd body, AND introducing 2 nd quote.) Use a transition from body paragraph #1 to body paragraph #2 and introduce the quote at the same time. Another example of ___________ occurs when _______________. ***Can you see where move 7 and 8 are in this example?

119 Move #9 (quote) Write down the quote. If the quote is less than three lines, use ____________ (Page number). If the quote is longer than three lines: – Double indent – No quotation marks – (provide page number)

120 Move #10 (mean) Use a power verb to summarize the quote: – This passage suggests how_______________. – Demonstrates – Implies – Explains – Depicts

121 Move #11 (matter) Use a power phrase to show how the quote matters to the thesis. Use one or two key words from your thesis: GIVE ME AT LEAST TWO SENTENCES! – In this case____________. – As a result_____________.

122 Move #12 (Transition into conclusion) Choose a summary and emphasis transition.

123 Move #13 (Restatement of thesis) Restate your thesis, but imply it, using different wording. Below is an example you can use: – Whether (example from quote #1) or (example from quote #2), filial piety/fatalism affects us all.

124 Move #14 (Bring it back!) Revisit the scene from paragraph #1, extending it, using your evidence to create more depth for your scene. Use a comparison transition if you need it. Try to not use it and make it more natural.

125 Essay If you are not finished, continue working on your essay. If you are finished, give your essay to a partner, and have them grade it using my rubric. Staple your essay with your graders rubric and score sheet. Place these items, stapled, in the back.

126 Essay Turn in your draft in the back tray.

127 Essay-Paragraph #4 Transition from paragraph #3 into conclusion. Revisit the scene from paragraph #1, extending it, using your evidence to create more depth for your scene. Read Mr. Kims conclusion.


Download ppt "When the Emperor Was Divine Notes. When the Emperor Was Divine What do you remember about fatalism? Talk to a partner. 30 seconds. Fatalism is the belief."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google