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© Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc. When Gambling Takes Control of the Game (Periods 1 and 2) 24-Hour Problem Gambling Helplines Toll-Free and.

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Presentation on theme: "© Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc. When Gambling Takes Control of the Game (Periods 1 and 2) 24-Hour Problem Gambling Helplines Toll-Free and."— Presentation transcript:

1 © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc. When Gambling Takes Control of the Game (Periods 1 and 2) 24-Hour Problem Gambling Helplines Toll-Free and Confidential National Council on Problem Gambling, Inc Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc. 888-ADMIT-IT A collaborative program between the Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, National Collegiate Athletic Association and National Federation of High Schools

2 What is the definition of gambling? What is the legal age to gamble in the United States? What are the most popular forms of gambling that youth participate? Are there short and long-term consequences from gambling? © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Addendum to Problem Gambling Prevention Program for High School Students Establishing a baseline Period 1

3 Gambling and legal age © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Gambling is any time something of value is placed at risk in anticipation of winning something of greater value. The legal age to gamble varies throughout the United States, ranging either from 18 to 21 years of age.

4 Popular forms of gambling among youth The most popular forms of gambling among youth include: Sports betting Cards (e.g. Texas Hold’em poker) Games of skill Lottery games Internet © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Addendum to Problem Gambling Prevention Program for High School Students

5 Short and long-term consequences of gambling © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Gambling is not a risk-free activity. Young people and adults do become addicted to gambling, resulting in short and long-term consequences, similar to alcohol and drug abuse. Problem gambling is considered a “hidden” illness because there are no visible or tell-tale signs such as stumbling when walking, slurred speech, or bloodshot eyes. In addition to physical and emotional difficulties, and hardships at school and work, problem gamblers are more likely than alcohol or substance abusers to encounter serious financial and legal issues, as well as to consider or attempt suicide as a way out.

6 What is the definition of competition? What is positive and negative competition? © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Addendum to Problem Gambling Prevention Program for High School Students Competition

7 The term competition is typically used when referring to two or more forces seeking to attain the same goal or outcome. It is also important to acknowledge that a student-athlete may compete against him or herself in an effort to improve upon a past performance. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007

8 Positive and Negative Competition Frameworks COMPETITION Positive FrameworkNegative Framework Encourages people to do betterThrives on putting others down Enables a person to gain confidenceDestroys a will to learn and improve Fosters commitmentDepends on outside/material motivators Directs and builds upon inner focus and drive Tries to control or dominate others Appreciates a good performance by self or others Undermines a performance by self or others Builds relationships and teamworkCreates barriers and divisiveness Promotes self-esteemDefeats self-esteem © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Addendum to Problem Gambling Prevention Program for High School Students

9 Finding healthy terrain Negative competition is always destructive, ego- driven and selfish. Positive competition is not concerned with individual personalities or dynamics between people but is a driving force within each person striving to attain a personal or mutual goal or objective. Healthy competition promotes a person’s self- esteem and recognizes that one’s self-worth is not dependent on winning. Often the greatest learning experiences stem from losing. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007

10 Competition and gambling Are the terms “competition” and “gambling” synonymous or different? © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Addendum to Problem Gambling Prevention Program for High School Students

11 The difference between competition and gambling Positive competition is the act of being self-motivated toward a purpose or goal. It is a driving force within a person, as outlined in Positive Framework. Competition does not need to be dependent upon outside motivating factors or for reasons delineated under the Negative Framework. Gambling always involves placing something of value at risk in anticipation of winning something of greater value. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007

12 Article Review Read “Silman gets 46 months for his part in ASU point-shaving scandal”. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Addendum to Problem Gambling Prevention Program for High School Students

13 Article Definitions What do the following terms mean? Bookie Point-shaving Point spread Sports bribery Sports pools Fantasy leagues © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007

14 The Meanings (1 of 4) Bookie – A person who takes illegal bets. Most times, a bettor’s action is on credit with a bookie and such betting is illegal in the United States. Point-shaving – Is when the favorite team wins by more points than favored or when the underdog loses by fewer points than predicted. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Addendum to Problem Gambling Prevention Program for High School Students

15 The Meanings (2 of 4) Point spread – Used to even the odds of a particular sporting event. Each team has points either added or subtracted from its score to equalize the chances of winning in a wager on a competition. Sports bribery – Usually in the form of money or favors offered or given to an athlete in a position of trust for purposes of influencing their views or performance. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007

16 The Meanings (3 of 4) Sports pools – An organized form of sports wagering where the participants in the pool each put in money to wager on the outcome of a large number of games. The most common form of a sports pool is wagering on the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament, or March Madness. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007

17 The Meanings (4 of 4) Fantasy leagues – A game where fantasy owners build a team that competes against other fantasy owners based on the statistics generated by individual players or teams of a professional sport. Under a technical definition of gambling, fantasy leagues are a form of wagering when individual participants must pay an entry fee in order to receive a prize at the end of the competition. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007

18 Status “Hedake” Smith was sentenced to one year in prison, three years probation and paid an $8,000 fine. Silman, the bookie, was sentenced to 46 months in prison, a 500-hour drug program and counseling for his gambling addiction. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Addendum to Problem Gambling Prevention Program for High School Students

19 Was any person or organization hurt beyond these students? If yes, identify. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Who else was hurt? (1 of 2)

20 Who else was hurt? (2 of 2) Beyond the students, the following were some others hurt by the incident: Investment advisor Basketball team School Student friends and families NCAA Collegiate basketball © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Addendum to Problem Gambling Prevention Program for High School Students

21 Was anyone else affected? (1 of 2) Was any other person or entity affected in any way? If yes, identify. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Period 2

22 Was anyone else affected? (2 of 2) Additional persons or entities affected included: Law enforcement Courts Fans Other © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Addendum to Problem Gambling Prevention Program for High School Students

23 Other sports betting scandals Northwestern University – Four players shaved points in three of their Big 10 Conference games. University of Florida – A Florida student-athlete was banned from playing basketball during his senior year upon learning that he may have violated NCAA bylaws by gambling on college and professional sports games. Boston College – Thirteen members of the football team were suspended for betting on college sports, three of whom bet on their own team. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007

24 NCAA “Don’t Bet on It” program NCAA instituted “Don’t Bet on It” program. For college and high school administrators, coaches, educators and student-athletes. The purpose is to: Increase awareness about the risks and consequences of gambling. Outline strict NCAA rules and regulations relating to gambling. Sports gambling is strictly prohibited by the NCAA and is grounds for ineligibility and lifelong termination from playing at an NCAA school. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Addendum to Problem Gambling Prevention Program for High School Students

25 NCAA survey of student-athletes In 2003, NCCA issued its first study of gambling and associated behaviors among student-athletes. Information was requested from 2,003 teams at 1,032 NCAA institutions. 20,739 valid surveys; 60.8% males and 37.3% females. If one extends the percentages from the survey to the total student-athlete population, it was estimated that nearly 80,000 student-athletes engaged in some type of sports wagering activities in the year prior to the administration of the survey. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007

26 Prevalence State and national studies have confirmed that sports betting is among the top forms of gambling presenting the greatest risks to adolescents and adults. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Addendum to Problem Gambling Prevention Program for High School Students

27 Be on the alert (1 of 2) All students should be on the alert for people promising unrealistic expectations, as well as those who present favors or offers that seem difficult to refuse. The saying, “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is,” should serve as a warning sign when examining or evaluating comments or situations presented. Promises of a car or other lavish gifts, easy access to money, alcohol or drugs should serve as a red flag, as should inquiries about player injuries. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007

28 Be on the alert (2 of 2) Be aware that because student-athletes are typically competitive in nature, upon later in life when they no longer are playing their sport of choice, they can become vulnerable to gambling problems as a means of filling a void or substituting one form of action for another. This is a very important point and is outlined as a cautionary note. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007

29 Approaches to overtures (1 of 2) What are some approaches student-athletes can use in response to bookies or other overtures or offers from similar types to engage in gambling related activities? © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Addendum to Problem Gambling Prevention Program for High School Students

30 Approaches to overtures (2 of 2) Just walk away. Do not entertain the dialogue or be associated with such negative influences. Report to officials without delay. School Athletic Director Coach Other Administrators NCAA Law enforcement authorities Immediately notify parents or guardian of experience. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007

31 Warning signs of a gambling problem (1 of 2) Borrow money from friends, family members, teammates, coaches, or others Appear quick to sell possessions or concoct emergencies as a means of obtaining cash Inability to focus on school work or athletic performance Jeopardize relationships with friends, teammates, family members and others Fail to follow through on promises Appear moody without warning Intense when watching sporting events Broke one day and have cash on hand another Believe gambling is a fast and easy way to make money © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Addendum to Problem Gambling Prevention Program for High School Students

32 Gamble with money set aside for something else Take on extra work to have gambling money Skip school or work to gamble Gamble to escape from problems, worries or difficulties Drop in grades Lose track of time and bet more than planned when gambling Argue with family or friends about gambling Become secretive Commit an illegal activity to cover bets or losses Unable to cut back or stop gambling © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Addendum to Problem Gambling Prevention Program for High School Students If you or someone you know experience one or more signs, gambling may be a problem. Warning signs of a gambling problem (2 of 2)

33  SAFE Coordinators/School Counselors  Coaches  National Council on Problem Gambling (NCPG):  Web site: 24-Hour Helpline: (will link to closest affiliate)  Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling (FCCG)  Web site:  24-Hour HelpLine: 888-ADMIT-IT ( )  Click on “Help for Youth”  National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)  Web site:  Office: © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Resources

34 24-Hour Helplines: National Council – Florida Council – 888-ADMIT-IT ( ) The first step to getting help for a gambling problem is admitting there is one. The National Council on Compulsive Gambling operates a national hotline and specialists are available 24-hours a day. The Helpline provides crisis supports, information and resources for assistance. The NCPG Helpline will link callers to the closest affiliate council. The FCCG is also provided as the author of this program and as another point of contact. All Helpline calls are free, confidential and anonymous so personal information is not required. Don’t try to handle a gambling problem alone. Call the NCPG or FCCG helplines for information, support and assistance. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Addendum to Problem Gambling Prevention Program for High School Students

35 Summary (1 of 3) Healthy competition promotes a person’s self-esteem and recognizes that one’s self-worth is not dependent on winning. Positive competition, unlike gambling, does not require something of value be placed at risk, pending the outcome of a challenge. Taking the high road will positively affect your future, versus a path that appears quick and painless on the surface. Swift decision-making is not a rational approach for reaching important choices about one’s direction or future. Instead, vital decisions need to take into account short and long-term benefits and impacts. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007

36 Summary (2 of 3) One lapse in judgment can have permanent and lifelong impacts on individuals and organizations. One person’s action can compromise the integrity of a sport. Regardless of the legal gambling age, many students are participating in various forms of wagering, some of whom are experiencing serious to severe difficulties. National and state studies have found that sports betting is among the top three forms of gambling presenting the greatest risk to young people and adults. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007 Addendum to Problem Gambling Prevention Program for High School Students

37 Summary (3 of 3) Sports gambling among student-athletes is strictly prohibited by the NCAA. People with negative intentions are always looking to bring others down – resist overtures. Look for signs of a gambling problem, take steps to aid a teammate or other person in trouble, and when appropriate report to necessary authorities. Use the National Council on Problem Gambling, as well as the Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling web sites and helplines to access information and confidential and anonymous assistance. Visit the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) web site for information and background on gambling and problem gambling among student athletes. © Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling, Inc., 2007


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