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Harvard Medical School MENTORING: A Crisis in Surgical Education Christopher C. Baker, M.D. Isidore Cohn, Jr. Professor of Surgery Chair, Department of.

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Presentation on theme: "Harvard Medical School MENTORING: A Crisis in Surgical Education Christopher C. Baker, M.D. Isidore Cohn, Jr. Professor of Surgery Chair, Department of."— Presentation transcript:

1 Harvard Medical School MENTORING: A Crisis in Surgical Education Christopher C. Baker, M.D. Isidore Cohn, Jr. Professor of Surgery Chair, Department of Surgery LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans, LA

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3 MENTORSHIP OUTLINE Characteristics of good mentors Current educational challenges Strategies and solutions Lessons from 30 years in academic surgery

4 Mentor Trusted friend and advisor to Ulysses.

5 Characteristics of a Good Mentor

6 Wise and fair Patient and constructive Objective and tough (as needed) William J. Baker, MD ( )

7 Able to set goals & ensure success for mentees Altruistic-puts trainee’s needs ahead of one’s own George F. Sheldon, MD, FACS

8 Flexible and caring Available and enthusiastic Surgical Nurse UNC, 2003

9 You Find Mentors in Unexpected Places Master Jewell Allen Sixth Degree Black Belt

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11 Roles of a Mentor Teacher Counselor Coach Trainer Role Model Sponsor Advisor

12 Priorities for Mentors Be patient and flexible. Give constructive feedback. Be readily available to mentees. Be a good role model. Maintain your self-awareness Don’t neglect your own career development.

13 Professionalism for Residents Avoid dishonesty in all forms. Get out of bed, see the patient, & document it. Take care of paperwork in a timely fashion. Be on time for cases, clinic, & conferences. Avoid conflict in the chart & in public arenas.

14 Maintain Resident Esprit de Corps LSU—December, 2009

15 Educational Challenges Duty hours restrictions Information overload Trainee debt obligations Measures of competency Government regulations

16 Impact of Duty Hours Lack of continuity of care Ineffective hand-offs at change of shift Ownership of patients by residents Development of “shift mentality” Erosion of the team concept

17 Impact of Duty Hours Interferes with ability to follow a disease process in a longitudinal fashion Reduces consistent interactions between residents and attending staff Decreases opportunities for mentoring Lowers chances to model professionalism

18 Educational Strategies Stress independent life-long learning. Disease-centered approaches to patients Encourage multi-disciplinary collaboration. Promote effective mentoring.

19 Educational Solutions Offer training in simulation centers Encourage flexibility Emphasize problem-solving skills Promote autonomy in decision-making

20 “If you keep practicing a mistake, you’ll get really good – at the mistake.” - Benjamin Pang Jeng Lo T’ai Chi Ch’uan Master

21 Challenges in Mentoring Balancing nurturing and toughness Career guidance for senior residents Mentoring junior faculty Providing mentorship for future leaders

22 When faced by challenges, Sometimes you just have to… JUMP IN !

23 Lake Winnepesaukee, NH

24 “There are some things about swinging a cat by the tail that you can learn ONLY by swinging a cat by the tail.” - Mark Twain

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26 Lessons I’ve learned from 30 years in Academic Surgery

27 TREASURE YOUR COLLEAGUES

28 NC Trauma Directors Chapel Hill, 6/2004

29 Samir Fakhry, M. D. Former Partner & Long-time Friend

30 NURTURE YOUR FAMILIES

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32 DEVELOP AN AVOCATION

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34 Maintain Balance in Your Personal& Professional Life

35 Conclusions Good mentors are key for training residents. Pay it forward. Today’s trainees are tomorrow’s mentors. Mentorship is a life-long journey.


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