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Copyright 2011 KenCrest Services. Culture Competence is a set of behaviors, attitudes and policies that come together in a system, agency or among professionals.

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Presentation on theme: "Copyright 2011 KenCrest Services. Culture Competence is a set of behaviors, attitudes and policies that come together in a system, agency or among professionals."— Presentation transcript:

1 Copyright 2011 KenCrest Services

2 Culture Competence is a set of behaviors, attitudes and policies that come together in a system, agency or among professionals and enable that system, agency or those professionals to work effectively in cross- cultural situations. Culture is used because it implies the integrated pattern of human behavior that includes thoughts, communications, actions, customs, beliefs, values and institutions of a racial, ethnic, religious or social group. Towards A Culturally Competent System of Care CASSP Technical Assistance Center Georgetown University Child Development What is Culture Competence ?

3 Copyright 2011 KenCrest Services The term culture competence means services, supports or other assistance that are conducted in a manner that is responsive to the beliefs, interpersonal styles, attitudes, language and behaviors of individuals who are receiving services, and in a manner that has the greatest likelihood of ensuring their maximum participation in the program. Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act 1994 What is Culture Competence? What is Culture Competence?

4 Copyright 2011 KenCrest Services Culture is the fundamental building block of identity Through cultural learning, children gain a feeling of belonging, a sense of personal history and a security in knowing………….. who they are and where they come from. Essential Connections Essential Connections A childs family background shapes early cultural experiences. Families hand down beliefs, attitudes and ways of acting. These rules of living come from ones ethnic, regional and religious heritage. Although the many cultures of the world evolve and change over time, each one of us passes down to its children recognizable and meaningful rules for living.

5 Copyright 2011 KenCrest Services Families vary tremendously in how closely they follow cultural rules. By exploring your own background, you can see the roots of some of your child care practices. No matter what routines you are carrying out, your values about it are deeply rooted in your childhood and other cultural influences. Essential Connections Essential Connections The caregiver has to understand his or her own culture-what it is from a conceptual standpoint, but also from a practical sense. What about me is in fact influenced by my culture? Carol Brunson Phillips

6 Copyright 2011 KenCrest Services Think about your own family. Are cultural and/or family traditions passed on from your parents? Grandparents? Siblings? How is your family culture/traditions evident in everyday activities? Holidays? Special events (weddings, parties, funerals). Exercise

7 Copyright 2011 KenCrest Services Conducted or provided in a manner that shows awareness of and is responsive to the beliefs, interpersonal styles, attitudes, language and behavior of children and families who are referred for receiving services. (PL , Title 55, section ). Cultural Competency in Early Intervention The Commonwealth of Pennsylvanias early intervention regulations defines cultural competent service delivery as follows:

8 Copyright 2011 KenCrest Services Value your own culture Understand the impact of culture on how one views and acts in the world Request and use information from others to understand who they are and how they would like to be treated. Locate resources in the community to support work with families. Work collaboratively/effectively with others across cultures. Skills in Cultural Competence

9 Copyright 2011 KenCrest Services Take time to make small talk and find common interest. Proceed at a pace that is comfortable for the family. Pay attention to visual cues from body language and facial expressions. Ask direct questions about the pace. Encourage families to ask questions. Show respect for families. Skills in Working in Families of ANY Culture

10 Copyright 2011 KenCrest Services Simplified perceptions, opinions or beliefs regarding a person or group of people. Stereotypes are based on assumptions and lack of experience with a particular group of people. Our beliefs have an impact on how we treat people. Examine the stereotypes that you have toward a particular group of people. Stereotypes

11 Copyright 2011 KenCrest Services Think about an instance when someone made a culturally stereotypical assumption about you. How did you feel? How did you respond? Record your answer on the answer sheet. Think about a situation in which you made a stereotypical assumption about someone else. What happened? How did this person respond? What did you learn from the experience? Record your answer on the answer sheet. Exercise

12 Copyright 2011 KenCrest Services Knowing who we are helps us to know others better Who we are is not based on economic and ethnic backgrounds, but also on temperament, experience, and the complex interaction of many factors that contribute to a unique individual Key Points Key Points

13 Copyright 2011 KenCrest Services Diversity is more than cultural differences. Each of us is similar and different on an infinite number of dimensions. Diversity extends far beyond the dimensions of race and gender. In order to value diversity and make it part of your culture, you need to appreciate and respect the great variety of factors that make us a diverse society. What is Diversity?

14 Copyright 2011 KenCrest Services Culture Ethnicity Race Socioeconomic status Gender Sexual Orientation Religion Education Political Affiliation Language Personal characteristics How is Diversity Expressed?

15 Copyright 2011 KenCrest Services Review the handout entitled Some Points To Remember About Cross-cultural RelationshipsSome Points To Remember About Cross-cultural Relationships Review the handout entitled The Village of 100 People The Village of 100 People Did any information in this hand-out surprise you? Exercise

16 Copyright 2011 KenCrest Services Every person, in different ways, is like all other persons, like some other persons, and like no other persons. C. Kluckhohn & H. A. Murray

17 Copyright 2011 KenCrest Services Learn about the familys culture Understand the familys perspective Develop trust and friendship Be willing to listen Recognize that a familys cultural values may be different from your own Gather information about the familys culture, background, and priorities for their child Follow the familys lead Collaborative relationships are built on trust, mutual respect and shared goals Building relationship requires time, effort, and communication Key Points

18 Copyright 2011 KenCrest Services Please click here to download the completion documents for this training module; the instructions are as follows:click here to download the completion documents Download and print the file. Complete the Cultural Diversity Quiz and return to your program coordinator. Fill in the Sign In Sheet and return to your program coordinator for signature. Add your name to the Certificate of Completion and ask your program coordinator to sign, verifying your completion of the training module. Keep the original certificate for your records for tracking of your annual 24 hours of mandated training. Thank you for completing this online training module.


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