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A Guide To The Perplexed: Residency Advice. Residency Advice First And Second Year.

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Presentation on theme: "A Guide To The Perplexed: Residency Advice. Residency Advice First And Second Year."— Presentation transcript:

1 A Guide To The Perplexed: Residency Advice

2 Residency Advice First And Second Year

3 You’ve Been Screened, Interviewed…. And Admitted To Medical School WOW! WOW! Now You Start To Worry Already About Residency? Obsessive-compulsives!

4 Planning Is Different From Anything You’ve Done Before Each residency will want to hire the best doctors they can get for their specialty. You’ll be working as a doctor to learn to be a better doctor: it is both a job and an education. So it will be, in the round of residency competition, more than your potential as a doctor that’s important (as it was for med school admission). From now on, you will be judged by your proven track record as a student-doctor. So it will be, in the round of residency competition, more than your potential as a doctor that’s important (as it was for med school admission). From now on, you will be judged by your proven track record as a student-doctor.

5 The Basic Sciences The Essential Thing 1)Pre-clinical academic performance is important, not just as 'grades and scores', but because… 2)Excellence in your clinical years will depend on how well you’ve learned the lessons and discipline of your pre-clinical years. The more you know of medical science, and of scientific logic and method, the better doctor you are likely to be in both your clinical and investigative skills.

6 M1 and M2 Years Your performance on examinations (‘numbers’) is more emphasized by some specialties than others…but no specialty wants to take a person who has trouble passing exams, if only because such a person can’t get licensed to practice. Your performance on examinations (‘numbers’) is more emphasized by some specialties than others…but no specialty wants to take a person who has trouble passing exams, if only because such a person can’t get licensed to practice. Some specialties want you also to have evidenced commitment to advancing the art by clinical or bench research (more about this later). Some specialties want you also to have evidenced commitment to advancing the art by clinical or bench research (more about this later).

7 COMMENTS FROM THE DEANS USMLE STEP I and II Exam Scores? How Important Are They? USMLE STEP I and II Exam Scores? How Important Are They? From Dr. Kumari (2005): I surveyed UCD residency directors about the value they put on USMLE examination scores in assessing applicants for residencies in their disciplines. The responses are in each specialty section’s program director slides. Keep in mind that these are our school’s perceptions only, though they are likely to reflect those of program directors within the same specialty at other programs. However, expect differences in opinion based on the specific program director and resident selection committee’s experience, competition between programs, prestige, geographic appeal, nature of the program’s patient population and perceived mission (clinical, research, e.g.), etc.

8 Comments From The Deans USMLE Board Scores DEAN MICHAEL WILKES (2005): Step 1 has added importance at a pass-fail school such as ours. It seems that for most non-surgery programs, the USMLE score is not vital – but it must be passed (solidly!). Students that barely pass, program directors worry, may have difficulty also with specialty exams in the future, causing trouble for the program. Most program directors will not feel a 205 score is much worse than a 225 (everything else being equal), and will value other items much more (clerkship evaluations, letters of recommendation, etc.) Most program directors will not feel a 205 score is much worse than a 225 (everything else being equal), and will value other items much more (clerkship evaluations, letters of recommendation, etc.) Surgical specialties and subspecialties often place a high value on test scores, however. Surgical specialties and subspecialties often place a high value on test scores, however.

9 The Other Essential Thing ! ALL specialties will want candidates who are responsible, mature, hard working, caring, honest, curious, professional and collegial, and who can work well with staff, peers, students, nurses, supervisors, patients and families. ALL specialties will want candidates who are responsible, mature, hard working, caring, honest, curious, professional and collegial, and who can work well with staff, peers, students, nurses, supervisors, patients and families. Bad behavior will be seen as a sign of flawed character, no matter when it occurs. Bad behavior will be seen as a sign of flawed character, no matter when it occurs.

10 How Do You Choose? Some of the preclinical students know already what they want to do. Most don’t. Many who ‘know’ will change their minds. To choose a specialty without having real experience in it is like marrying a mail-order spouse.

11 What Are The ‘Best’ Specialties? The best specialty for any doctor is the one they love best and in which they do their best. No specialty is intrinsically better than another. The ‘life-style’ of any specialty can change abruptly by political, economic or societal whim: choose for content, not structure.

12 Coming To Your M3 Year?* How important are your evaluations during M3 clerkships? Generally critical! You may overcome a lackluster pre-clinical record by being a clinical star, but even the top pre- clinical record will not do you much good if you are a clinical disaster in any clerkship *There will be a class meeting about the M3 year before you have to do anything about it.

13 The M3 Year No matter what your fellow medical students (i.e. the “they” of “they say…”) tell you… The order of your M3 clerkships makes very little difference. What makes a big difference is how well you do in each compared to the students who are ‘in it’ at the same time you are. * *Doing clerkship X first will compare you to others doing clerkship X first – second with second, and so on. So putting one off so you’ll be ‘more experienced’ when you take it just has you evaluated relative to others who now also are experienced…see?

14 “I Hear The Evaluations Are Subjective!” Sure they are. There are no ‘objective’ ways to assess responsibility, dedication, character, inter-personal skills, interest, aptitude, teamwork, maturity and judgment.

15 They Say That Personality Conflicts With Evaluators Can Ruin Your Grade If you believe there is a significant personality conflict that might lead to an unfair assessment, it is your responsibility to discuss this with the instructor of record as soon as you become aware of it.

16 ARE THE ‘SHELF EXAM’* SCORES IMPORTANT? They sure are… these are USMLE board type ‘tests’ of the clinical knowledge you should have after each clerkship. Since they are tests, you must study for them during your clerkship! You may not, however, spend so much time in study for tests that you neglect your clinical assignments. You must do well in both! *Either knowledge without skills, or skills without knowledge, make you dangerous……..not a doctor!

17 Coming To Your M4 Year* There are no ‘tricks’ of working the match system that will advantage you in applying to residency. Program directors in all specialties are too experienced and devoted to their programs to fall for non-substantive attempts to ‘game’ the match. The order of your senior clerkships, however, will potentially make a difference both to you and to the programs you apply to. *There will be a class meeting about your M4 year before you have to do anything about it.

18 Coming To Your Senior Year You should seek advice from a faculty member in the specialty you wish as to the content and order of your senior year. It is generally wise to take at least one acting internship in your chosen specialty and at least one (if you can) at the program to which you want to match…before November of your senior year. This gives time for evaluators to write letters for you.

19 Your Senior Year Your Senior Year You will need letters of recommendation from faculty who have worked with you clinically in your chosen specialty (how many letters will vary by program – so check with them, and send no more and no less than they ask for).

20 What About The Dean’s Letter ? This will contain information about both your pre- clinical and clinical achievements. It will be honest, and cannot be selectively expurgated of unfavorable comments if it is to remain credible. Generally, the dean’s letter-writer will not quote an unfavorable comment unless it is either about egregious lack of professionalism or is part of a theme (i.e. is commented upon by more than one independent evaluator). The deans want to get you the best residency possible, but cannot lie about or obscure your record.

21 How About Interviews? You should schedule time in your senior year for interviews at the programs in which you are interested. Do not schedule time for interviews concurrent with a clerkship and expect to be released from your duties to go. This will be seen as unreliability to your clinical responsibilities in order to advantage yourself- Bad, Bad!

22 How About AOA? Isn’t That Important? The only way to “get into AOA”, the National Medical Honor Society, is to be an exceptional student and superb doctor. There are no other ways to ‘apply’.

23 Criteria For Election To AOA Scholastic achievement should be the primary but not sole basis for election of a student. Leadership capabilities, ethical standards, fairness in dealing with colleagues, potential for achievement in medicine, and a record of service to the school and community. To be eligible, one must be in top 25% of the class, but eligibility is not election. The full qualities of each eligible candidate are carefully considered by AOA members, who are students, residents, & faculty

24 AOA And Residency AOA election is not intended by the society to be a device to enhance one’s candidacy for residency. A candidate’s ‘motive’ for desired election to AOA is immaterial. It is the totality of a candidate’s accomplishments in scholarship, leadership, service, and character which is determinative.

25 “ Worthy To Serve The Suffering ” * “ Worthy To Serve The Suffering ” * AOA membership is an honor, but it is primarily an obligation and a life-long promise. AOA membership is an honor, but it is primarily an obligation and a life-long promise. *WHAT THE INITIALS IN GREEK ( ΆΏΆ ) STAND FOR. ELECTION OF STUDENT MEMBERS OCCURS AT THE END OF THE THIRD YEAR AND IN THE FIRST HALF OF THE 4 TH YEAR OF MEDICAL SCHOOL.

26 Specific Residencies AnesthesiologyDermatology Emergency Medicine ENT Family Practice MedicineNeurologyNeurosurgery Nuclear Medicine Ob-GynOphthalmologyOrthopaedicsPathologyPediatrics Plastic Surgery Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Psychiatry Public Health Radiation Oncology RadiologySurgeryUrology BUT WHAT IF YOU DON’T KNOW YET?

27 So You Don’t Know Yet?* Start by honestly assessing your own gifts and limitations. In what specialty during the 3 rd year did you most enjoy the people with whom you worked, both colleagues and patients? Think about what you don’t want to do, and eliminate those careers. Try several likable possibilites as clerkships early in your senior year. Talk to your clinical advisor, a trusted teacher, your college director, and people already in the fields you’re considering. *You are not in the minority here: many medical Students don’t know by their senior year!

28 Specific Residencies AnesthesiologyDermatology Emergency Medicine ENT Family Practice MedicineNeurologyNeurosurgery Nuclear Medicine Ob-gynOphthalmologyOrthopaedicsPathologyPediatrics Plastic Surgery Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Psychiatry Public Health Radiation Oncology RadiologySurgeryUrology EXPLORE THE POSSIBILITIES!

29 So You Want To Be An Anesthesiologist? ADVICE FROM PROGRAM DIRECTOR ADVICE FROM PROGRAM DIRECTOR  We interview applicants in upper quartile of USMLE – Step 1 is important as basic sciences particularly physiology, biochemistry and pharmacology are the foundations of anesthesiology practice. A poor score in Step 1 can be negated by improved USMLE step 2 or strong advocacy from faculty adviser.  ALL positions fill in California. Open positions in south and northeast regions fill during post-match scramble  There is no early match.  The majority of positions are at the PGY2 level. There are a small number of categorical PGY1 positions nationally. Most applicants will need to consider participating in match for PGY1 transitional internships in addition to PGY2 position in anesthesiology.  Research is highly desirable in related research area.  Grades/USMLE important but not supreme. Clerkships (electives) indicate their idea of the important core medical disciplines relevant to the practice of anesthesiology. Their facility in discussing experiences during clerkships and medical school indicate self reflective and communication skills. Strong advocacy from faculty adviser(s) as to clinical performance and character on clerkships. Personal statement not as important as ability to discuss their life and learning experiences, influences and personal values. Some sense of who they are, what they are looking for from residency; I.E., the impressions gained during the interview day is the deal breaker/maker.  CONTACT: Peter G. Moore, MD, PhD (chair and program director)  PHONE# 

30 So You Want To Be A Dermatologist? ADVICE FROM PROGRAM DIRECTOR Preferential consideration is given to candidates with USMLE I scores above 235. Grades during 3 rd year clerkships and AOA status are given particular attention. Preferential consideration is given to candidates with USMLE I scores above 235. Grades during 3 rd year clerkships and AOA status are given particular attention. There are limited positions nationwide. There is no early match. There is no PGY II match. Research is highly desirable but not required. Students should seek advice from faculty beginning in their M1 and M2 year. Our program seeks enthusiastic, hard working and motivated candidates who wish to pursue a career in academic dermatology. CONTACT: Nasim Fazel MD, DDS. PHONE# PHONE#

31 So You Want To Be An Emergency Doctor? ADVICE FROM PROGRAM DIRECTOR Most important to perform well on Emergency department rotations and core rotations (e.g. Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics). High board scores certainly help, but most EM programs focus on the “whole package”. Very low board scores will hurt most applicants. There are limited positions nationwide, but about 95% of US seniors who apply only to EM will match in EM. This means that the vast majority of UCD SOM graduates should be able to match in an EM program somewhere, as long as they have an appropriate application strategy (get an advisor!!). There is no early match Of the 136 EM programs in the US, 15 are PGY2-4 programs (3-year programs that require completion of an internship). More information about programs at -- go to residency catalog. Research is not required, but it can strengthen your application. Some programs care more about this than others. If you truly have no desire to do research during medical school, it is probably not worth your effort. Students should seek advice on residency in their M2 or M3 year. There is no ‘ideal’ applicant, but most programs want these qualities: – –Academic–strong performance in medical school overall, especially ED rotations – –Personal–outstanding interpersonal skills, enthusiasm about the specialty and about learning, empathy for patients, strong work ethic, balanced individual who will do well in a busy training program CONTACT: PHONE# CONTACT: Molly Fling, Residency Program Manager, PHONE# (916)

32 So You Want To Be An ENT (Otorhinolaryngologist?) ADVICE FROM PROGRAM DIRECTOR Grades/numbers highly influence on match in Otolaryngology There are limited positions nationwide. There is no early match. There is no PGY II match. Research experience makes the applicant more competitive. Students should seek advice from faculty beginning in their M1 or M2 year. Our goal is to chose people who are academically competitive, well-rounded; often excelling in areas outside of medicine. CONTACT: Sally Mohr, Residency Coordinator CONTACT: Sally Mohr, Residency Coordinator PHONE# PHONE#

33 So You Want To Be A Family Practitioner? Advice From Program Director: The UCDMC Family Practice program gives no systematic weight to USMLE Step 1, but if it’s low this could be a red flag to pay attention to other evidences of academic difficulties which, collectively, might drop a student from contention. A high USMLE score is a bonus, but less important than the dean’s letter and other measures of performance and personality. Clinical evaluations are most important. I suspect this thinking is similar in most FP residency programs. More on next slide

34 So You Want To Be A Family Practitioner?(cont). Positions are available, with a wide range and number of programs There is no early match There is no PGY2 match. Research is not essential. Students should seek advice from our faculty in their M3 and M4 years. We seek people dedicated to learning a wide range of skills (including a rigorous inpatient training) in order to become excellent primary care physicians. Excellent communication skills are sought as well. Contact: Tom Balsbaugh MS; Tel ; Other mentors: Kay Nelsen MD, Assoc.Program Director: Geriatrics: Geriatrics: Womens’ health, OB: Suzanne Eidson-Ton; Womens’ health, OB: Suzanne Eidson-Ton;

35 So You Want To Be An Internist? Advice From Program Director: (M3-4 also see next page) We don’t pay much attention to Step I USMLE unless it’s very low (below 200 or so). Step II may be slightly more predictive of clinical knowledge, so I might pay more attention to it. The most competitive programs may use Step I scores because they can, having many excellent applicants. There are over 400 IM programs and about 4700 categorical IM positions across the country. West Coast tends to be more competitive than the rest of the country. There are over 400 IM programs and about 4700 categorical IM positions across the country. West Coast tends to be more competitive than the rest of the country. There is no early match. There is no early match. There is no PGYII match, but transfers top PGYII positions may occur if the applicant is released from their contractual obligation to their original program. There is no PGYII match, but transfers top PGYII positions may occur if the applicant is released from their contractual obligation to their original program. Demonstrated excellence in research may enhance competitiveness, but is not absolutely required. Demonstrated excellence in research may enhance competitiveness, but is not absolutely required. Students should seek advice from our faculty at any time, even from the M1 year on. Students should seek advice from our faculty at any time, even from the M1 year on. UCD IM program considers a variety of criteria in evaluating candidates, including but not limited to: basic science and clinical performance (particularly in IM rotations), commitment to IM, USMLE scores, volunteer and leadership activities, scholarshp, and personal characteristics as determined by letters, personal statement, and interview. No single criterion is weighted automatically more than others; we seek people with demonstrated excellence in one or more of the areas listed above. UCD IM program considers a variety of criteria in evaluating candidates, including but not limited to: basic science and clinical performance (particularly in IM rotations), commitment to IM, USMLE scores, volunteer and leadership activities, scholarshp, and personal characteristics as determined by letters, personal statement, and interview. No single criterion is weighted automatically more than others; we seek people with demonstrated excellence in one or more of the areas listed above. CONTACTS: Drs. Mark Henderson, Frederick Meyers (Chairman), Faith Fitzgerald, Craig Keenan, Tonya Fancher, Jorge Garcia. PHONE #

36 So You Want To Be An Internist ? (cont.) Advice From Program Director For Your 4 th Year: Internal Medicine Recommendations for Fourth Year Students Internal Medicine programs train physicians who will be able to work in either the inpatient or outpatient setting. During the course of training, residents may choose to emphasize a particular area within internal medicine such as: inpatient medicine (hospitalist), outpatient medicine (ambulatory or primary care internal medicine), or subspecialty internal medicine (cardiology, pulmonology, gastroenterology, infectious diseases, nephrology, endocrinology, rheumatology, hematology/oncology). Many programs, including our own, have a separate “Primary Care Track” that emphasizes the outpatient experience, in addition to the “categorical” track, which emphasizes inpatient or subspecialty internal medicine experiences. Graduates of internal medicine programs may elect to pursue careers in the following areas: academic medicine, basic science or clinical research, primary care practice, or subspecialty practice. (cont.next page)

37 So You Want To Be An Internist ? (cont.) Advice From Program Director For Your 4 th Year (cont): Suggested Rotations. There is no strict formula except to choose rotations that interest you. However, we would suggest your consider the following rotations: At least one acting internship in internal medicine (e.g., MICU or general medicine wards). Such rotations may be used to build your basic internal medicine skills and may also be an opportunity to obtain a valuable letter of recommendation. Away rotations. Consider doing an away IM rotation either to find our more about a particular residency program or to “make a good impression” on a program of interest. Away rotations are by no means required. One or two IM subspecialty rotations. There are numerous rotations but the most popular ones include: infectious diseases, nephrology, cardiology, pulmonary, endocrinology (a good outpatient subspecialty experience), or EKG interpretation. Non-IM rotations. Choose one or two broad based experiences such as emergency medicine, neurology, dermatology, gynecology, or radiology (especially chest film or body CT scan interpretation). Consider a two-week ophthalmology elective to develop basic eye examination skills.

38 So You Want To Be A Neurologist? ADVICE FROM PROGRAM DIRECTOR High grades and exam scores highly influence your match in Neurology There are not limited positions nationwide. Neurology is not in NRMP match. SF match only has one match which is early. There is no late match for SF match. There is a PG1 match and a PG2 match. Two positions in each match with a total of four. Research is not required. Students should seek advice from faculty beginning in their M3 year. Our program is seeking, ideally, hard working, conscientious, and compassionate residents. CONTACT: David Richman, M.D. CONTACT: David Richman, M.D. PHONE# PHONE#

39 So You Want To Be A Neurosurgeon? ADVICE FROM PROGRAM DIRECTOR Grades and numbers must be high. If below 90 th % on USMLEs there will be little chance of an interview. There are limited (#140) positions nationwide. There are limited (#140) positions nationwide. There is no early match, but we take candidates outside the match. There is no early match, but we take candidates outside the match. There is no PGY2 match. There is no PGY2 match. Research in medical school is highly desirable, especially in basic or clinical sciences related to neurosurgery. Research in medical school is highly desirable, especially in basic or clinical sciences related to neurosurgery. Seek advice from the faculty beginning in the M1 year. Seek advice from the faculty beginning in the M1 year. Candidates should be highly motivated (successful in another career helps), creative (showing original artwork impresses!), academically inclined. Candidates should be highly motivated (successful in another career helps), creative (showing original artwork impresses!), academically inclined. CONTACT: J.Paul Muizelaar PHONE#

40 So You Want To Do Nuclear Medicine? ADVICE FROM PROGRAM DIRECTOR  Grades/numbers are of medium importance. Clinical clerkship rotations with good impressions are very important.  There are only about 50 Nuclear Medicine programs in the nation.  There is no early match.  There is a PGY II national match approximately two years ahead of time.  Research experience is desirable.  Students should seek advice from faculty beginning in their M2 or early M3 year.  Our goal is to chose students who are bright, interested and motivated. Good interpersonal skills are important.  CONTACT: David K. Shelton, M.D.  PHONE# 

41 So You Want To Be An Ob-gyn? Advice From Program Director Step I is more important than Step II, which is considered easier than Step I. Success on first try at Step I is predictive of future success on similar tests, and so on licensing. Step I is more important than Step II, which is considered easier than Step I. Success on first try at Step I is predictive of future success on similar tests, and so on licensing. Step I scores of 200 or higher generally get interviews before other candidates. However, all things are considered, including Dean’s letter, personal statement, etc. A low USMLE score does not preclude someone from going into OB-GYN. Step I scores of 200 or higher generally get interviews before other candidates. However, all things are considered, including Dean’s letter, personal statement, etc. A low USMLE score does not preclude someone from going into OB-GYN. In OB-GYN here, USMLE scores and clerkship grades (especially in OB-GYN, surgery and internal medicine) are considered factual data and ranked high. The dean’s letter is considered ‘opinions’. In OB-GYN here, USMLE scores and clerkship grades (especially in OB-GYN, surgery and internal medicine) are considered factual data and ranked high. The dean’s letter is considered ‘opinions’. More on next slide

42 So You Want To Be An Ob-gyn?(continued) Advice From Program Director There is no ‘early match’. There is no ‘early match’. There is no PGY2 match. There is no PGY2 match. Research is highly desirable and can start about your M2 year. Research is highly desirable and can start about your M2 year. The program seeks people interested in women’s heath care and who like to work with their hands, be fast-paced, team-players who like being busy, and who like variety in their days-i.e. in clinics, O.R., Labor & Delivery, etc. The program seeks people interested in women’s heath care and who like to work with their hands, be fast-paced, team-players who like being busy, and who like variety in their days-i.e. in clinics, O.R., Labor & Delivery, etc. Begin seeking advice on Ob-Gyn from faculty in your M2 year. CONTACTS. Clara Paik: Mary Mary

43 So You Want To Be An Ophthalmologist? ADVICE FROM PROGRAM DIRECTOR  Grades and board scores are important but do not either exclude an applicant or assure an interview. We do receive numerous applications in the 90% range on USMLE.  There are limited positions nationwide and match is very competitive.  There is an early SF match.  There is a PGY2 match.  Research experience is not required but very desirable.  Students should seek advice from faculty beginning in their M1 or M2 or M3 year.  Our program is looking for well-rounded, talented, very smart, independent, hard-working people who like delicate surgery and a variety of clinical situations, including working with young and old patients with acute through chronic diseases. Students who like learning and want to make it a life long process.  CONTACT: Jeffrey J. Caspar, M.D.  PHONE# 

44 So You Want To Be An Orthopaedist? ADVICE FROM PROGRAM DIRECTOR High USMLE scores and honor level grades are essential for interview selection. High USMLE scores and honor level grades are essential for interview selection. There are limited positions nationwide. There are limited positions nationwide. There is no early match. There is no early match. Rarely there are PGYII positions available. Rarely there are PGYII positions available. Research is highly desirable. Research is highly desirable. We are looking for intelligent, hard working, self-motivated individuals who work well with others. We are looking for intelligent, hard working, self-motivated individuals who work well with others. CONTACT: David Hak CONTACT: David Hak Phone #

45 So You Want To Be A Pathologist? ADVICE FROM PROGRAM DIRECTOR Grades are of importance in our choices, but of lesser significance than the totality of the applicant’s accomplishments, character and dedication. Grades are of importance in our choices, but of lesser significance than the totality of the applicant’s accomplishments, character and dedication. There is no limitation on positions nationwide. There is no limitation on positions nationwide. There is no early match. There is no early match. There is no PGY II match. There is no PGY II match. Research during medical school is desirable, but not required. Research during medical school is desirable, but not required. A student should seek advice from our faculty in the M3 year. A student should seek advice from our faculty in the M3 year. Candidates should be motivated, well rounded, well- recommended and a team player. Candidates should be motivated, well rounded, well- recommended and a team player. CONTACT : Rajen Ramsamooj or Kim Janatpour Phone # :

46 So You Want To Be A Pediatrician? ADVICE FROM PROGRAM DIRECTOR We are interested in students who pass tests without difficulty, and students who barely pass may have difficulty with Step III, which means they can’t get a California license (which is required to do their third year of residency). Failure to pass the pediatric boards, furthermore, reflects poorly on our program and may cause problems with our residency review committee. We realize the boards are a multiple choice exam predictive of only how one will do on the next such exam, not on clinical performance per se.While a board score less than 200 is not an automatic disqualifier, low scores coupled with low grades in preclinical years and clerkships is a problem. I advise students not to worry too much about boards, but to work very hard during the clerkships (we do note these grades and comments). I think most pediatric programs take a similar approach. CONTACT : Dan West Phone # :

47 So You Want To Be A PMR Doctor? ADVICE FROM PROGRAM DIRECTOR: Good grades and test scores will allow you to pick your program.With average numbers, positions are available, but probably not in the best programs. The West Coast is more competitive than the East. Good grades and test scores will allow you to pick your program.With average numbers, positions are available, but probably not in the best programs. The West Coast is more competitive than the East. There are 79 programs with about 360 total positions in the US. There are 79 programs with about 360 total positions in the US. There is no early match. There is no early match. We match a year ahead (typically med school seniors) for PGYII positions. We match a year ahead (typically med school seniors) for PGYII positions. Research as a med student is highly desirable. Research as a med student is highly desirable. You should begin seeking advice from PMR faculty in your M2 year You should begin seeking advice from PMR faculty in your M2 year Our programs seek students with good numbers and excellent clinical evaluations. Your personal statement should reflect knowledge of PM&R and why you choose it. You should do electives in PM&R and related specialties. You must pass USMLE on 1 st try. Our programs seek students with good numbers and excellent clinical evaluations. Your personal statement should reflect knowledge of PM&R and why you choose it. You should do electives in PM&R and related specialties. You must pass USMLE on 1 st try. CONTACTS: Carol Vandenakker MD; Pat Settje, res.coordinator Phone #:

48 So You Want To Be A Plastic Surgeon? ADVICE FROM PROGRAM DIRECTOR Grades and USMLE scores are very important in ranking candidates, as are personal interviews. An acting internship in our specialty is also of some importance. Grades and USMLE scores are very important in ranking candidates, as are personal interviews. An acting internship in our specialty is also of some importance. There are a limited number of positions nationwide. There are a limited number of positions nationwide. There is an early match. There is an early match. There is a PGY II match. There is a PGY II match. Research during medical school is not necessary for our specialty. Research during medical school is not necessary for our specialty. Students should seek advice from our faculty beginning in their M3 year. Students should seek advice from our faculty beginning in their M3 year. We seek residents interested in a surgical specialty that requires creativity, an interest in operating all over the body in young and old patients, and a personality that deals well with people. We seek residents interested in a surgical specialty that requires creativity, an interest in operating all over the body in young and old patients, and a personality that deals well with people. CONTACTS: Thomas Stevenson, M.D. Phone #:

49 So You Want To Be A Psychiatrist? ADVICE FROM PROGRAM DIRECTOR Clerkship grades are most important, pre-clinical grades and Steps 1 & 2 USMLE less important – unless there is a failing grade. We don’t talk about Step I scores in selection committee unless the students either have an unusually high score or failed their first time. If they failed first try, they may not be invited to interview. A 2 nd failed attempt is fatal in our program. We see USMLE Steps I & II as a predictor of passing Step III and future written exams – not much else. There are not limited positions nationwide There is no early match There is no PGY2 match. Research is desirable but not necessary Students should seek advice in their M3 year. Ideally, the psychiatry program is looking for a skilled clinician with capacity for introspection and psychological-mindedness, strong interpersonal skills, and fascination with human behavior. CONTACTS: Mark Servis, M.D. Phone #:

50 So You Want To Be A Public Health Doctor? ADVICE FROM AN EXPERT UC Davis Master in Public Health Program UC Davis Master in Public Health Program Applicants must be in good standing. Although high grades are helpful, we consider other factors as well. Interested and qualified students are likely to find a position somewhere. There is no match for MPH programs. Students apply individually and directly to the program. Research experience is looked upon favorably, but is not essential. We consider other factors as well. Students should seek advice from our faculty at whatever point in their education they begin to consider public health. We are looking for dedicated, enthusiastic physicians who hope to make a difference in the health of populations. CONTACT CONTACT Stephen McCurdy, MD MPH (UCD MPH Program Director) Phone #:

51 Advice from Program Director Radiation oncology has become extremely competitive in recent years. Grades and USMLE scores are important and used to compare applicants initially. An elective rotation at the program of choice and a superb performance during that rotation is of foremost importance. There are limited positions nationwide. isno There is no early match. is There is a PGY II match. Research is highly desirable; showing research interest and initiative adds to competitiveness. M3 and early M4 Begin to seek advice from faculty in the M3 and early M4 years. We seek academically oriented and highly motivated individuals. CONTACT: Janice Ryu, M.D. or Lisa Reevesman Phone: or So You Want to be a Radiation Oncologist?

52 So You Want To Be A Radiologist? ADVICE FROM PROGRAM DIRECTOR In reviewing applications for Diagnostic Radiology residency, we try to be objective in terms of past performance. Academic performance is one of the factors we utilize in selecting our potential applications for interviews. Important also is whether the applicant has done a Radiology elective and shown great interest in the UC Davis Radiology Program. There are a limited number of positions in Radiology nationwide. Diagnostic Radiology has become very competitive in the past few years. There are few programs that match for the PGY1 position. The majority of programs require a preliminary year followed by a match at the PGY2 position. There is a PGY2 match, including those selected at UC Davis. Research is not required during medical school, but it is highly desirable. The earlier the student seeks advice, the better, in the M1-2 year. This can then allow him or her to focus attention more specifically in radiology, start a dialogue with a faculty in radiology or start research or a project that would take some time to complete. Still, many resident applicants have not sought advice until their early fourth year and have been a successful applicant. Our program is seeking well-qualified students who are highly motivated and show a track record of success in graduate and medical school. Research that is focused towards radiology is a bonus but not required for a successful match into Radiology. CONTACT CONTACT John P. McGahan, M.D. Phone #:

53 So You Want To Be A Surgeon? Advice From Program Director We put significant value on Step I scores, and very little on Step II – only a small number of students have Step II scores at the time we’re making decisions about resident selection. The important information in an application to us is, in rank order: 1) performance on 3 rd year clerkships; 2) performance on USMLE Step I; 3) performance in the first two years of med school; 4) recommendation letters; 5)dean’s letter; 6) extracurricular activities, and 7) personal statement. There are limited positions nationwide. There is no early match. There is no PGY2 match. Research is not required. Students should seek advice from faculty in their M2- M3 year. We are anxious to attract diverse, outstanding candidates who will thrive at UC Davis. Our aim is to recruit a group of superbly qualified physicians who will enjoy our rigorous training program. We invite you to examine our residency program by visiting our web page at ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/surgery. CONTACTS: Lynnette Scherer, M.D. Phone #: or

54 So You Want To Be A Urologist? ADVICE FROM PROGRAM DIRECTOR Grades and test scores need to be high to match in Urology. Most that are invited to interview have board scores in 90 th %, 50% honors grades, and 50%+ are AOA. Grades and test scores need to be high to match in Urology. Most that are invited to interview have board scores in 90 th %, 50% honors grades, and 50%+ are AOA. There are limited positions nationally, and only about 15% go unfilled in the match. There are limited positions nationally, and only about 15% go unfilled in the match. There is an early match in urology. There is an early match in urology. There is no PGY2 match. There is no PGY2 match. Research is highly desirable; most invited for interview are involved in past research. Research is highly desirable; most invited for interview are involved in past research. more on next slide

55 So You Want To Be A Urologist?(continued) Students should seek advice on residency from our faculty beginning in their M2 year. The program seeks candidates who are committed to their education and training, and have personality traits that fit with existing staff and residents. CONTACT: Roger Low MD:

56 There Will Always Be More Questions… Feel free to call or College Directors and Deans Amerish Bera, M.D., , College Director and Assistant Dean, Admissions and Outreach Constance Bowe, M.D., , Director Constance Bowe, M.D., , College John T. Owings, M.D., , Assistant Dean, Student Affairs Michael Wilkes, M.D., Ph.D , Vice Dean Medical Education Dan West, M.D., , College Director and Pediatrics Program Director Jorge Garcia, M.D., , College Director and Internal Medicine: Gastroenterology Program Director Tonya Fancher, M.D., , College Director and Assistant Program Director, Internal Medicine

57 Program Directors AnesthesiologyMoore, (916) Dermatology Lynch, Emergency Medicine Sokolove, (916) Family & Community MedBalsbaugh, (916) Internal Med.Henderson, (916) Neurological SurgeryMuizelaar, J. (916) NeurologyRichman, (916) Nuclear Medicine Shelton, (916) OB/GYN Ciotti, (916) Ophthalmology Caspar, (916) more on next slide

58 Program Directors (continued) OrthopaedicsHak, David (916) Pathology Ramsamooj, Raj (916) PediatricsWest, Dan (916) PM & R Vandenakker, Carol (916) PsychiatryServis, (916) RadiologyMcGahan, (916) SurgeryScherer, (916) Plastic Surgery Stevenson, Thomas UrologyLow, (916)

59 ASK FOR ADVICE FROM THE FACULTY…THEY’RE EAGER TO HELP! BECAUSE MEDICAL SCHOOL IS ONLY THE BEGINNING OF YOUR MEDICAL EDUCATION.


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