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1 Cyberbullying National Crime Prevention Council 2011 © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council www.ncpc.org.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Cyberbullying National Crime Prevention Council 2011 © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council www.ncpc.org."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Cyberbullying National Crime Prevention Council 2011 © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

2 2 Goal of This Presentation To inform participants of the tragic effects of cyberbullying and detail strategies for preventing and responding to this form of abuse. © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

3 3 Objectives To identify and understand What is cyerbullying Various cyberbullying behaviors The tragic effects of cyberbullying The warning signs that a child is being cyberbullied Steps adults can take to prevent and address cyberbullying © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

4 4 What is Cyberbullying? © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

5 5 Cyberbullying Cyberbullying is using the Internet, cell phones, or other technology to send or post text or images intended to hurt or embarrass another person. © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

6 6 Examples of Cyberbullying Starting rumors through instant messaging Name calling in chat rooms Forwarding private messages to others Insults through social media websites Posting demeaning pictures of someone else Making fake profiles on websites, such as Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, etc. © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

7 7 Cyberbullying Differs From Traditional Bullying © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council CyberbullyingTraditional Bullying Can be AnonymousDirect/In person May occur in childs home Happens on school/community property May seem inescapableCan escape at home May be an extension of traditional bullying

8 8 Cyberbullying: The Facts Things posted online are visible to the world 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Cruel messages can be sent, forwarded, or viewed by virtually anyone. Messages can be sent in a split second. Cyberbullying can be an extension of bullying that youth are experiencing in school. It can be harsher because people tend to act differently online than in person. © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

9 9 Facts and Figures Teens spend an average of 26.8 hours a week online. 72 percent of teens have some type of social networking profile. 60 percent of teens use instant messaging. 91 percent of teens have an address. Source: Cox Communications 2009 © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

10 10 Facts and Figures (continued) 43 percent of teens have experienced some form of cyberbullying. Cyberbullying victimization is higher among females than males. – 36 percent of females report having experienced some form of cyberbullying compared to 33 percent of males. 16 percent of females and 18 percent of males report that they have cyberbullied. Source: NCPC 2007 © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

11 11 Why Do Youth Cyberbully? 81 percent think its funny. 64 percent say they simply dont like the person. 45 percent view the victim as a loser. 58 percent probably didnt see the action as a big deal. Source: NCPC Teens and Cyberbully Survey, 2007 © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

12 12 Why Prevention Matters Bullying is not a rite of passage. Youth who are cyberbullied may lack a safe retreat. It can be emotionally damaging. You can empower youth to seek help and not suffer alone. © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

13 13 Why Prevention Matters Victim service providers report why youth chose not seek help: –61 percent report that youth feel they can handle the situation on their own. –52 percent report youth are concerned about retaliation if they report. –37 percent believe youth are ashamed of the incident. –38 percent believe youth fear getting into trouble because of the incident. Source: NCPC 2010 Cyberbullying Prevention Research © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

14 14 Youth Testimonies I think I could put up with a certain amount of bullying, but if it got really hurtful, I would speak out. Unless they are threatening your life or the life of someone you know, it shouldnt matter. I think most kids are reluctant to tell someone because they think it makes them look like a little kid who is tattling. © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

15 15 Who Cyberbullies? Can come from any economic, cultural, or religious background Lack empathy Are concerned with their own desires rather than those of others Find it difficult to see things from someone elses perspective Are willing to use others to get what they want © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

16 16 How Does it Feel? Youth who are cyberbullied report – 55 percent feel angry – 43 percent feel helpless – 42 percent feel scared – 36 percent feel vulnerable – 23 percent are looking for revenge Source: NCPC 2010 Cyberbullying Prevention Research © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

17 17 How Do Victims React? Victims of cyberbullying have – Asked the bully to stop – Blocked the communication – Talked to friends about bullying – Signed offline – Did nothing – Least likely response: talk to parents about the incident © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

18 18 Spotting the Signs of Cyberbullying Emotional Social/Behavioral Academic © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

19 19 Emotional Signs Withdrawal or shyness Depression Moody Irritable Anxiety Aggressive behavior Suicide ideation Loss of self-esteem © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

20 20 Social/Behavioral Suddenly stops using computer Upset after using computer or cell phone Changes in eating or sleeping habits (e.g., nightmares) No longer wanting to participate in activities once enjoyed Hurting self, attempting or threatening suicide Suddenly changing or avoiding friends © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

21 21 Academic Not wanting to go to school Skipping school Lost interest in school Drop in grades © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

22 22 RED FLAG The biggest red flag that a child is being cyberbullied is a withdrawal from technology. If you notice a sudden change in computer or phone usage talk to the child, they may be a victim of cyberbullying. © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

23 23 Warning Signs That Someone is Cyberbullying Others Spends large amounts of time on computer Hides or turns off monitor when someone approaches Appears anxious while using computer Especially upset when technological privileges are revoked © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

24 24 Awareness Video © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

25 25 Small Group Discussion Question 1: What are some things victim service providers, SROs, or school counselors can do within the school to prevent cyberbullying? Question 2: What types of training or resources should school staff and faculty receive on cyberbullying? Question 3: What is your school or community doing to address the issue of cyberbullying? What more could be done? © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

26 26 What YOU Can Do © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

27 27 Cyberbullying Prevention For Parents For Educators For Law Enforcement Officers For Community Partners © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

28 28 Where Youth Go for Help 69 percent turn to parents. 52 percent reach out to friends. 23 percent talk with a teacher. 8 percent would call a victims hotline or victims advocate. Source: NCPC 2010 Teen Nation Research © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

29 29 Parents Learn what teens are doing online and keep track of their online behavior. Use the Internet with your children. Talk with youth about cyberbullyingthe consequences and harmful effects. Communicate online rules and responsibilities to youth. Keep computers in a highly trafficked room where online activities are hard to hide. © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

30 30 Educators Request that youth sign an Internet safety pledge promising not to cyberbully. Establish acceptable Internet use and anti- cyberbullying policies in school. Talk to and educate students on the issue of cyberbullying. Let students know where they can turn for help. Educate parents on the importance of creating Internet use rules at home. © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

31 31 Law Enforcement Officers Stay up-to-date on cyberbullying issues and laws. Educate yourself on the latest technologies youth use. Speak out to students, parents, and educators about the dangers of the Internet. Talk with school officials about creating an anti-cyberbullying policy on school grounds. © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

32 32 Community Partners Organize a community discussion on cybersafety involving students, parents, educators, law enforcement, etc. Provide counseling, extended service programs, or other youth programs or services. Work with school technology departments to make sure youth are being safe. Help recruit additional volunteers to take an active role in cyberbullying prevention. © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

33 33 For Everyone Take complaints about cyberbullying seriously. Support the child being bullied. Reassure the child that he or she was right to tell you the problem. Empower youth witnessing the bullying. Work together to address the problem! © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

34 34 Programs and Services © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

35 35 NCPC Programs/Resources © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council McGruff Club Community Works Be Safe and Sound Samanthas Choice Public Service Advertising

36 36 McGruff Club Scripted lessons guide instructors through classroom discussions and activities for children in grades 1 through 4. Activities, incorporating proven teaching strategies, develop childrens critical thinking and communication skills. Lessons build upon each other, so children enhance their skills as they age through the program. © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

37 37 Community Works Comprehensive curriculum which includes 31 sessions on community safety, violent crimes, substance abuse, property crimes, hate crimes, and bullying and cyberbullying. Lessons to guide young people through a service-learning project Short warm-up activities that nurture positive relationships among teens. © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

38 38 Be Safe and Sound © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council Program Model Step 1: Build an action team Step 2: Assess safety and security issues Step 3: Hold a school safety and security forum Step 4: Develop an action plan Step 5: Publicize activities Step 6: Promote your cause Step 7: Evaluate success Engages school administrators, parents, students, law enforcement, and other community members in making school safer.

39 39 Samanthas Choice Samanathas Choice is a five- minute video that follows the story of a young girl who is afraid to go to ballet class, for fear of being bullied. Specifically aimed at respect in the community, this new anti-bullying animated short has an educators guide with instructions on how to use the video in a classroom or club setting. © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

40 40 NCPC Public Service Advertising © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council For more information on NCPCs Public Service Advertising, please visit

41 41 Whom To Contact Local Law Enforcement-There is no national law against cyberbullying. Your local law enforcement is your best first resource. National Center for Victims Of Crime Helpline: FYI-CALL ( ) Suicide Prevention Hotline:1-800-SUICIDE ( ) © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

42 42 Additional Resources -Provides Internet safety information for children, teens, and adults -Provides cyberbullying prevention and Internet safety information for parents, teachers, police officers, and children and youth -Provides information for adults and children on cyberbullying and face-to-face bullying Lists cyberbullying laws state by state © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

43 43 Question and Answers? © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

44 44 The National Crime Prevention Council 2001 Jefferson Davis Highway Suite 901 Arlington, VA fax *This project was produced by Grant No SZ-B9-K007 awarded by the Office for Victims of Crime, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this document are those of the contributors and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice. © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council

45 45 Presenter Contact Information © 2011 National Crime Prevention Council


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