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About Transition This training is provided in collaboration with the Oregon Department of Education 2004.

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Presentation on theme: "About Transition This training is provided in collaboration with the Oregon Department of Education 2004."— Presentation transcript:

1 About Transition This training is provided in collaboration with the Oregon Department of Education 2004

2 Transition in IDEA (d) ► The purpose of IDEA is:  to ensure that all children with disabilities have available to them a free appropriate public education that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepare them for further education, employment, and independent living.

3 Transition Timeline ► Age 16 –Transition Plan ► Age 18 – Age of Majority ► Age 21 – School Services End

4 Transition Services ► Is a results-oriented process focused on improving academic and functional achievement

5 Definition of Transition Services 602(34)(A) The term “transition services” means a coordinated set of activities for a child with a disability that ► is designed to be within a results-oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child with a disability to facilitate the child’s movement from school to post-school activities, including post-secondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation.

6 Definitions (continued) Transition Services: takes into account the child’s strengths, preferences, and interests; and includes instruction, related services, community experiences, the development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives, and when appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation.

7 Individualized Education Programs 614(d)(1)(A)(VIII) ► Beginning no later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child is 16, and updated annually thereafter, the IEP must address all transition services requirements.

8 Individualized Education Programs 614(c)(5) ► Evaluation and reevaluation for termination of services is not required for students who receive a regular diploma or exceed the age of eligibility under State law.

9 Individualized Education Programs 614(d)(1)(A)(VIII) The IEP team will develop: ► Appropriate measurable postsecondary goals based on age- appropriate transition assessments related to training, education, employment, and possible independent living skills.

10 Individualized Education Programs 614(d)(1)(A)(VIII) The IEP team will develop: ► Transition services (including courses of study) needed to assist the child in reaching his or her postsecondary goals

11 Individualized Education Programs 614(d)(1)(A)(VIII) The IEP team will develop and document: ► Measurable annual goals, including academic and functional goals ► Agency participation ► Graduation date

12 Summary of Performance 614(c)(5)(B)(ii) The district must: ► Provide the child with a summary of the child’s academic achievement and functional performance, which shall include recommendations on how to assist the child in meeting the child’s postsecondary goals. ► Provide the child with a summary of the child’s academic achievement and functional performance, which shall include recommendations on how to assist the child in meeting the child’s postsecondary goals.

13 Transfer of Rights 614(d)(1)(A)(VII) ► Occurs not later than 1 year before the child reaches the age of majority under State law. ► Must have a statement that the child and parent have been informed of the child’s rights that will transfer to the child on reaching the age of majority.

14 What Comes Next? ► Vision is the ability to see, not what is, but what could or will be… ► Planning for the future ► So how do we get there?

15 Self Advocacy Skills Self Advocacy is being able to speak for yourself. Can the student express: Can the student express: ► How he learns ► What she is good at ► What he likes ► Accommodations needed ► Goals for the future ► How their disability affects their ability to learn

16 The Transition Plan ► Prepare before the IEP/Transition meeting ► Identify the student’s vision and goals ► Focus on interests, strengths and preferences, but address the needs/weaknesses ► Remember it’s about the student ► Will the student run the meeting? ► Invite people outside the school

17 Who Else Could be on the Team? ► Team members are determined by the student’s post school goals. Some examples are: ► Possible Employers ► Friends and Relatives ► Recreation Representative ► College/Adult Education Representative ► Mental Health and Addiction Services ► Seniors and Persons with Disabilities ► Independent Living Center ► Brokerages/Personal Agents ► Vocational Rehabilitation ► Employment Organization ► YTP

18 How Do Agencies Support the IEP Team in the Transition Process? Agency partnerships allow students with disabilities the best opportunity for an organized, coordinated support system after exiting school by: Offering additional resources for learning employability and independent living skills Offering additional resources for learning employability and independent living skills Teaching strategies to access local business and industry resources Teaching strategies to access local business and industry resources Promoting greater awareness of additional community services Promoting greater awareness of additional community services Informing students of funding sources Informing students of funding sources Providing specialized expertise Providing specialized expertise Apprising the team of any future service options Apprising the team of any future service options

19 Role of Agencies in the Transition Process Develop agreements, define roles, and coordinate services between the school and service agencies. Develop agreements, define roles, and coordinate services between the school and service agencies. Provide agreed upon service and support to transition team. Provide agreed upon service and support to transition team. Communicate pertinent service needs to the transition team including the current plan: Communicate pertinent service needs to the transition team including the current plan: What services are currently being provided to the student? What services are currently being provided to the student? How are current services assisting the fulfillment of the student’s ongoing educational goals? How are current services assisting the fulfillment of the student’s ongoing educational goals?

20 Suggestions for Families Working with Agency Professionals ► Become familiar with eligibility requirements, procedures, and services of the agency. ► Be persistent. ► Make connections early. ► Make sure you are communicating with the correct agency representative. ► Be persistent. ► Plan to develop a positive relationship with an agency representative. ► Be assertive; not argumentative or aggressive. ► Be persistent.

21 Post Secondary Education IS an Option ► What are the student’s preferences? ► Does the student’s long term goal require /include additional education? ► What course is the student interested in pursuing?

22 Post Secondary Considerations ► Options to consider…  University, College, Community College, Trade School ► Major, or Program of interest ► Entrance requirements  Script for interviews with colleges  Documentation needs

23 College Legal Standard College Legal Standard ► Subpart E of the Regulation (34 CFR 104) ► Cannot discriminate on the basis of disability ► Must provide “academic adjustments” & “auxiliary aids” to allow disabled students equal access to the program. ► Grievance procedure is only explicit procedural requirement

24 Basic Principles ► College students are adults, who are expected to act and advocate for themselves. ► Colleges do NOT have an affirmative duty to identify, evaluate, develop an individual education plan, or to provide FAPE

25 “Essential Requirements” ► Colleges are not required to alter the fundamental nature of their programs ► Colleges are not required to change academic requirements which are  essential to the program, or  directly related to licensing requirements

26 Placement Tests/Accommodations ► SAT, ACT… ► ► Extended time is not flagged on the SAT ► Community Colleges have open enrollment, but specific courses may have prerequisite or technical standard requirements

27 College Students With Disabilities Have the Right To: ► Equal Access to Courses, Programs, Services, Jobs Activities and Facilities ► Reasonable and Appropriate Accommodations, Academic Adjustments, and /or Auxiliary Aids ► Appropriate Confidentiality of All Information Pertaining to the Disability

28 College Students With Disabilities Have the Responsibility To: ► Meet Qualifications; both Academic and Institutional ► Self-Identify as a Person with a Disability When Requesting an Accommodation ► Provide Documentation from a Qualified Source ► Follow School’s Procedures for Obtaining Accommodations

29 Disability Documentation ► The IEP or 504 plan is NOT sufficient documentation. ► Check with the College the year before you plan to enroll for what documentation is required and acceptable. ► “The Office” may have a specific form. ► Neither the School District, nor the College are required to conduct the evaluations for post secondary documentation requirements.

30 What Can You Expect From College ► Disability Services Office ► Reasonable Accommodations must be requested by the student (examples are)  Note takers  Books on tape  Interpreters  Extra time for tests or coursework

31 “Academic Adjustments” 34 CFR (a) ► Modifications of academic requirements to ensure they do not discriminate. E.g.,  Change in length of time to complete a program  Substitution of courses  adaptation of manner in which courses are conducted

32 “Auxiliary Aids” 34 CFR (d) ► Taped texts, interpreters, readers, note takers, adapted computers, Braille, to provide access to program content. ► Colleges are not required to provide “personal devices or services” (e.g., attendant, wheelchair, tutor)

33 Testing 34 CFR (c) ► Test format and administration should measure students’ achievement, not students’ impairments. ► Examples:  different format (e.g., tape vs. print, usually not multiple choice vs. essay)  extended time  reader

34 Support at the College Level ► Disability Student Services Office ► Services may vary and are decided on a case by case basis, but may include:  Course planning assistance  Accommodation selection assistance  Academic Adjustments/Course Waivers  Tutoring  Extended time to finish a program  Information and Referral

35 Living at the College ► Accessibility of the Student Services Office ► Transportation ► Dormitory vs. Apartment ► Food Services ► Financial Aid ► Tuition and Books ► Clothing ► Medical care ► Social Activities

36 Parents and College ► Student records are confidential and are not available to parents on request ► The student may sign a release so that the parent can access records, and talk with staff ► The student must take responsibility for their college career

37 Paying for College ► Financial Aid – Grants, Scholarships and Loans ► ► ► ► ► ► SSI, PASS, and Vocational Rehabilitation

38 Post Secondary Resources Resources ► Educational Testing Service ► AHEAD – ► Oregon Department of Education ► National Transition Network ► HEATH ► POST-ITT ►

39 Employment A Different Option

40 Transition to Work ► What does the student want to do?  Learn about occupations ► What skills are needed for the job? ► Is special training required? ► Where are the opportunities for employment?  Are there job opportunities locally? ► What assistance is needed?  Who can help?

41 Youth Transition Program (YTP) Students receive:  Individualized planning focused on post-school goals, self-determination, and help to coordinate school plans with relevant community agencies;  Instruction in academic, vocational, independent living, and personal-social skills, and help to stay in and complete school;

42 More on YTP Students receive: ► Job training while in the program, and assistance to secure employment or enter post-secondary education/training upon leaving the program; and ► Follow-up support for up to 12 months after leaving the program to help negotiate the uncertainties of the transition years.

43 Vocational Rehabilitation Assists Oregonians with disabilities to achieve and maintain employment and independence. Services can include:  Vocational Counseling and Guidance  Evaluation  Assistive Technology  Worksite Accommodations  Vocational and other Training Services  Information and Referral  Training and Education  Special Tools and Work Clothes

44 Vocational Rehabilitation ► Services are time-limited ► Plan for on-going support ► IPE– Individual Plan for Employment  Oregon Commission for the Blind

45 Vocational Rehabilitation ► Occupational Skills Training  Partnership between Community Colleges and Vocational Rehabilitation  Can Be a Follow-on to the YTP in High School.  Combines Academic Classes, Pre-Employment Classes and On-the- Job Training in Student’s Career Choice  One Year Certificate Program

46 Social Security Work Incentives 1. Earned Income Inclusion: After earning $65, an individual’s SSI check is reduced by only one dollar for every two dollars earned.

47 Social Security Work Incentives 2. Student Earned Income Exclusion: A student under the age of 22 can earn up to $400/month but less than $1620/year before a reduction in benefits occurs.

48 Social Security Work Incentives 3. Impairment-Related Work Expenses (IRWE): May deduct the cost of disability related items and services needed from the earned income used to calculate SSI or SSDI payments.

49 Social Security Work Incentives 4. Plan for Achieving Self-Support (PASS): A plan to set aside income in order to achieve an occupational goal. The funds set aside are not counted when calculating SSI benefits. A PASS must include the following: Pre-approval in writing from the Social Security Administration Pre-approval in writing from the Social Security Administration A realistic and specific work goal A realistic and specific work goal All details surrounding the proposed timeline and set aside income All details surrounding the proposed timeline and set aside income

50 Social Security Work Incentives: 5. Ticket to Work The person gets a “ticket” that they use to obtain services to help them find and keep a job. The ticket allows the person to choose their own employment service provider, called employment network  Anyone can become an employment network  The Employment Network is only paid for successful outcomes

51 Employer Incentives ► Deduction for costs of removing barriers to the disabled and the elderly—This is a deduction a business can take for making a facility or public transportation vehicle more accessible to and usable by persons who are disabled or elderly. See chapter 8 in Publication 535, Business Expenses. ► Disabled access credit—This is a nonrefundable tax credit for an eligible small business that pays or incurs expenses to provide access to persons with disabilities. The expenses must be to enable the eligible small business to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act of See the instructions for Form 8826, Disabled Access Credit, for more information.

52 One-Stop Workforce Investment Act (WIA) One-Stops are places with a wide variety of agencies and programs in the same building. Two programs that might be helpful in pursuing employment ► Summer Youth Employment ► Individual Training Accounts

53 DD (Developmental Disability) Services ► For those who qualify, funding and assistance are available.  Self Directed Supports ► Personal Agent helps develop a support plan for the individual  Comprehensive Services ► For those who need 24 hour services ► Includes residential and day treatment services

54 Brokerages ► ► Support Services System: This level of service provides supports for portions of the day. A person may be living in his or her own home or the family home. The individual makes decisions and a Personal Agent/Brokerage assists in guiding the person. ► ► Support Services Are: Access to a Personal Agent to help plan for needs and secure resources to meet them. Planning based on self-determination Access to some resources to implement the plan Targeted funds through support services for persons with DD

55 Apprenticeship  Apprenticeship is occupational training that combines on-the-job experience with classroom training.  Industry and individual employers design and control the training programs, and may pay apprentices' wages.

56 Leveraging Resources ► Having a plan, and knowing where you can get services and support, will help you encourage others to support you in your dream. ► Letting the team know about commitments from others can help assure them to invest as well.

57 Employment Resources ► DHS  Seniors and People with Disabilities  Office of Vocational Rehabilitation ► ►

58 For More Information ► ODE –www.ode.state.or.us ► x2335  Jackie Burr ► ORPTI - ►


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