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Rights Respecting Schools: Workshop Series. Workshop 1 Children’s Rights and Education.

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Presentation on theme: "Rights Respecting Schools: Workshop Series. Workshop 1 Children’s Rights and Education."— Presentation transcript:

1 Rights Respecting Schools: Workshop Series

2 Workshop 1 Children’s Rights and Education

3 Welcome Please find materials at your table to create a name plate. Thank you for helping me to learn your names. Then take a minute to fill in the Five-Minute Reflection.

4 Congratulations! Congratulations for the commitment your school has made to children’s rights and rights respecting education through your enthusiasm for the Rights Respecting Schools initiative. Let’s get learning!

5 Impacts of Rights Respecting Education FOR STUDENTS Improved self-esteem and well-being Improved relationships and behaviour Improved engagement in learning Positive attitudes towards diversity in society Reduction in prejudice Enhanced moral understanding Support for global justice “When you are talking people listen to you and they don’t interrupt. They give you the right to speak up.” Daniella, Grade 5, Cape Horn

6 Workshop 1: Children’s Rights and Education AGENDA Introductions Where are we? Five-Minute Reflection Activity 1: Human and Children’s Rights Activity 2: Clustering Rights Activity 3: Defining Rights Respecting Education Activity 4: The Rights Respecting Schools Initiative

7 Rights Respecting Schools Rights Respecting Schools use the Convention on the Rights of the Child as a framework for educational improvement that aims to transform the whole learning environment with a consistent, rights-based approach. Cape Horn Elementary School Canada’s First Rights Respecting School

8 The Ultimate Outcome Educational policies, practices and decisions are all made in the best interest of the child Children’s rights are fulfilled and protected in Canadian schools

9 Where have we been? School makes a commitment to become an RRS

10 Where have we been? Children’s Rights Team is formed

11 Where have we been? School conducts the Initial Rights Assessment -Admin Survey -Student Focus Groups -Student Workshops -Staff Survey

12 Where are we now? Staff and parents undergo professional development training -5 workshops

13 Workshop Series Five Professional Development Workshops: Workshop 1: Children’s Rights and Education Workshop 2: Building Awareness Workshop 3: Meaningful Student Participation Workshop 4: Teaching and Learning Through a Rights Lens Workshop 5: Leadership for a Rights Respecting School

14 The Cycle of Learning

15 Where are we headed? Children’s Rights Team develops the RRS Action Plan

16 Where are we headed? School implements the RRS Action Plan

17 Where are we headed? School repeats the Admin Survey, Student Focus Groups, Staff Survey

18 Five-Minute Reflection INSTRUCTIONS Reflect silently on the following four questions: What do I know about children’s rights? From where did I gain my understanding of children’s rights? How have aspects of my identity and position in society (locally, nationally, globally) shaped my understanding of children’s rights? How has my life experience shaped my understanding of children’s rights? Jot down any thoughts you want to remember.

19 Statements about Human Rights Agree – Thumb Up Somewhat Agree – Thumb Sideways Disagree – Thumb Down Don’t Know – Closed Fist

20 Statements about Human Rights 1. Not everyone has equal rights. 2. Every person can claim his or her rights. 3. Some rights are more important than others. 4. Human rights can be taken away. 5. Every human right contributes to a person’s dignity.

21 Principles of Human Rights STATEMENT 1 Not everyone has equal rights. Every human is born with the same rights – human beings are equal and so are rights. Everyone everywhere has human rights – human rights are universal. No one can be denied his or her rights because of factors such as age, religion, sex, ethnic background, etc. - human rights are non-discriminatory.

22 Principles of Human Rights STATEMENT 2 Every person can claim his or her rights. Anyone can claim her or his rights, so long as in doing so they do not infringe or restrict the rights of others. In the process of claiming their rights, all people have the right to participate in and access the information and decision-making processes that affect their lives and well- being.

23 Principles of Human Rights STATEMENT 3 Some rights are more important than others. Human rights are interdependent and interrelated meaning that the fulfillment of one right often depends, wholly or in part, upon the fulfillment of others. In order for all human rights to be upheld, no one right can be deemed more important than another.

24 Principles of Human Rights STATEMENT 4 Human rights can be taken away. All people everywhere are entitled to their rights. These rights cannot be taken away any more than a human cannot stop being human. Human rights are inalienable.

25 Principles of Human Rights STATEMENT 5 Every human right contributes to a person’s dignity. Each and every right has been deemed equally important for the full realization of a person’s dignity. Human rights are indivisible. No one right can be denied or compromised to uphold another.

26 What are children’s rights? Children (all people under the age of 18) have the same human rights as adults. But they require special care and protection that adults do not. Children’s rights are laid out in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.

27 The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (the Convention) Rights to survival, development (physical and mental), protection, and participation Drafted in 1978 and adopted November 1989 Canada ratified in 1991 Most widely ratified human rights treaty Monitored by the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child

28 The Story of Children’s Rights

29 Clustering Rights Activity Organize the articles of the Convention so that articles that are similar or have commonalities are in the same ‘cluster’ Give each cluster a ‘name’

30 Types of Rights Survival Rights Right to life and to have your most basic needs met (for example: shelter, nutrition, medical treatment). Development Rights Rights that allow you to reach your fullest potential (for example: education, play and leisure, cultural activities). Participation Rights Rights that allow you to take an active role in your community (for example: the freedom to express opinions, to join associations). Protection Rights Rights that protect you from all forms of abuse, neglect and exploitation (for example: protection against involvement in armed conflict and child labour).

31 Simplify for Young Children Survival Rights – Be Healthy Development Rights – Be Yourself Participation Rights – Be Heard Protection Rights – Be Safe

32 A Life Like Mine

33 Why teach children about rights? It is their right to know their rights – Article 42 We have a responsibility as educators to teach children about their rights To further the values of children’s rights When children learn about their rights they become more aware of the importance of respect, cooperation, inclusion and responsibility Children’s rights values provide a consistent framework The consistent values framework of children’s rights helps children choose appropriate behaviour Children become more involved Children look outside themselves to others

34 Why in Canadian Schools? Legal Obligation Article 42 Promote and protect children’s rights Protecting the Vulnerable and Marginalized Canada ranks 11.8/21 on Child Well-Being Inequity Empowering a Generation of Active Global Citizens Rights and responsibilities Global Connections

35 Why in Canadian Schools?

36 Approaches to Children’s Rights Education Approaches AChildren are taught the roles and responsibilities they will gain as adults which neglects to treat children as right-bearers and citizens. BGrudgingly recognizes the rights of children and makes the assumption children are not able to understand and practice these rights. Children are taught of the rights outlined in the Convention but these rights are not recognized or respected in their school. CFocuses on issues such as how fortunate children are to have the Convention’s rights and protection and does little to impact attitudes and behaviour of children. DStudents are taught about developing countries as places that abuse the rights of children and that there is a Convention to protect the rights of those children, but that it fails. EThe Convention is taken into consideration through both pedagogical approaches and content. Students are engaged in the process of democratic learning and participation. Children’s rights are not only taught but respected, recognized and modeled. Source: Covell, K., and Howe, B. Empowering Children: Children’s Rights Education as a Pathway to Citizenship, Toronto: University of Toronto Press Incorporated (2005), 13.

37 Defining Rights Respecting Education TermsDefinitions “Not Yet”Children are taught the roles and responsibilities they will gain as adults which neglects to treat children as right-bearers and citizens. “Constrained Rights” Education Grudgingly recognizes the rights of children and makes the assumption children are not able to understand and practice these rights. Children are taught of the rights outlined in the Convention but these rights are not recognized or respected in their school. “Limited Rights” Education Focuses on issues such as how fortunate children are to have the Convention’s rights and protection and does little to impact attitudes and behaviour of children. “Rights Violation” Education Students are taught about developing countries as places that abuse the rights of children and that there is a Convention to protect the rights of those children, but that it fails. “Full-Blown” or “Rights Respecting” Education The Convention is taken into consideration through both pedagogical approaches and content. Students are engaged in the process of democratic learning and participation. Children’s rights are not only taught but respected, recognized and modeled.

38 Schools Protect and Uphold Children’s Rights For this activity you only need to refer to the following 14 articles: 2, 3, 12, 14, 15, 16, 19, 23, 24, 28, 29, 30, 31, 42

39 Rights Respecting School Building Blocks

40 RRS Action Plan Rights Respecting Schools Action Plan (Template) Roadmap school uses to build rights respecting capacities of the school community RRS Action Plan Template designed around RRS Building Blocks / Benchmarks Development started during Workshops 2-5 Children’s Rights Team completes the RRS Action Plan in Step 5: Make a Plan

41 Take-Away Resources – Staff & Parents Children’s Rights and Responsibilities: The Convention in Child-Friendly Language Can be used to explain rights and the Convention to children Children’s Rights At Your School Can be used to explain rights and the Convention to children Activity ideas to do at school and home to help children learn about their rights

42 Additional Resource for Teachers Creating a Rights Respecting Classroom: Engaging Activities and Tools for Grades Kindergarten to Eight Available as PDF of activities by grade Includes pedagogical approaches, strategies and tips Engaging, hands-on and teacher-tested Available for download from: rightsrespectingschools.ca Use the password rrs123 to access under the ‘School Resources‘ section of the website

43 Congratulations! Contact info:


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