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Kansas Kindergarten Readiness Screener Pilot

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Presentation on theme: "Kansas Kindergarten Readiness Screener Pilot"— Presentation transcript:

1 Kansas Kindergarten Readiness Screener Pilot 2016-17
Kindergarten Readiness and the Ages & Stages Questionnaires Kansas Kindergarten Readiness Screener Pilot Welcome and Introductions House keeping items Training materials needed: Copies of the ASQ-3 60 and 72 month forms Copies of the ASQ:SE 2 60 month form May want post it notes, note pads, pens. These are optional. You will also need internet access and speakers to view the videos. The video files are too large to download, so internet access is required.

2 Agenda for the Day Why Kindergarten Readiness?
ASQ:3 Ages and Stages Questionnaire Lunch ASQ:SE-2 Ages and Stages Questionnaire: Social Emotional Online Access Webinar by Brooke Publishing You may need to modify this agenda for your specific meeting.

3 Kindergarten Readiness
Dr. Randy Watson, Commissioner of Education https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7rd5kJ3bnPM Dr. Watson sets the stage and gives an overview of where we’re heading regarding Kindergarten Readiness in Kansas. Highlight takeaways from the video: The largest gap is at Kindergarten Kindergarten Readiness screener for all districts Accurate and comparable data Where do we put resources to support early learning in Kansas?

4 Kindergarten Readiness Workgroup
Amy Blosser, Early Childhood Director, Children’s Cabinet and Trust Fund Barbara Dayal, Preschool and Special Education, KSDE Julie Ewing, English Learners & Title III, KSDE Emily Fleming, KCK ECC Assistant Principal, KCK Public Schools Beth Fultz, Career Standards and Assessments, KSDE Tracie Kalic, Migrant Education GOSOSY Director Kim Kennedy, Head Start Collaboration Office, DCF Barbara Kramer, Part C Program Analyst, KDHE Richard Matteson, Requirements Analyst, KSDE Shawna McAllister, Kindergarten Teacher, Canton-Galva Elementary Tammy Mitchell, Kindergarten Readiness & School Improvement, KSDE Monica Murnan, Director of Student Support Services, Greenbush Tony Moss, Research and Evaluation, KSDE Chelie Nelson, Kansas MTSS Janet Newton, Parents as Teachers, KSDE Vera Stroup-Rentier, Early Childhood, Special Education, and Title, KSDE, Chair Cross state-agency and programs work group was put together in early 2016 to take the charge from the state board of education and make decisions regarding what kind of “screener” should be piloted. Selecting this tool was not just a KSDE decision, it was made by this group of stakeholders.

5 Kansas’ Current Landscape in Getting Kids Ready for Kindergarten
Existing Work in Early Childhood School Readiness Framework Early Learning Standards Family Engagement Standards The workgroup reviewed the existing work in early childhood. Kansas has a long history of providing high quality early childhood services across the state. Work has been completed in the last several years on the School Readiness Framework, which lays the foundation for our definition of Kindergarten Readiness, as well the Kansas Early Learning Standards and Family Engagement Standards. These pieces of information link to efforts for students K through Post-Secondary so that we have a seamless system of programs serving children birth through age 21. An existing stakeholder group will inform the work, the Early Childhood Agencies Leadership team. In addition, the Kindergarten Readiness Workgroup, comprised of agency staff, early childhood leaders, kindergarten teachers and school administration.

6 Questions Considered What are districts currently using?
What are other states using? Do we want to build our own? What information do we want to collect? Questions considered by the workgroup. Districts were all over the board regarding what they were using, and many didn’t have anything in place district-wide. A few other states have Kindergarten entry exams that are very comprehensive and time consuming to administer. Building our own really wasn’t a consideration given our time frame. We definitely wanted to look at multiple domains, including cognition and social-emotional development.

7 Key Ideas Kindergarten Readiness
Measuring kindergarten readiness provides a snapshot of where children are upon entry to kindergarten. Kindergarten readiness screening will include communication (language & literacy), problem solving, motor, and social emotional areas of development. Families and caregivers will be engaged in gathering information about their child’s development and early childhood experiences prior to kindergarten. Key ideas agreed upon by the workgroup.

8 A Kindergarten Readiness Screener
A Hinge – Not a Gate Swings back to inform regarding prior experiences Swings forward to inform effective classroom practices Informs Communities regarding early childhood opportunities Not a gate keeper to “screen” five year olds out of Kindergarten The workgroup decided upon a screener because that was the direction given and reiterated in the Commissioner’s video. The workgroup decided upon a developmental screener because: It measures where a child is, regardless of what “curriculum” they’ve experienced. It doesn’t penalize children who have not been involved in formal preschool. It provides a snapshot of their readiness to learn in a more formal setting. It could signal that more assessment or evaluation is warranted (health concerns, special education concerns).

9 Kindergarten Readiness Screener Timeline
June 2016 Participants in the fall 2016 pilot will be determined August 2016 Small team Trainer of Trainers receive official training September 2016 Every Kindergarten teacher involved in pilot will be trained by the training team September – December 2016 **ASQ-3 and ASQ:SE-2 will be piloted in various districts and schools across Kansas Winter 2017 Pilot cohort will provide feedback to KSDE to help inform planning of a state-wide roll out of a Kindergarten Readiness screening tool RFP process for state-wide screening tool Develop training plan *Spring/Summer/Fall 2017 Implement training plan *Fall 2017 State-wide data collection begins Approximately 37,000 Kindergarten children, their families, and teachers will collect information using the approved screening tool Explain that we are piloting Ages and Stages, but when it comes to a state wide roll out, we will put it out for an RFP (Request for Proposal) so that other vendors who have products that can meet the specifications can bid for the business. This is a state law. Also, all materials provided to schools for this pilot are theirs to keep. **For the purpose of the pilot, we are test driving the instruments, so teachers have the first semester to try out the ASQ features. This is also due to the timing of contracting with Brooke publishing and ordering materials. We realize this will not give us Kindergarten readiness data for this year. Moving forward, if this tool is selected, the requirements for beginning of the year data collection will be in place.

10 Districts Participating in 2016 Pilot

11 Beyond the Pilot Spring 2017
Survey and meet with focus group of pilot participants to collect feedback and recommendations A Request for Proposal will be initiated (as per state law) for a screening tool Work with the approved vendor on a training plan Work with KSDE on a funding plan Begin state-wide data collection Explain that while we are piloting Ages and Stages Questionnaires, we will need to go through a process where other vendors with products that meet our specifications make requests for the business. This is a state law

12 Beyond the Pilot Questions to address in the future:
What does the data show regarding the readiness of children entering Kindergarten? What are the implications for communities and schools? What are the implications for distribution of resources? What are the implications for needed professional learning?

13 Looks at developmental milestones Largely observational in nature
A Screener is Not a Test Screening Tool Looks at developmental milestones Provides a snapshot Brief to administer Largely observational in nature Not a test, not an assessment.

14 Ages and Stages Questionnaires
Ages and Stages Questionnaires have been used by pediatricians, caregivers, health department, social workers and early childhood providers. It is proven valid and reliable. THE QUESTIONNAIRES ARE COMPLETED BY PARENTS, OR IN PARTNERSHIP WITH PARENTS. Research shows that parents are accurate reporters of their child’s development 94% of the time. ASQ-3 and ASQ:SE-2 are proven to be highly valid and reliable. More informaiton regarding validity and reliability can be found at agesandstages.com

15 Ages and Stages Questionnaires Are...
Considerations Used during regular home and/or classroom activities Based on families’/teachers’ observations of children’s skills and abilities Addresses communication, motor, problem solving, personal and social-emotional skills Aligns with tools already used in early childhood settings The Kindergarten Readiness workgroup decided upon the four bullet points on this slide,

16 Parent Report: Research
Parent’s are highly reliable when reporting on their child's development (Dinnebeil & Rule 1994) ASQ-3 research found 93% agreement between parents and professionals Many other studies agree that parents are reliable reporters Parents ARE the experts on their child! Review Slide. References: Dinnebeil, L.A. & Rule, S. (1994) reviewed 23 studies and reported high reliability in parents’ report Dinnebeil, L.A. & Rule, S. (1994). Congruence between parents' and professionals' judgments about the development of young children with disabilities: A review of the literature. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education. 14 (1),1-25. Other Studies: Bodnarchuk, J.L. & Eaton, W.O. (2004). Can parent reports be trusted? Validity of daily checklists of gross motor milestone attainment. Applied Developmental Psychology, 25,   Diamond, K. E.; le Furgy, W.G. Screening for developmental handicaps: Outcomes from an early childhood screening program. [Journal; Peer-Reviewed Status-Unknown] Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics. Vol 8(1) 1988, Glascoe, F.P. (1999). Using parents’ concerns to detect and address developmental and behavioral problems. J Soc Pediatr Nurs Jan-Mar;4(1):24-35. Mulhern, S.; Dworkin, P.H.; Bernstein, B. Do parental concerns predict a diagnosis of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder? [Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal] Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics. Vol 15(5) Oct 1994, Ring, E.D. & Fenson, L. (2000) The correspondence between parent report and child performance for receptive and expressive vocabulary beyond infancy. First Language, 20 (59) ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

17 Why Engage Families? The family is the primary force in preparing children for school and life (Henderson & Berla, 1995) Children benefit when all the adults who care for them work together (Bronfenbrenner, 2004) The child’s interactions with caregivers and functional capacities are critical elements of an evaluation. Screening, assessment, and evaluation should be conducted in natural, non-threatening settings and involve tasks that are relevant to the child and family. Children will demonstrate their true capacities when they are in a place that is secure and familiar, and with people whom they know and trust. Infants and young children may be particularly sensitive to unfamiliar caregivers and separation from trusted adults. In addition, the activities and materials should reflect the kinds of experiences and objects that are relevant to their daily life. Henderson, A.T. & Berla, N. (Ed) (1995)  A New Generation of Evidence: The National Committee for Citizens in Education retrieved 6/14/2015 from ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

18 Parents and Family Members Bring:
Child’s temperament; health history; behavior; emerging skills Family expectations; fears and hopes Culturally-specific beliefs about child-rearing Parents experiences with school Parents beliefs about role with professionals Parents sense of control and authority What do these different people bring to the overall picture of the child’s development? Parents and family members bring; The child’s temperament, their health history, and behavior in the home. They bring expectations, fears and hopes about their children. Family members bring their cultural perspective—an important consideration in determining how to screen, what information means, and what next steps are appropriate. Parents bring their personal experiences of school and their beliefs about their role in relation to professionals. And finally, parent’s bring their sense of control and authority about their young children. Source: The National Center on Parent, Family and Community Engagement

19 Providers/Professionals Bring:
Child educational, behavioral or health information Personal observations and assessments of child Knowledge about resources & future educational environments Personality, family history/ culture and professional culture Training, experience, philosophy On the other hand, providers also bring important things to the screening process, such as: A child’s educational, behavioral and health information, and personal observations and assessments of a child in their environment—for example in a classroom. Providers bring knowledge about resources & upcoming educational environments—for example, what will the expectations be for a 5-year-old entering kindergarten in your community? This is important information to share with parents so they can make informed decisions about next steps. Providers bring their own personality, history & culture that will influence how they think about development. Providers bring their own professional training, experiences and philosophy Source: The National Center on Parent, Family and Community Engagement

20 Differences in Parent &
Professional Report Research Indicates: Professionals may underestimate a child’s skills Higher agreement for easily observed behaviors Parents report more emerging skills Children do different things in different settings Review Slide and State: Professionals often worry about parents being in denial or over-estimating their child’s skills. However, errors in reporting go both directions. Professionals also underestimate a child’s skills! Think of a 5 year old child. What happens when someone they do not know well tries to talk to them, approach them, ask them direct questions? ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

21 Parental Characteristics that may Affect Accuracy
Low literacy Cultural and language differences Impaired mental functioning Mental health issues Involvement with child protective agencies Parents with these characteristics will need different levels of support. Review Slide and State: This does not mean that parent’s with these characteristics can not use the ASQ, it means that the method for completing the questionnaires (e.g., mail-out, home visit), the support provided to the parent during the process. Examples Parents with a low literacy level or a cognitive delay will need support reading and/or interpreting items. Providers may need to consider translation/interpretation supports for parents that speak other languages. Providers will have to develop a strong level of trust with parents that may have had previous experiences with systems that have been negative (e.g., child welfare, special education). ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

22 Using Parent Completed Tools
Creates the expectation that parents will be involved Conveys the value for and importance of the parent’s expertise The expectation is important for staff and families alike.  True collaboration involves the reciprocal sharing of information between parents and providers ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

23 Collecting ASQ/ASQ:SE Data
Explain the purpose of the questionnaires and the importance of their participation at a parent night event, hand out the forms (or online access information) and give parents a deadline for completion. Have a parent night or pre-conference where you talk with parents and ask the questions on the forms to get to know the parents and child. Utilize school counselor/social worker to collect questionnaires from parents who may need additional support 1. Provide written overview letter to parents about the pilot and post to social media 2. Utilize the school counselor/social worker to collect questionnaires from parents who may need additional support. 3. Set up a time to call parents and use an interview to gather rating that the teacher enters into the database. There were some really good ideas generated in the discussions last week, so this could be a good opportunity for them to brainstorm and share possibilities.

24 Activity: Be Aware of Your Thoughts
Children who come to school dirty are…. Parents who smoke are… Parents who sleep with their kids… Parents who ‘do’ for their children all the time… Families who don’t read to their kids are… Children who don’t look adults in the eye… Dads who don’t support their families are… Children who are overweight are… Angry, distrustful family members are… ACTIVITY: Don’t write or discuss with another person, just listen and think… The point of this activity is to be aware of your thoughts. In your mind fill in the end of each sentence as the Presenter reads each statement out loud. Be aware of the FIRST thing that comes to your mind before you begin to self correct. These thoughts are our cultural baggage, stereotypes, prejudices, misunderstandings, etc. If we can be aware of it, stop it, and reframe it, we are on the road to becoming more culturally competent. ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

25 Features of the Have participants take out their 60-month ASQ-3 Questionnaire while reviewing features of ASQ-3. The next few slides just walk people through what’s on the form. These should go pretty fast. ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

26 Features: ASQ-3 Cover Page
Administration window indicated on ASQ-3 cover page 60 month "window" is for children ages 57 months 0 days through 66 months 0 days 72 month “window” covers 66 months 1 day to 77 months 30 days. Add talking points regarding 72 month form. Note: If a child’s score is questionable and his age is on the younger or older end of these stretched windows, this should to be taken into consideration. ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

27 Features: ASQ-3 Cover Page Gathers information to choose correct ASQ-3 interval
Date ASQ Completed Child’s Date of Birth Compare with Administration window Choosing the correct ASQ-3 Questionnaire interval is one of the major challenges to the ASQ system. Program staff should use the form that is appropriate for the child’s age (in months). There’s an easy calculator for this at This online tool is great for determining a child’s age in months and days. ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

28 Online Calculator Enter Date of Completion and Date of Birth for correct interval to use. The Age Calculator found on will provide the most accurate age for selecting the correct questionnaire by age interval. Download ASQ Calculator App on phone or tablet

29 Features of the ASQ-3 “Important Points to Remember” are critical to increased accuracy of the ASQ. They are designed to address common discrepancies between parents’ and professionals’ report of child development. Accuracy is improved when a familiar caregiver reports on observable behaviors in a familiar, comfortable environment over time, when a child is well fed, rested and healthy, and when the caregiver tries out questions that they are not sure of. This also increases the educational impact of the tool. ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

30 Features of the ASQ-3 ASQ-3 is organized with: 5 developmental areas
6 questions in each area Response options: Yes, Sometimes, Not Yet Forms are written at a 4th to 6th grade reading level. Point out these features as participants walk through the 60 month form.

31 Features of the ASQ-3 Questions ordered in a hierarchy
Questions #5 and #6 are average skills for child of that age (i.e., a 60-month skill for a 60-month child) If a child received a yes on every question in the ASQ, what can we say about that child’s development? That the child is typically developing, right at age level only. State "If a child received a yes on every question in the ASQ, what can we say about that child’s development?" Answer: That the child is typically developing, right at age level only.

32 Preparations to Consider
Determine level of assistance needed, if any (first language, reading level, motivation, capability) Explain purpose of the pilot, screening and review questionnaire content Schedule time to talk with the parent Select correct ASQ-3 interval If possible, provide parent with ASQ-3 prior to having them complete it electronically Assemble materials, if assisting parents with completion Review slide. ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

33 ASQ-3 Recommendations for Follow-up
Consider the following Total ASQ-3 Area Scores Parent Concerns Local procedures If based on multiple data points you are concerned, the child may have a delay.. Follow your school’s SIT process/protocol Look at the classroom report sample. What questions do you have as a classroom teacher? What will you need to do to make your classroom meet the needs of this class?

34 ASQ-3 Other Contributing Factors
How might culture or values influence these activities? Feeding and Dressing Reading and Writing Tools Playing with Toys Blocks, stuffed animals, shopping carts Sports (e.g., balls) These are all activities/materials you will find on the ASQ. Discuss how cultural values and parenting practices may impact a child’s performance on these different activities. Examples of issues that may arise: Feeding/Dressing: Some cultures feed and dress their babies much longer than "western" cultures and do not encourage self-feeding or children dressing themselves. Reading/Writing: Some cultures have strong oral traditions; writing may not be emphasized, especially at very young ages and may also be considered a safety issue. Playing with Toys: Some cultures place a high value on socializing and may not encourage solitary play with toys. Sports: Some cultures may have strong gender roles and not allow or encourage girls to participate in sport-type activities. Excerpts from: Cross-Cultural Lessons: Early Childhood Developmental Screening and Approaches to Research and Practice. Community-University Partnership for the Study of Children, Youth, and Families. Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. *Adapted from Cross-Cultural Lessons: Early Childhood Developmental Screening and Approaches to Research and Practice. CUP Partnership, Alberta Canada. ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

35 ASQ-3 Score Interpretation for the Classroom
This is what the report would look like formatted, or you can export into a spreadsheet Look at the data converted to Excel - Discussion questions: What do you notice? If this were your class, what could you do to be ready for these children? (Making a SpEd referral from this one data collection is NOT appropriate.) What do you do if you have concerns about a particular child? (Steer them away from making any referral decisions. Period. Remind them that this is one snapshot. One piece of data. If scores for a particular child look concerning, it is appropriate to watch that child over the next few weeks, offer in class support, and collect more information.

36 Discussing Results with all families…. What to tell parents?
Comment on all of the things the child can do really well (the “yes” responses). For the “sometimes” and “not yet” responses, simply tell the parent that you will be working with their child on those things. For the pilot, it isn’t necessary to discuss “scores” with parents. Give the parent corresponding learning activities to support the child at home. Remind them of the information in the Dear Parent letter from the Commissioner and thank them for participating in this important pilot data collection. This is a pilot within a pilot. We are piloting the ASQ overall, but we are also piloting the 72 month form for the University of Oregon. This means that there are no cut scores established for the 72 month form.

37 Follow-Up to Screening: Intervention and Learning Activities
Review Slide. ASQ Intervention Activities are found in Appendix F (pg. 201) of the ASQ-3 User’s Guide. They are in a chart format, and each age interval contains activities across developmental areas. **ASQ-3™ Learning Activities subscription is being provided to pilot sites. ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

38 Break Next on the agenda is the Ages and Stages Questionnaire 2: Social Emotional Put the break slide wherever you think it needs to go for your group.

39 ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

40 Why Screen Social-Emotional Behaviors?
ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

41 Early Childhood Mental Health
Video: Early Childhood Mental Health From Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University rief_series/inbrief_mental_health https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tLiP4b-TPCA The following video discusses early childhood mental health Another good video on brain architecture from The Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University (www.developingchild.harvard.edu) is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tLiP4b-TPCA There are many good short videos about the importance of social-emotional development, brain development, parent-child interaction and protective factors at the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University—also see Brain Hero videos ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

42 Complexities of Assessing Social-Emotional Development
ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

43 Social Emotional Development for Young Child is the Growing Capacity to Develop:
Ability to develop good relationships with peers and adults/make friends/get along with others Ability to persist at tasks Ability to follow directions Ability to identify, understand, and communicate own feelings/emotions Ability to constructively manage strong emotions Empathy

44 It needs to be viewed through 3 important lenses.
Challenge: Understanding Social-Emotional Development and Assessing it is Complex It needs to be viewed through 3 important lenses. Appropriateness of behaviors depends on: Child’s developmental age or stage. Context of setting Family and community values and expectations Understanding Social-Emotional Development and Assessing it is Complex It needs to be viewed through 3 important lenses: Appropriateness of behaviors depends on child’s developmental age or stage. Appropriateness is often tied to age expectations; that is, expectations for infants generally are far different from those of preschool-age children. The context of setting helps set the parameter of appropriateness. Acceptable behavior on the playground is different than acceptable behavior in a restaurant. Family and community values and expectations affect what others find appropriate. Some families and cultures find noisy active children acceptable, whereas others do not. Squires & Bricker: SEAM User’s Guide

45 Many Anti-Social Behaviors are Normal!
Challenge: Many Anti-Social Behaviors are Normal! Typically Early Kindergarten children may Whine, make demands, grab, push, hit. Pout or have a tantrum when they don’t get their way. Resist following directions. Behavioral experimentation helps children learn consequences, builds a working memory for future problem solving and regulate themselves! They are developing impulse control and executive functioning! The fact that antisocial behavior is normal is important to keep in mind. Children vary in activity level, mood, sociability, attention, control, and affect regulation. Examples: Head banging when frustrated. Cries with hunger but rejects foods, screams at a picture of an elephant, cries for mom, but rejects her approach, temper tantrums, making huge messes, toileting accidents, even typical sexual exploration can all be within normal limits. Self regulation in all children moves from external to internal. It is influenced by temperament and is linked to socialization. Self regulation needs to be taught by adults who are the child’s security base. So, children (and adults for that matter) will experiment with behaviors to learn what happens. Ultimately the child gains executive and impulse control and can do it on their own. Experimentation becomes problematic when the child is reinforced and the intensity and frequency becomes high. ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

46 Understanding the Characteristics of Problem Behaviors
Challenge: Understanding the Characteristics of Problem Behaviors 2 Crucial features Frequency Intensity of behaviors 2 Dimensions Externalizing Internalizing The questions are: “how frequent”, “how intense”, “how chronic”, “is there a pattern”, “what’s going on” in the social context? Externalizing problems are easier to observe and more intense than internalizing behaviors. Internalizing problems can be identified on the ASQ:SE-2, but scores may not be as high as with children with externalizing problems. ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

47 Social Emotional Challenges
Externalizing: Severe tantrums Kicking, hitting, biting Throwing toys and materials Difficulty accepting guidance Disregulation: Hard to recognize emotional state Shifts quickly to inconsolable crying Difficulty being calmed or calming self Difficulty with routines: Falling asleep, staying awake Feeding / Mealtime problems Internalizing: Withdrawn Unengaged with people or materials Sad, anxious, irritable

48 Features of the ASQ:SE-2
Have participants take out the ASQ:SE-2 60 month questionnaire. ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

49 What is ASQ:SE-2? Parent-completed questionnaires that accurately identify young children at risk for social or emotional difficulties 7 key behavioral areas: self-regulation, compliance, adaptive functioning, autonomy, affect, social-communication, and interaction with people ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

50 Areas of ASQ:SE-2 These "areas" are somewhat arbitrary but may help providers understand the organization of ASQ:SE-2 and the intent of individual questions. If you have a question about the intent of an item, you can refer to The ASQ:SE-2 User’s Guide to see how that item was categorized. Items are not evenly distributed across areas The number of items and content of items change over age intervals. ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

51 Features of ASQ:SE-2 All questionnaires are written at 4th- to 6th- grade reading level All questionnaires include open-ended questions related to: eating, sleeping, and toileting concerns Any additional worries What caregivers enjoy about their child Participants should have the ASQ:SE-2 6 month Questionnaire for review. Open-ended questions are not scored The open-ended questions on ASQ:SE-2, just like the Overall Section on ASQ-3, are very important. ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

52 Administration window indicated on ASQ:SE-2 cover page
18-month "window” for children ages 54 months 0 days through 72 months 0 days Programs can personalize the cover page by replacing the logo of the mother and child (on the top left) Many of these features are the same as the ASQ:3 ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

53 Family Information Page
Date ASQ:SE-2 Completed Child’s Date of Birth Prematurity question (up to 24 months) Calculate Age at administration or Adjusted age Compare with administration window Choosing the correct ASQ:SE-2 interval is one of the major challenges to the ASQ:SE system. Program staff should carefully calculate a child’s Age at Administration in months and days. See ASQ:SE-2 User’s Guide for detailed guidance. Use the Age Calculator at This online tool is great for determining a child’s age in months and days. Age Adjustments must be made when a child is born more than 3 weeks premature, up to but not including 24 months. How to calculate an adjusted age will be discussed again during the scoring exercise. ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

54 Participants should have the 60 Month ASQ:SE-2 Questionnaire before them for review.
The “Important Points to Remember” section on the top of the Questionnaire are important to review with parents. ASQSE-2 now has a scoring option “Often or Always” which replaces the former, “Most of the Time”. The “Check if this is a Concern” column now has scoring code “V” indicated (will discuss scoring codes during the scoring exercise). Line to right provides space to total each item, similar to the ASQ-3. ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

55 Features of ASQ:SE-2 that Support Cultural Sensitivity
Flexible administration Ability to reframe/omit items Balance of strengths as well as problem behaviors Subjectivity is a critical part of assessment data Adaptations in multiple languages Review Slide. ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

56 Choose the Correct ASQ-SE:2 for child’s age
Enter Date of Completion and Date of Birth for correct interval to use. The Age Calculator found on will provide the most accurate age for selecting the correct questionnaire by age interval. Download ASQ Calculator App

57 Introducing ASQ:SE-2 to Parents
Provides a quick check of your child’s social-emotional development Information you share is confidential Answers show your child’s social-emotional strengths and if there is information or resources in the community I may be able to share with you Reinforce the intent behind ASQ:SE-2—to help gather information regarding a child’s social-emotional development and behavior so that you can support the parent. Social-emotional competence is a strong predictor of school readiness and success. If you are introducing this tool to a parent face-to-face, be careful not to lead their answers to the questionnaire. If you are present, parents will ask you for your opinions, but try and let the parents know you want to know what they think. It is fine to debrief after the questionnaire is completed, but at first, let the parents complete independently. It is important that parents understand how the information gathered will be used. Some parents may have concerns about confidentiality issues. Establish trust. ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

58 Introducing ASQ:SE-2 to Parents
Often or Always Child is performing behavior too often or always Sometimes Child is performing behavior occasionally, but not consistently Rarely or Never Child is not or is rarely performing behavior Discuss the "concerns" option Emphasize for parents that the "rarely or never" option does allow for the behavior to be present, but that the parent would consider it a relatively rare occurrence or that it happens when the child is overly tired or sick. If an item can be predicted (for example, your baby smiles at you) then mark it as ”often or always", even if on rare occasion he does not. ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

59 Administering ASQ:SE-2
Have parents complete the questionnaires as independently as possible Some questions on ASQ:SE-2, such as those regarding eating problems (for all intervals) may require clarification Staff should not provide their opinion about how to answer the questionnaire. Staff should encourage the parent to provide his or her "best answer" based on his/her feelings about his/her child’s behavior. Staff should provide as little interpretation as possible, other than to help the parent understand what is being asked. There is guidance in the ASQ:SE-2 User’s Guide (see page 93 of the User’s Guide, the section titled "Parent Comments") related to these questions in terms of what types of behaviors would be of concern. Sometimes parents will indicate the presence of a behavior, but it actually is a typical behavior given the age of the child. For example, the question, "Does your child do things over and over and can’t seem to stop?" Examples are…(parents can write in an answer). Parents have written in things such as "wants to read the same book". After questioning the parent, you may realize this is just a typical child behavior, rather than a perseverative, or compulsive type, behavior. Staff need to use their professional judgment in these cases. ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

60 ASQ:SE-2 Omitted Item? Contact parent or omit item if inappropriate
1-2 Missing Items: adjusting the total score will not change results 3 Items missing: see ASQ:SE-2 User’s Guide or use the Adjusted Score Calculator (www.agesandstages.com) It is not recommended to omit more than 3 items It is recommended that no more than 3 items be omitted on any questionnaire interval in order to accurately interpret ASQ:SE-2 results. 1–2 missing items: If 1 or 2 items are missing, then proceed with the child’s total score. Adjusting the total score will not change the interpretation of the child’s score (i.e., the child’s adjusted total will still be above the cutoff, close to the cutoff in the monitoring zone, or below the cutoff). 3 missing items: If 3 items are missing and the total score of completed items is within 5 points of a cutoff, then adjusting the total score will change the child’s results (i.e., results will move from below the cutoff to the monitoring zone, or from the monitoring zone to above the cutoff). ASQ-3™ and ASQ:SE-2™ Training Materials by J Squires, J Farrell, J Clifford, S Yockelson, E Twombly, and L Potter Copyright © 2015 Brookes Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

61 Scoring ASQ-3 and ASQ:SE-2
Forms that are completed or entered online will be automatically scored. For the purposes of this pilot, this is preferred. If online recording is not possible, contact KSDE and a webinar on hand scoring will be provided.

62 Logistics Administration Window - For Pilot Only
Pilot participants have until December 31 to collect information on Kindergarten students using the appropriate age tool and enter the information online. This is to try out the tools, familiarize yourself with online features, collect information from parents. Because of the limitations of the time frame, we aren’t collecting Kindergarten entry data for the pilot. During state-wide data collection, this time frame will be much different.

63 Logistics Preview the Dear Teacher letter from Dr. Watson
Preview the Dear Parent letter from KSDE, including the parent consent portion Teachers should collect the parent consent ortions of the Dear Parent letter for future reference. KSDE will not collect this information from pilot sites.

64 FAQ’s Who should complete the ASQ’s?
A parent or primary caregiver should complete the ASQ’s. If the parent completes a paper version and the teacher disagrees, what should the teacher do? For the pilot, record what the parent completes. This could be a topic for future discussion during the pilot feedback process. If the parent doesn’t/won’t complete the ASQ, what should happen? If the parent consented, offer support to the parent, complete it together in an interview format.

65 FAQ’s What happens if the return rate from parents is low?
Consider alternate methods for connecting with parents to support them in completing the questionnaires. Do we have to share results with parents? This is a local decision, however parents who have completed similar forms in early childhood programs will expect to hear about the results. If the child completed an ASQ in the spring of their preschool year, should another one be completed? Yes.

66 FAQ’s Should a child with an IEP be screened?
Collaborate with your Special Education teacher and pertinent support staff to determine if having a parent complete the ASQ’s is appropriate. If it can be a positive, relationship building experience for the parent and teacher, then it should be considered Depending on the nature of the disability. If the ASQ process can be a positive, relationship building experience for the parent and teacher, then it should be considered. If it is going to cause the parent stress, or if it’s evident by the IEP that the child is significantly developmentally lower than the content of these forms, then it’s probably not appropriate. Defer to the guidance from your local team.

67 In Summary The largest gap in student achievement is at Kindergarten.
If we can strengthen early childhood experiences for all children, we can begin to close that gap. We need accurate and comparable data to answer the question, “Where do we put resources to support early learning in Kansas?” We believe ASQ can provide the accurate and comparable data needed by the state and provide useful information to teachers to help them support all children who arrive at Kindergarten.

68 In Summary This screening tool is NOT to be used to keep children out of Kindergarten. Every child who is 5 years old by September 1 has a right to have a place in Kindergarten.

69 In Summary Work with your team or brainstorm with your group to create an action plan and timeline for your Kindergarten Readiness pilot work.

70 ASQ Online Brooke Publishing will provide a one hour webinar to train on the online access features provided for this pilot. Additional links to connect to the webinar will be provided.

71 Questions? Tammy Mitchell tmitchell@ksde.org 785.296.7929
Feel free to add your names and contact information to this slide.


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