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2010 Annual Business and Professions Study Report to Public Relations Institute of Australia © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 1.

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Presentation on theme: "2010 Annual Business and Professions Study Report to Public Relations Institute of Australia © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 2010 Annual Business and Professions Study Report to Public Relations Institute of Australia © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 1

2 Table of contents 1.Executive summary 2.Dashboard 3.Method 4.Respondent profile 5.Detailed results 5.1 Drivers of engagement 5.2 Performance benchmarking 5.3 Performance tracking 5.4 Performance by key demographics 5.5 Attraction of members 5.6 Likelihood of membership renewal 5.7 Performance on touchpoints 6.Verbatim comments 7.Beaton credentials in brief 2 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd

3 Note on confidentiality The Annual Business and Professions Study (ABPS) is made possible through collaboration and trust among participating organisations. As such, these organisations agree not to, in the public domain: – Quote comparative results arising from this report; – Disclose other participating associations’ results; or – Use the information in any way that may be construed as embarrassing to other associations. Written consent from Beaton is required for any use of the data or related information in the public domain. 3 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd

4 1.Executive summary © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 4

5 Executive Summary ‘Supporting the development of my knowledge and skills’ »The number 1 attribute in driving member engagement; »PRIA have improved significantly from 2009 on this attribute; and »Performance is still below the average for the benchmarked associations. ‘Providing access to information that will assist me to perform my role’ »The number 2 attribute in driving member engagement; »PRIA’s 3 rd best performing attribute – a key strength; »Performance on this attribute has improved significantly from 2009; and »Performance is still below the average for the benchmarked associations. ‘Helping me develop my career / improving my job prospects’ »The number 3 attribute in driving member engagement; »No significant improvements on this attribute from 2009; and »This attribute is performing on par with the benchmark set average. 5 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd

6 2.Dashboard © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 6

7 Dashboard – key results 7 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd    

8 Dashboard – selected key results by demographics 8 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Note:Significance testing is conducted between groups at a 95% (***), 90% (**) and 80% (*) confidence level where indicated.

9 3.Method © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd

10 Survey method The member survey for the Public Relations Institute of Australia (PRIA) was undertaken as part of the larger 2010 Annual Business and Professions Study (ABPS). Research was conducted in November 2009 via a web-based survey. Respondents received an individually addressed email invitation containing a unique password hyperlink to the survey. Response rate Email invitations were sent to 2,838 potential respondents supplied by PRIA. Of the 2,838 members emailed: – 150 of these email invitations bounced back (a list of these has been supplied separately); and – 310 completed surveys were received, yielding a response rate of 11.5%. – This compares to 281 completed surveys and a response rate of 10.6% in the 2009 ABPS. 10 Method © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd

11 Method 11 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 2010 ABPS participating associations

12 Significance testing – interpretation guidelines Significance testing in this report is used to indicate whether the differences between groups of interest are statistically valid. Significance tests are performed at a number of different levels: – 95% confidence level is marked with three asterisks (***); – 90% confidence level is marked with two asterisks (**); and – 80% confidence level is marked with one asterisk (*). A 95% confidence level means that if the study was repeated again with the same sample size, we would be 95% confident that there would be the same significant differences (i.e. we are 95% confident that the difference is real and not due to chance). Refer to performance benchmarking – interpretation guidelines and performance tracking – interpretation guidelines for more information. References to ‘Total’ In charts, total refers to the aggregate result for all benchmarked associations, excluding PRIA. 12 Method © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd

13 PRIA’s benchmark set 13 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd

14 4.Respondent profile © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 14

15 Sample vs. population The 2010 ABPS sample did not matched the Public Relations Institute of Australia (“PRIA”) member population in location and gender. The results in this report should be evaluated with this in mind. Chapter summary – Respondent profile © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 15 PRIA Member Profile – Slightly under half (48%) were based across NSW and Vic, with 20, 15 and 7% in Qld, WA and SA respectively. – The majority of PRIA’s members were female (71%). – 42% were above the age of 40. – There is some degree of loyalty to the association – 56% have been members of PRIA for between 1 and 10 years; substantially, 24% have been members for more than 10 years. – For members, only 37% indicated that their organisation paid for membership fees in full, 60% indicated that they pay the full fee themselves. – Media, public relations, entertainment, culture & recreation along with State or territory government and Education and training featured most frequently in the PRIA’s industry profile.

16 In market research, it is rare for an entire population to be surveyed for two reasons: 1. the cost is too high; and 2. the population is dynamic (i.e. many of the individuals may be unwilling to participate or impossible to contact). Sampling is part of statistical practice concerned with the selection of individual observations intended to yield some knowledge about a population of interest. It is a statistical technique that is widely used for gathering information about a population. While the ABPS generally seeks to be inclusive of associations’ entire member populations, the final data is based on a sample of members from each association because the population is dynamic as described above. When reviewing data from a survey sample, the sample must be representative of the underlying target population in order for accurate inferences to be drawn about that population. Significant differences between a sample and the underlying population can lead to biased estimates of population parameters. 16 Mapping the survey sample to PRIA’s member population © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd

17 The following chapter provides demographic information on PRIA’s survey sample (i.e. the respondent profile) mapped against the total member population (based on population data supplied by PRIA), including significance testing, for: – primary place of work; – gender; and – age. This enables the evaluation of the representativeness of the survey sample. In addition, this chapter contains respondent profile data for other demographic variables for which population data was not available. If the survey sample is not representative of the total member population, there are two important considerations for interpretation of survey results: 1.the effects of any differences can be mitigated by weighting the data if population benchmarks are available. This option can be discussed with Beaton directly if this is of interest; or 2.results can be interpreted in the context of the respondent profile (i.e. the group of people who actually responded to the survey). 17 Mapping the survey sample to PRIA’s member population © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd

18 4.1 Primary place of work 18 Question:Where is your place of residency / study? Where is your office (primary place of work)? Base: Current members of PRIA © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd There is a significant difference between PRIA’s sample distribution and PRIA’s population distribution on ‘Primary place of work’ (at a 95% confidence level).

19 4.2 Gender 19 Question:Are you… ? Base: Current members of PRIA © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd There is no significant difference between PRIA’s sample distribution and PRIA’s population distribution on ‘Gender’ (at a 95% confidence level).

20 4.3 Age 20 Question:Which of the following age groups do you belong to? Base: Current members of PRIA © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd There is a significant difference between PRIA’s sample distribution and PRIA’s population distribution on ‘Age’ (at a 95% confidence level).

21 4.4 Duration of membership 21 Question:How long have you been a member (including students and affiliates where appropriate) of PRIA? Base: Current members of PRIA © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd

22 4.5 Industry 22 Question:Which of the following categories best describes the industry or main activity of the organisation you work for? Base: Current members of PRIA © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd

23 4.6 Position 23 Question:What is your current position? Base: Current members of PRIA © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd

24 4.7 Who pays membership fees? 24 Question:Which of the following statements best describes who currently pays the fees for your membership to PRIA? Base: Current members of PRIA © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd

25 4.8 Proportion of student members 25 Question:Is your membership considered a student membership by PRIA? Base: Current members of PRIA © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd

26 5.Detailed results © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 26

27 5.1Member engagement © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 27

28 PRIA performed lower than the benchmark set average on engagement (6.62 vs. 6.92), significantly above 2 and behind 7 benchmarked associations. The most important drivers of engagement for PRIA, in order of importance, are: Chapter summary – Member engagement 28 PRIA scored 6.38, significantly below the benchmark set average (6.80) and significantly above 3 and behind 6benchmarked associations. Supporting the development of my knowledge and skills 1. PRIA scored 6.52, below the benchmark set average (6.70) and significantly above 5 and behind 6 benchmarked associations. Providing access to information that will assist me to perform my role 2. PRIA scored 5.37, not significantly different from the benchmark set average (5.42) but significantly above 2 and behind 3 benchmarked associations. Helping me develop my career / improving my job prospects 3. © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Improvement priority based on performing below a mean of 6.5* *Note: a score of 6.5 represents the 75 th percentile of associations based on their average scores across all attributes Key strength based on performing above a mean of 6.5* Improvement priority based on performing below a mean of 6.5*

29 Member engagement Introduction This chapter introduces the concept of member ‘engagement’ (herein referred to as engagement). While engagement is a topic of considerable interest for professional associations, the concept is not well understood and has rarely been defined and / or measured in this context. Despite this, it is generally agreed that engagement is a prerequisite for a high performing professional association. As well as being advocates or ambassadors for their association, highly engaged members are likely to invest more time and money with their association in exchange for value and access to products and / or services and are likely to maintain their membership with the association in the long-term. This is why most associations strive to have highly engaged members. In response to this knowledge ‘gap’, the ABPS 2010 sought to: – A. Calculate an engagement index using a combination of theory and statistics to enable benchmarking and tracking of performance over time; – B. Identify significant drivers of engagement specific to each association to provide tactical information for improving member engagement; and – C. Review performance on the significant drivers of engagement to identify priorities for action. 29 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd

30 Member engagement A. Calculation of engagement index Step 1: Developing a conceptual framework for engagement. As member engagement is a multi-dimensional construct that cannot be measured directly via a single question, an initial ‘knowledge review’ (literature review and input from associations) of member engagement was undertaken during the questionnaire re- design phase. From this, a conceptual framework of engagement was developed encompassing a comprehensive list of measures that might explain engagement. These were included in the 2010 questionnaire and consisted of: – Overall performance; – Value; – Average performance on services accessed; – Propensity to recommend; – Likelihood of renewal; – Duration of membership; and – Potential to increase earning capacity. 30 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd A. Calculate an engagement index using a combination of theory and statistics to enable benchmarking and tracking of performance over time; B. Identify significant drivers of engagement specific to each association to provide tactical information for improving member engagement; and C. Review performance on the significant drivers of engagement to identify priorities for action.

31 Member engagement A. Calculation of engagement index cont. Step 2: Statistically defining engagement. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted using measures from Step 1 to identify which of these were loading onto a single factor (i.e. measuring the same construct). This was done at an aggregate level across all associations and at the individual association level to explore whether the engagement construct differed across associations. The results identified a single model of engagement for all participating associations, presented below. The numbers in brackets beneath each measure indicates the relative weight (i.e. factor loading) each measure has on engagement. 31 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd MEMBER ENGAGEMENT Value (0.89) Performance on services (0.83) Propensity to recommend (0.80) Overall Performance (0.91) A. Calculate an engagement index using a combination of theory and statistics to enable benchmarking and tracking of performance over time; B. Identify significant drivers of engagement specific to each association to provide tactical information for improving member engagement; and C. Review performance on the significant drivers of engagement to identify priorities for action.

32 A. Calculation of engagement index cont. Step 3: Using a weighted average approach to calculate an engagement index. An engagement index was calculated using a weighted average approach taking into account the relative weights of each of the above measures derived from EFA. The formula is presented below. Member engagement 32 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Overall performance x 0.91 + Value x 0.89 + Performance on services x 0.83 + Propensity to recommend x 0.80 0.91 + 0.89 + 0.83 + 0.80 ENGAGEMENT = A. Calculate an engagement index using a combination of theory and statistics to enable benchmarking and tracking of performance over time; B. Identify significant drivers of engagement specific to each association to provide tactical information for improving member engagement; and C. Review performance on the significant drivers of engagement to identify priorities for action.

33 Member engagement B. Identifying significant drivers of engagement The next step was to understand the significant drivers of engagement specific to each participating association (all possible drivers explored in the analysis are depicted below). 33 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd MEMBER ENGAGEMENT Building the standing of its members Communicating to members Enabling me to demonstrate to others the commitment to high professional and ethical standards Giving me a sense of belonging to a professional community Helping build alliances with other members Helping me develop my career / improve job prospects Keeping me up-to-date with developments or issues impacting my field / business Providing access to information that will assist me to perform my role Providing leadership in the field Providing valuable credentials, certification, registration or post-nominals Representing members’ interests in the media and/or at a government level Supporting the development of my knowledge and skills Supporting the promotion of our business A. Calculate an engagement index using a combination of theory and statistics to enable benchmarking and tracking of performance over time; B. Identify significant drivers of engagement specific to each association to provide tactical information for improving member engagement; and C. Review performance on the significant drivers of engagement to identify priorities for action.

34 Member engagement B. Identifying significant drivers of engagement The attribute ‘Providing opportunities for members to participate in policy development and / or lobbying and advocacy activities’ was excluded from the engagement driver analysis for the following reasons: – a large proportion of members gave this attribute a rating of ‘5’, indicating a degree of ambivalence or uncertainty on how to respond to this question; and – a large proportion of members responded ‘don’t know / NA’ and had to be removed from the analysis. Exploratory relationship analysis was initially undertaken to identify the relationship between attributes (i.e. linear vs. non-linear) and to inform the modeling approach. All attributes were found to be linearly related and linear regression analysis was used (refer to next slide for more detail). 34 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd A. Calculate an engagement index using a combination of theory and statistics to enable benchmarking and tracking of performance over time; B. Identify significant drivers of engagement specific to each association to provide tactical information for improving member engagement; and C. Review performance on the significant drivers of engagement to identify priorities for action.

35 Member engagement B. Identifying significant drivers of engagement Multiple regression analysis was conducted to determine the relative importance of each attribute on driving engagement. Multiple regression models the relationship between engagement as an outcome variable and all the independent attributes as driver variables. The contribution of each attribute is reported as a standardised beta score. Beta scores have been indexed to 100% to show the relative importance of each attribute. The higher the indexed beta score, the greater the strength of the relationship and the more important the attribute is in driving engagement. Please note the following: – only attributes that contribute significantly to the engagement regression model are reported in this section; and – derived importance scores are from PRIA member data only. The following slide outlines interpretation guidelines for multiple regression analysis results. 35 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd A. Calculate an engagement index using a combination of theory and statistics to enable benchmarking and tracking of performance over time; B. Identify significant drivers of engagement specific to each association to provide tactical information for improving member engagement; and C. Review performance on the significant drivers of engagement to identify priorities for action.

36 B. Identifying significant drivers of engagement – interpretation guidelines Member engagement 36 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Represents the importance of ‘Communicating to members’ in driving Engagement relative to all other attributes. In this example, ‘Communicating to members’ is approximately twice as important as ‘Building the stranding of its members’ in driving Engagement. Shows the overall explanatory power of the model. The closer this is to 1 the higher the explanatory power. In this example, the model accounted for 71.6% of the variation in Engagement. These are the attributes that significantly drive Engagement shown in descending order of importance. In this example, the most important drivers of Engagement are ‘Communicating to members’ and ‘Providing leadership in the field’. Example only A. Calculate an engagement index using a combination of theory and statistics to enable benchmarking and tracking of performance over time; B. Identify significant drivers of engagement specific to each association to provide tactical information for improving member engagement; and C. Review performance on the significant drivers of engagement to identify priorities for action.

37 Member engagement C. Review of PRIA’s performance on the significant drivers of engagement The strategic priority matrix shows PRIA’s key areas of strength and areas in need of improvement relative to PRIA’s performance on all attributes. The strategic priority matrix is based on two key metrics; absolute performance and derived importance scores on engagement: – absolute performance is the PRIA’s mean rating on a particular attribute out of 10; and – derived importance is the relative importance of each attribute in driving engagement, as defined in the previous chart. Derived importance is shown on the horizontal axis as the difference between the indexed beta score for each attribute and the average indexed beta score across all attributes. The vertical axis is PRIA’s absolute performance on each attribute. Refer to the next slide for an example chart and interpretation guidelines. 37 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd A. Calculate an engagement index using a combination of theory and statistics to enable benchmarking and tracking of performance over time; B. Identify significant drivers of engagement specific to each association to provide tactical information for improving member engagement; and C. Review performance on the significant drivers of engagement to identify priorities for action.

38 Member engagement The following charts contain the results for: – overall engagement for PRIA and all benchmarked associations; – significant drivers of engagement specific to PRIA and their relative importance in driving engagement; and – performance of PRIA on the significant drivers of engagement (Strategic priority matrix). 38 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd

39 Percent positive (5.5-10) is displayed in brackets above each bar 5.1.1 Member engagement 39 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Question:Various Base:Current members of PRIA. Extremely engaged (7.5-10)Disengaged(2.5<4.5)Extremely disengaged (0<2.5)Ambivalent (4.5<5.5)Engaged (5.5<7.5)

40 5.1.2 Drivers of engagement for PRIA 40 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd

41 C. Review of PRIA’s performance on the significant drivers of engagement – interpretation guidelines Member engagement 41 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd AREAS TO BUILD ON & COMMUNICATE This attributes is important in driving engagement and is an area where the association in this example is performing well PRIORITIES FOR ACTION This attributes in this quadrant are important in driving engagement and is an area where the association in this example is NOT performing well SECONDARY PRIORITIES Attributes in this quadrant are less important in driving engagement and they are also areas where the association in this example is NOT performing well MAINTAIN PERFORMANCE Attributes in this quadrant are less important in driving engagement BUT they are areas where the association in this example is performing well A. Calculate an engagement index using a combination of theory and statistics to enable benchmarking and tracking of performance over time; B. Identify significant drivers of engagement specific to each association to provide tactical information for improving member engagement; and C. Review performance on the significant drivers of engagement to identify priorities for action. Example only The vertical axis is split at a mean score of 6.5. This is the 75th percentile of all associations average scores across all attributes. i.e. the top 25% of associations perform above this line.

42 5.1.3 Strategic priority matrix 42 Base:Current members of PRIA. © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd KEY STRENGTHS IMPROVEMENT PRIORITIESSECONDARY PRIORITIES MAINTAIN PERFORMANCE

43 5.2Performance benchmarking © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 43

44 PRIA scored significantly lower than the benchmark set average on overall performance (6.74 vs. 6.41); significantly behind 7 benchmarked associations. The top three highest rated attributes were: – Communicating to members (not a significant driver of engagement): 7.18, significantly below the benchmark set average (7.34); – Keeping me up-to-date with developments or issues impacting my field / business (#7 significant driver of engagement): 6.56, significantly below the benchmark set average (7.12); and – Providing access to information that will assist me to perform my role (#2 significant driver of engagement): 6.52, significantly below the benchmark set average (6.70). Chapter summary – Performance benchmarking © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 44

45 Significance testing. Significance tests are performed between mean ratings of the focus association (i.e. PRIA) and each individual benchmarked association. Associations with ratings significantly different from the focus association are marked with asterisks corresponding to the appropriate confidence level. Net positive scores. The number in brackets above the bars indicates the net positive score, which is the sum of ‘good’ and ‘excellent’ ratings. Mean scores. The line crossing the bars indicates the mean rating for each association. Total. This is the aggregate result for all benchmarked associations, excluding PRIA. 45 Performance benchmarking – interpretation guidelines © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Focus association Assc1 Assc2Assc3Assc4Assc5 Assc6 Assc7Assc8Assc9Assoc1Assc10 Assc11 Assc12Assc13 Sig testing: There is a significant difference b/w mean ratings of the focus association and Associations 8 and 9 at a 95% confidence level Sig testing: There is a significant difference b/w mean ratings of the focus association and Association 6 at a 90% confidence level Sig testing: There is no significant difference b/w mean ratings of the focus association and Association 5 Example only Net Positive: 80% of respondents provided ratings between 6 and 10 (inclusive) out of 10 on this measure Percent positive (6-10) is displayed in brackets above each bar Excellent (8-10)Poor (3-4)Extremely poor (0-2)Average (5) Good (6-7)

46 5.2.1 Overall performance Question:Taking all of your experiences with PRIA into account, how would you rate its overall performance over the past 12 months? Base:Current members of PRIA. 46 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Excellent (8-10)Poor (3-4)Extremely poor (0-2)Average (5)Good (6-7) Percent positive (5.5-10) is displayed in brackets above each bar

47 5.2.2 Building the standing of its members Question:How would you rate the performance of PRIA over the past 12 months on each of the following? Base:Current members of PRIA. 47 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Excellent (8-10)Poor (3-4)Extremely poor (0-2)Average (5)Good (6-7) Percent positive (5.5-10) is displayed in brackets above each bar

48 5.2.3 Communicating to members Question:How would you rate the performance of PRIA over the past 12 months on each of the following? Base:Current members of PRIA. 48 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Excellent (8-10)Poor (3-4)Extremely poor (0-2)Average (5)Good (6-7) Percent positive (5.5-10) is displayed in brackets above each bar

49 5.2.4 Enabling me to demonstrate to others a commitment to high professional and ethical standards Question:How would you rate the performance of PRIA over the past 12 months on each of the following? Base:Current members of PRIA. 49 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Excellent (8-10)Poor (3-4)Extremely poor (0-2)Average (5)Good (6-7) Percent positive (5.5-10) is displayed in brackets above each bar

50 5.2.5 Giving me a sense of belonging to a professional community Question:How would you rate the performance of PRIA over the past 12 months on each of the following? Base:Current members of PRIA. 50 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Excellent (8-10)Poor (3-4)Extremely poor (0-2)Average (5)Good (6-7) Percent positive (5.5-10) is displayed in brackets above each bar

51 5.2.6 Helping build alliances with other members Question:How would you rate the performance of PRIA over the past 12 months on each of the following? Base:Current members of PRIA. 51 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Excellent (8-10)Poor (3-4)Extremely poor (0-2)Average (5)Good (6-7) Percent positive (5.5-10) is displayed in brackets above each bar

52 5.2.7 Helping me develop my career / improving my job prospects Question:How would you rate the performance of PRIA over the past 12 months on each of the following? Base:Current members of PRIA. 52 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Excellent (8-10)Poor (3-4)Extremely poor (0-2)Average (5)Good (6-7) Percent positive (5.5-10) is displayed in brackets above each bar

53 5.2.8 Keeping me up-to-date with developments or issues impacting my field / business Question:How would you rate the performance of PRIA over the past 12 months on each of the following? Base:Current members of PRIA. 53 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Excellent (8-10)Poor (3-4)Extremely poor (0-2)Average (5)Good (6-7) Percent positive (5.5-10) is displayed in brackets above each bar

54 5.2.9 Providing access to information that will assist me to perform my role Question:How would you rate the performance of PRIA over the past 12 months on each of the following? Base:Current members of PRIA. 54 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Excellent (8-10)Poor (3-4)Extremely poor (0-2)Average (5)Good (6-7) Percent positive (5.5-10) is displayed in brackets above each bar

55 5.2.10 Providing leadership in the field Question:How would you rate the performance of PRIA over the past 12 months on each of the following? Base:Current members of PRIA. 55 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Excellent (8-10)Poor (3-4)Extremely poor (0-2)Average (5)Good (6-7) Percent positive (5.5-10) is displayed in brackets above each bar

56 5.2.11 Providing opportunities for members to participate in policy development and / or lobbying and advocacy activities Question:How would you rate the performance of PRIA over the past 12 months on each of the following? Base:Current members of PRIA. 56 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Excellent (8-10)Poor (3-4)Extremely poor (0-2)Average (5)Good (6-7) Percent positive (5.5-10) is displayed in brackets above each bar

57 5.2.12 Providing valuable credentials, certification, registration or post-nominals Question:How would you rate the performance of PRIA over the past 12 months on each of the following? Base:Current members of PRIA. 57 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Excellent (8-10)Poor (3-4)Extremely poor (0-2)Average (5)Good (6-7) Percent positive (5.5-10) is displayed in brackets above each bar

58 5.2.13 Representing members' interests in the media and / or at a government level Question:How would you rate the performance of PRIA over the past 12 months on each of the following? Base:Current members of PRIA. 58 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Excellent (8-10)Poor (3-4)Extremely poor (0-2)Average (5)Good (6-7) Percent positive (5.5-10) is displayed in brackets above each bar

59 5.2.14 Supporting the development of my knowledge and skills Question:How would you rate the performance of PRIA over the past 12 months on each of the following? Base:Current members of PRIA. 59 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Excellent (8-10)Poor (3-4)Extremely poor (0-2)Average (5)Good (6-7) Question:How would you rate the performance of PRIA over the past 12 months on each of the following? Base:Current members of PRIA. Percent positive (5.5-10) is displayed in brackets above each bar

60 5.2.15 Supporting the promotion of our business Question:How would you rate the performance of PRIA over the past 12 months on each of the following? Base:Current members of PRIA. 60 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Excellent (8-10)Poor (3-4)Extremely poor (0-2)Average (5)Good (6-7) Percent positive (5.5-10) is displayed in brackets above each bar

61 5.3Performance tracking © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 61

62 PRIA’s overall performance is slightly higher in 2010: 6.41, up from 6.35 in 2009 but still below the previous mark of 6.53 in 2008. There were significant improvements in performance in 2010 on: – Providing access to information that will assist me to perform my role (#2 significant driver of member engagement): 6.52, up from 6.07 in 2009; – Providing leadership in the field (not a significant driver of member engagement): 6.30, up from 5.90; – Giving me a sense of belonging to a professional community (#4 significant driver of member engagement): 6.51 up from 6.09; – Keeping me up-to-date with developments or issues impacting my field / business (#7 significant driver of member engagement): 6.56, up from 6.05; and – Supporting the development of my knowledge and skills (#1 significant driver of member engagement); 6.38 up from 6.08. PRIA’s performance did not significantly drop on any attributes in 2010. Chapter summary – Performance tracking © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 62

63 63 Performance tracking – interpretation guidelines © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd The 2010 ‘overall performance’ mean score is significantly lower than the 2009 mean score at 95% confidence level. The 2009 mean score on ‘building the standing of its members’ is significantly higher than the 2008 mean score at 90% confidence level. There is no significant difference between mean scores on overall performance in 2009 and 2008. The 2010 net positive score on ‘enabling me to…’ is significantly higher than the 2009 net positive score at 80% confidence level. Example only There is an upward trend in the net positive score for ‘building the standing of its members’ over the last 4 yrs. The forecast result for the next 12 months is 74.84% net positive. Significance testing. Significance tests are performed between mean, percent positive (e.g. ‘good’ and ‘excellent’) and percent negative (e.g. ‘extremely poor’ and ‘poor’) ratings from one year and the previous year (e.g. 2010 vs. 2009, 2009 vs. 2008 etc.). Asterisks indicate whether a significant change has occurred from the previous year. Significantly lower results are shaded red and significantly higher results green. Where there are no significant differences, the cell is blank. Trend analysis. Trend analysis has been performed to forecast results in the next 12 months based on data patterns in previous four years. It is only performed where there are four or more years of historical data on an attribute. Significant trends are at a 90% confidence level.

64 5.3.1 Performance tracking - overall performance 64 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Question:Taking all of your experiences with PRIA into account, how would you rate its overall performance over the past 12 months? Note:Significance testing is performed on mean scores only for this chart. Significance testing on % +ve scores is shown in the tables that follow. Base:Current members of PRIA.

65 5.3.2 Performance tracking - attributes 65 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Note:Trend analysis is based on data from the four most recent years. Trend analysis is not performed if there are less than four years available. Base:Current members of PRIA.

66 5.3.3 Performance tracking - attributes 66 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Note:Trend analysis is based on data from the four most recent years. Trend analysis is not performed if there are less than four years available. Base:Current members of PRIA.

67 5.3.4 Performance tracking - attributes 67 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Note:Trend analysis is based on data from the four most recent years. Trend analysis is not performed if there are less than four years available. Base:Current members of PRIA.

68 5.3.5 Performance tracking - attributes 68 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Note:Trend analysis is based on data from the four most recent years. Trend analysis is not performed if there are less than four years available. Base:Current members of PRIA.

69 5.4Performance by key demographics © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 69

70 There were significant differences in member engagement across location and generational profiles – Qld members were least engaged (6.13 vs. 6.62 for PRIA’s overall member engagement) while WA members were most engaged (6.83); – Baby boomers (50+ years) were least engaged (6.46) while Gen Y (under 30 years) were most engaged (6.90). There were also significant differences in overall performance across generational profiles – Baby boomers (50+ years) scored lowest (6.06 vs. 6.41 for PRIA’s total overall performance) while Gen Y (under 30 years) scored highest (6.75). Chapter summary – Performance by key demographics © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 70

71 Analysis of performance by key demographics 71 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd This chapter summarises PRIA performance by the following demographics: – location; – generational profile; and – member type.

72 5.4.1 Performance by location 72 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Note:Significance testing is conducted between groups at a 95% (***), 90% (**) and 80% (*) confidence level where indicated. Base:Current members of PRIA.

73 5.4.2 Performance by generational profile 73 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Note:Significance testing is conducted between groups at a 95% (***), 90% (**) and 80% (*) confidence level where indicated. Base:Current members of PRIA.

74 5.4.3 Performance by member type 74 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Note:Significance testing is conducted between groups at a 95% (***), 90% (**) and 80% (*) confidence level where indicated. Base:Current members of PRIA.

75 5.5Attraction of members © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 75

76 Word-of-mouth network… PRIA was also below the benchmark set on recommendation: – Propensity to recommend: 7.28, compared to the benchmark set average (7.38), significantly behind 6 and ahead of 3 benchmarked association; and – Net promoter score: -0.3, compared to the benchmark set average (1.8), significantly behind 6 and ahead of 3 benchmarked association. PRIA membership was rated significantly lower than the benchmark set average for its potential to increase one’s earning capacity (2.56 vs. 3.43 for the benchmark set average). Chapter summary – Attraction of members © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 76 “I have found the information i have received from PRIA to be extremely valuable in becoming better at my craft.” “Being a member and having access to the website gave and continues to give me an insight into the direction of the Public Relations profession in Australia.” Some reasons given for low ratings of value include: “I would like more information, courses and support on Internal Communications, not just on PR” “All student related functions are too expensive for a student to go to.” Perceived value of PRIA membership was significantly lower than the benchmark set (5.92 vs. 6.44), significantly ahead of 1 and behind 8 benchmarked associations. Some reasons given for high ratings of value include:

77 Attraction of members 77 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd This chapter addresses the following: – reasons for joining PRIA in the last 12 months; – perceived value of PRIA membership; – potential for increasing one’s earning capacity through their membership with PRIA; – likelihood of recommending PRIA to a friend or family member in the same profession and net promoter scores; and – likelihood of renewing membership when it next expires.

78 5.5.1 Reasons for joining in the last 12 months Question:Which of the following statements best represent your main reasons for becoming a member of PRIA? To… Base:Current members who have been with PRIA 1 year or less. 78 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd

79 5.5.2 Value of membership Question:In your opinion, how would you rate the value you receive from PRIA? Base:Current members of PRIA. 79 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Extremely value (8-10)Somewhat valuable (3-4)Not at all valuable (0-2)Average value (5)Very valuable (6-7) Percent positive (5.5-10) is displayed in brackets above each bar

80 5.5.3 Potential to increase earning capacity Question:How strongly do you agree or disagree with the following statement? “Being a member of PRIA allows me to earn substantially more money compared non-members in a similar role to mine.” Base:Current members of PRIA. 80 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Strongly agree (8-10)Disagree (3-4)Strongly disagree (0-2)Neutral (5)Agree (6-7) Percent positive (5.5-10) is displayed in brackets above each bar

81 5.5.4 Propensity to recommend Question:Would you recommend becoming a member of PRIA to a friend or family member who is working in your profession or industry? Base:Current members of PRIA. 81 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Definitely would (8-10)Probably would not (3-4)Definitely would not (0-2)Neutral (5)Probably would (6-7) Percent positive (5.5-10) is displayed in brackets above each bar

82 5.5.5 Net promoter score Question:Would you recommend becoming a member of PRIA to a friend or family member who is working in your profession or industry? Note:Based on responses to the above question, members are categorised into one of three groups: Promoters (9-10 rating), Passives (7-8 rating), and Detractors (0-6 rating). The percentage of Detractors is then subtracted from the percentage of Promoters to obtain a Net Promoter score. The maximum score achievable is 100 and the minimum -100. Base:Current members of PRIA. 82 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd

83 5.6Membership renewal © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 83

84 PRIA scored significantly lower than the benchmark set average on likelihood of membership renewal (8.05 vs. 8.51) significantly behind 9 benchmarked associations. – Likelihood of membership renewal was also down in 2010 (7.92) compared to 2009 (8.14). The proportion likelihood of students upgrading was also significantly below the benchmark set average, (6.83 vs. 7.65). Ways in which some of these respondents felt they’d be encouraged to renew their membership are included below: © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 84 “Attract international speakers to events - offer more opportunities to debate current topics and trend” “Drop fees for self funded PR practitioners and offer more PD targeting older practitioners.” “I'm looking for learning opportunities suited to my needs, close to work and at a price that I can afford to pay.” “I'm most interested in access to research findings as well as events that relate to fields other than PR (e.g. marketing etc).” “Better support in house communications practitioners, respond to queries more efficiently…” Chapter summary – Membership renewal

85 Membership renewal 85 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd This chapter addresses the following: – likelihood of membership renewal when it next expires; – tracking of intention to renew membership; and – likelihood of students upgrading their membership type.

86 5.6.1 Likelihood of membership renewal Question:How likely are you to renew your membership when it next expires? Base:Current members of PRIA. 86 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Definitely will (8-10)Probably will not (3-4)Definitely will not (0-2)Neutral (5)Probably will (6-7) Percent positive (5.5-10) is displayed in brackets above each bar

87 5.6.2 Likelihood of membership renewal - tracking Question:How likely are you to renew your membership when it next expires? Base:Current members of PRIA. 87 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd

88 5.6.3 Likelihood of students upgrading Question:When you graduate / qualify, how likely will you be to upgrade your membership with PRIA? Base:Respondents who hold a student membership with PRIA. 88 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Definitely will (8-10)Probably will not (3-4)Definitely will not (0-2)Neutral (5)Probably will (6-7) Percent positive (6-10) is displayed in brackets

89 5.7Performance on touchpoints © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 89

90 Touchpoints accessed The most commonly accessed PRIA services include: – e-newsletter / e-bulletin (85%). – Website (including members’ section) (76%); – Received e-mails from PRIA (64%); and – Seminars / Conferences (53%). Performance on touchpoints Relative to all services PRIA members accessed, PRIA scored well on touchpoints most frequently accessed, for example ‘seminars / conferences’ and ‘e-newsletter / e-bulletin’ – but scored lower on ‘received emails from PRIA’ and ‘website (including members’ section). © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 90 Chapter summary –Touchpoints

91 Performance on touchpoints 91 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd For the purposes of this chapter, touchpoints are any opportunity an individual has to interact with PRIA. This chapter contains results for: – all touch points accessed by members; – performance on touchpoints accessed by members; and – touchpoints accessed vs. performance.

92 5.7.1 Touchpoints accessed 92 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Question:Which of the following have you accessed through (or experienced from) PRIA in the last 12 months? Base:Current members of PRIA and respondents who use PRIA’s services but are not members.

93 5.7.2 Performance on touchpoints 93 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Question:And for those you accessed or experienced, how would you rate the performance of PRIA on each, in the last 12 months? Base:Current members of PRIA and respondents who use PRIA’s services but are not members.

94 5.7.3 Touchpoints accessed vs. performance 94 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Base:Current members of PRIA and respondents who use PRIA’s services but are not members.

95 6.Verbatim comments © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 95

96 6.1 Reasons for 'extremely high' ratings of value (9 to 10) As a public relations educator, the PRIA provides an essential channel of communication with the profession. PRIA membership is also extremely important in terms of professional accreditation and status. Comprehensive, concise and incisive. Credibility by being associated with the PRIA. Access to free webinars with quality speakers; these are what I value most because as a regional professional I can't make it to most of the regular events on offer in the cities. Access to excellent national and international speakers at the conference. Currently I am working in an organisation without a direct line manager which a strict marketing/pr background, and i find it difficult to get assistance and guidance from anyone in my field. I have found the information i have received from the PRIA to be extremely valuable in becoming better at my craft. Good source of information. Represents members where needed. Promotes profession of public relations. Great service when required, access to support information is very good, and webinars very useful. Great training courses; the RCG annual conferences are excellent; good information; active on issues. Having the support of a group that is directly related to the degree I am studying is very valuable. Being a member and having access to the website gave and continues to give me an insight into the direction of the Public Relations profession in Australia. It also gives access to valuable networking opportunities, and although I haven't been able to afford any of them, the fact that I can join them one day is comforting and exciting. Important to have an industry association to give credibility to the industry and the professionals working in it. Industry bodies are vital. Keeps me up to date on all the latest in the industry. Networks, new business, skill development for myself and my staff, industry updates. 96 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Question:You rated the value you receive from PRIA as “extremely valuable”. Please use the space provided to tell us why. Note:Verbatim comments are unedited. Base:Current members of PRIA.

97 6.1 Reasons for 'extremely high' ratings of value (9 to 10) PRIA gives me so much insight, jobs emails, and also workshops which I find really useful for someone who has just graduated from studying Public Relations at uni to break through into the industry. Regular updates, invitations to events etc. help to understand and grow in the PR industry. Support network, professional development opportunities, resources etc. The amount of information that is provided on the web site by way of articles and case studies has so far been extremely helpful to me. I was surprised how much information was there. AS i have only been a member for a short time, this has been the limit of my experience but I'm sure i will be come familiar with more benefits over time. The networking nights are invaluable. I have met some lovely girls who have become friends and I look forward to each event to catch up and see how they are all going. The people I met there also directly led to me getting my first job as a graduate and in this economy that truly is invaluable. The PRIA has a good reputation and profile amongst professionals and is a valued support for its members. The PRIA has given me the opportunity to meet and learn from other members of our profession. I have attended many interesting and useful conferences and workshops with the PRIA. The PRIA provides the platform for industry standards/ethics and for continuing education. The seminars and courses are excellent, social meetings great (I only attend once in a while, but worth it) and great networking opportunities. In particular, the seminars and webinars are topical. The type of value has changed over the years. It was initially and still offers me great networking benefits. There has been the professional development. More recently I've been able to contribute to Institute policies and guidelines. 97 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Question:You rated the value you receive from PRIA as “extremely valuable”. Please use the space provided to tell us why. Note:Verbatim comments are unedited. Base:Current members of PRIA.

98 6.2 Reasons for ‘average' ratings of value (3 to 5) A couple of reasons: 1. Events are generally not that compelling to attend, and 2. Not enough time to get involved in functions, events and professional development. As a freelancer, working predominantly in the non-profit sector and based in Brisbane I don't feel there is much that fits my particular needs. PRIA seems more geared to support those in agencies and more in touch with those voices. That said I've only been a member again for less than a year and I appreciate that I need to engage as well. I did have a terrible experience with a very hard sales push for attendance of their annual conference where the cold calling salesperson clearly had no idea about the realities of being a freelancer. Kept pushing tickets at me and harassing me about choosing not to go when I had clearly explained it was priced well beyond my means as a freelancer. As a student I found much of the correspondence from PRIA was related to events that I was invited to attend- however I simply couldn't afford the cost. I also have found little in the way of helpful specific material on the website about internship or job options. As a younger Practitioner i tend to see a lot of older practitioners attempting to catch up their skill through their training and discussions offered by the PRIA - the benefit for younger practitioners to extend their already extensive knowledge in areas on new and social media is not as tailored as it could be. As an organisational and employee communication specialist, the focus of PRIA is not oriented strongly to these disciplines. As I have been a student the PRIA has not been overly useful as yet. I think it will benefit more when I am working as a professional. As I've got older, I need it less and I learn little of any value. Insights are limited too. This is understandable given that the Assoc needs to help more junior people, but that focus lessens the appeal of the Assoc for older members. I'm not complaining about it though. Attend some courses, but not able to participate more because of time restraints. Being in a regional area I would like the Institute to make more effort to provide localised events. Doesn't relate quite so much to my line of work. I am in community relations - on the coal face of things. 98 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Question:You rated the value you receive from PRIA as “somewhat valuable”. Please use the space provided to tell us why. Note:Verbatim comments are unedited. Base:Current members of PRIA.

99 6.2 Reasons for ‘average' ratings of value (3 to 5) E-news often provides good leads on new directions in professional practice for PR and give me new information to think about in relation to my work. Events are expensive which makes them quite cost prohibitive (personal expensive, not covered by employer). I haven't accessed any books/articles yet but it would be good to be told about specials etc. Events/educational mainly relevant to inexperienced practitioners, rather than experienced PR execs who want specialist info in specific field (marketing communications) and cutting edge info. From time to time there are webinars of note. Most of the time there is little for me.. Get little in return for membership. Email service and website are excellent. Events are not affordable or accessible. Good to have professional membership. Good to have access to the website and some of the training sessions have been good. Haven't attended any events as yet but i expect that if i did i would get more value. Haven't had a chance to participate much yet, other than buying books - which is great. Thanks. I am a member of a number of other professional organisation. PRIA is about the middle of the pack in terms of value - member services are disjointed and very centralised, information flow is good, membership fees are average, industry leadership/advocacy is poor to non-existent, networking and fellowship is good. I am an independent consultant - PRIA seems to cater more for professionals operating within large organisations. I am close to retirement but have retained my membership. You provide plenty of relevant information - as well as many opportunities for peer involvement. However, this is all of limited interest to me at this stage of my career. I am not overwhelmed by the usefulness of my membership, but I intend to continue to be a member as I believe joining things is a good idea and hope to make use of discounts for training programs. I am unable to attend any of the seminars as they are held in the city and are often too expensive for me to attend. 99 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Question:You rated the value you receive from PRIA as “somewhat valuable”. Please use the space provided to tell us why. Note:Verbatim comments are unedited. Base:Current members of PRIA.

100 6.2 Reasons for ‘average' ratings of value (3 to 5) I attend seminars, that's currently all I'm getting out of my membership. Often the seminars are not relevant to me or my work. I'm a member out of personal interest, not supported by an employer. So it's not easy to find the money for the events etc. I do not often get the opportunity to participate in events however I find the emailed articles an interesting and relevant way to keep up to date in the industry. I don't feel the events offered are especially relevant, either in terms of professional development or industry trends. I don't go to a lot of events or use the membership as much as i would like to, but i do find the stuff i do participate in of value. I don't go to much as events are very expensive. As a very experienced practitioner I very rarely gain anything new so I'm really paying to support the organisation. I don't often get a chance to attend events etc... so don't get as much value as I could.. I don't work in a consultancy or commercial environment and many of the courses and resources are for agencies. Also, much of the material is for management - not as much for junior employees. I enjoy the online training available. I live in a remote area, so can not participate in many of the city based workshops and functions. I found that during the year PRIA ACT focussed too much on social media. While this is one new medial tool - it is not the only one... For some organisations Social Media is just not the right medium for its audience... A bit more variety in the regular events would have been more valuable to me... I also found the ACT branch difficult to deal with as some of my queries were not replied to.. I have made several requests to the national office by email and they have not been answered - i see this as poor customer service, especially for a membership based organisation which is about 'public relations'. I also signed one of my staff members up and she tried contacting the national and Queensland offices with a query and received no response. I have only been to one or two seminars (ever) that was of use. Most seem to appeal to entry level members or any good ones are interstate. Have not attended one event this year. Unfortunately I could not attend the conference this year, which would have been good. 100 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Question:You rated the value you receive from PRIA as “somewhat valuable”. Please use the space provided to tell us why. Note:Verbatim comments are unedited. Base:Current members of PRIA.

101 6.2 Reasons for ‘average' ratings of value (3 to 5) I have so far done one course which was fine but haven't used PRIA for anything else. I live in regional Queensland. The only events or opportunities that come up are all in Brisbane, at times I cannot attend. Apart from that, there is little other proactive service that the PRIA provide to me. I live in rural Qld so attending events is difficult and this is where the real value of the membership lies. Most if not all the professional development opportunities appear to be attendance based activities. I move between various Marketing, Journalist and PR functions. The PRIA is relevant to a proportion of my work, not all. Very useful for the part that is relevant. I receive frequent emails which informs me of relevant information and upcoming events. I receive useful academic resources but don't interact with other members often enough. I think I would prefer it if your fees were higher, but there were more free events. I think the Institute should offer more events in regional areas. On the Sunshine Coast for example there are dozens of members who would participate. In fact we have even started our own networking functions. It is just a shame we can't get the same support as practitioners in capital cities. The webinars are however good. It would be good also if we were able to attend and pay for just selected sessions at the conference. I use it for workshops, and for journal articles. I was recently looking for a PR job and thought the PR institute should have more resources readily available for job seekers in the industry. I would like more information, courses and support on Internal Communications, not just on PR. I would like more opportunities to network with industry colleagues. 101 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Question:You rated the value you receive from PRIA as “somewhat valuable”. Please use the space provided to tell us why. Note:Verbatim comments are unedited. Base:Current members of PRIA.

102 6.2 Reasons for ‘average' ratings of value (3 to 5) I'm a member because I'm in business for myself and I see it as beneficial to be able to include the letters after my name - I believe it adds credibility and authenticity to my practice. However, even though I'm actively involved in my local chapter, I struggle to recommend membership to my peers because I don't feel I get a great deal more out of it - information resources are useful but very limited, and any kind of event, seminar or professional development activity comes with a significant additional cost that, as a micro business owner, I can't justify. Furthermore, I find the 'members discount' for these is usually very small and therefore, barely worth mentioning!. In the past I have contacted the Institute for professional assistance. The latest was when I was on contract as the media contact to a government organisation and I was being pressured, under a Freedom of Information order, to disclose information concerning conversations with media representatives. As I am also a member of the MEAA, I felt I was in a difficult situation as the media representative had not published their article and the FOI order had been raised by the private sector organisation which was the focus of the media's investigation. I believed the information concerning the media could be viewed by them as commercial in confidence. I contacted a number of PRIA representatives and none provided any assistance despite promises. Other issues involve the lack of clarity of information during 2009 Golden Target Award process. I put in an entry and heard nothing until I received an email a week before the final entries were due, congratulating me again for being a finalist. When I rang head office to ask when and how the first notification of being a finalist was distributed. I was told the notifications were by email, and that the original notification would be forwarded to me. I never received any communication with the person I spoke to concerning this matter. When I rang for qualification of how a page was defined in the final entry (pages are limited and I wanted to know whether an A4 brochure viewed as one or two pages) I was assured this information would be sought and provided to me. I am still waiting. This lack of communication continued through the entire process with multiple calls to the ACT and Head Office being required to sort what should have been hassle free issues such as booking seats at the ACT award dinner. I could go on and on and on. Actually, thinking about it, I think I'm being really generous giving the Institute a 5. I'm hard pressed to think of a real benefit I get from my membership. I'm more than happy to discuss this, but I simply don't have the time at the moment, particularly as I know little will change. 102 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Question:You rated the value you receive from PRIA as “somewhat valuable”. Please use the space provided to tell us why. Note:Verbatim comments are unedited. Base:Current members of PRIA.

103 6.2 Reasons for ‘average' ratings of value (3 to 5) Information on the web, publications provided and newsletter information. It conveys a certain authority to unwitting clients. It is good to be able to say I am a member of my profession's peak industry association. Credibility factor. The events in the past 12 months have also been of more relevance and interest - however I believe the associated could be more active. It is good to see what others are doing in this space. However I haven't yet been able to get much use out of resources available. Everyone is so busy and I find I have to go and look for the information. Also as I am not in the inner city it is difficult to get to events after work. It keeps me informed of activities etc even though the PRIA is not active in my region. It would be good if more events were held in Melbourne. It's a great network of PR people, but there's not a lot of benefits to Qld members in terms of events and resources. Most seem to be in Sydney. It's good for ideas, career development and to let you know what's going on in the world of PR. It's good to be part of the Institute however events are often very expensive. Keep in touch with developments - I live in a remote area. Keep up with trends, network. Keeps me updated on industry trends. Limited range of topical and worthy professional development options; seem to see the same faces and ideas recycled each year. 103 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Question:You rated the value you receive from PRIA as “somewhat valuable”. Please use the space provided to tell us why. Note:Verbatim comments are unedited. Base:Current members of PRIA.

104 6.2 Reasons for ‘average' ratings of value (3 to 5) Many of the professional development seminars are too expensive for someone like me who is a newer member and not in a high- salary bracket. The timings of many of the seminars (VERY early so can't get kids to day-care/school or outside of work hours) makes them difficult to attend too. The newsletters are long and waffly, no real information, advice, news from the industry, more like a chatty catch up with everyone. It would be good to have cutting edge tools and examples of great campaigns etc. to look at and study. However the job notifications are good. The seminars I have attended have been well run, with good information presented (albeit a little expensive for what you get). Also, I'd like to see a few free networking events, where a location is called on, but everyone can buy their own drinks, or a cheap networking event that covers some nibbles and a glass or two of wine (similar to our Women In Media events here in Perth). Most functions are too expensive for me. My professional role has somewhat changed so I am not solely PR anymore, but do more marketing & promotion. I find that the topics for events often relate for social media/B2C etc. I would like to see more promotion, B2B aimed topics & internal communications if possible. Also, I hate networking as it terrifies me, it would be great to have more events that were aimed at people like me - e.g. a networking for dummies type of focus of actual attendance, and tips. My work has, in recent years, moved away from mainstream PR, so its value is limited to my current focus. Networking and keeping up to date. Not enough variety for Queensland members. Seminars of interest tend to happen in the southern states and the northern members miss out. Not many resources/ events for regional areas. Only because it's an industry association. It could do a lot to help the industry but doesn't. Opportunity for networking and professional development. 104 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Question:You rated the value you receive from PRIA as “somewhat valuable”. Please use the space provided to tell us why. Note:Verbatim comments are unedited. Base:Current members of PRIA.

105 6.2 Reasons for ‘average' ratings of value (3 to 5) Other than access to conferences and some research, PRIA membership provides little return in terms of future public relations scholarship and practice. PR is not the main focus of my business so I do not use it as much as other professional bodies. PRIA membership provided me with instant professional credibility when I entered the job market in Australia. The opportunity to participate in the organisation and in its professional development seminars and events have also been useful. PRIA provides professional development through courses, seminars. Provides a forum for information about the subject to be collected and distributed in a controlled manner. Public relations now represents only a very small percentage of the range of activities our consultancy provides. Regular professional development courses. Industry awards. Since graduating in 2004 I have been unable to obtain a position within the Public Relations industry, therefore being a member has not assisted in any way hence my reason for choosing the 'middle of the road' option. Some of the networking events and articles are valuable, but sometimes they just seem to 'plug' the same old useless courses (i.e.. RMIT's PR Certificate). Some workshops are relevant to my needs, although many aimed at more junior practitioners. The credentials are valuable and I always recruit staff with the specification that they must be eligible for PRIA membership. Most services require me to attend something and I don't have time for this. The Golden Target Awards are worthwhile recognition, however, the event itself is pretty lame. One would expect a public relations peak body to put on a savvy and relevant event. This is seldom the case. Beyond the Awards, PRIA doesn't actually do a heck of a lot. The invitations to events - website all good useful tools Professional Development courses offered are good - but variety of courses has not really changed over the years. 105 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Question:You rated the value you receive from PRIA as “somewhat valuable”. Please use the space provided to tell us why. Note:Verbatim comments are unedited. Base:Current members of PRIA.

106 6.2 Reasons for ‘average' ratings of value (3 to 5) The major benefit I have received from the PRIA is discounted access to CPD Training Events. The networking opportunities presented over the past 12 months in Brisbane haven't appealed to me as a senior PR practitioner in a corporate environment. The activities appeared very geared towards consultancy operators, which may reflect the limited corporate opportunities in Brisbane as compared to Sydney or Melbourne. The newsletters are valuable in keeping me up to date with what's happening in the industry and directing me to useful sources of information. However, many of the events and sessions are not a great relevance. The opportunity to attend courses that are high quality and varied in topics. The PRIA is generally slow to respond to queries. When we have requested support it has been, we have had to chase. I think more could be done to support in house PR people and the not for profit sector instead of the focus being on consultants and agencies. The PRIA provide a good resource for all practitioners and people wanting to get a look at what PR professionals are talking about, and concerned with. The PRIA seems to cater primarily for the business sector and entry-level practitioners. This is in line with PRSA in the US which follows a similar pattern, and of which I was a member for about 5 years. As an academic, I am most interested in panel or other discussion of hot topics in public relations, which is a more affordable option as I pay for all activities personally and which is in keeping with my goal of being on the cutting edge. Basic training events are not of interest to me. Networking events and the researcher directory are good. The website has some good information and i appreciate the e-newsletters that keep me informed or made aware of what is new or available, and of upcoming webinars. However, i find it difficult to maximise the benefits due to work time constraints. There are occasionally some helpful things but it is too infrequent. The annual awards are not enough!. There doesn't seem to be much benefit in being a member - only slightly discounted event fees, but they're not particularly good events anyway. I've only joined to enter awards in the past, and now, my employer pays for me. I'm not sure I'd pay for myself. 106 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Question:You rated the value you receive from PRIA as “somewhat valuable”. Please use the space provided to tell us why. Note:Verbatim comments are unedited. Base:Current members of PRIA.

107 6.2 Reasons for ‘average' ratings of value (3 to 5) Training programs are too expensive - and not value for money. Unfortunately I work for a department that for more than five years does not allow me to take part in the annual conference so there is very little networking that I have been able to do with colleagues. Useful info on website, offers ongoing education opportunities. Well, first of all: quality and attention to detail (see receive in question above). Return on investment is minimal - being a member is more of a personal commitment to the profession than anything else. While I value the annual conference, I haven't been alerted to any seminars floating around in Brisbane lately. It'd be nice to be advised of PRIA and PR Seminars in the South East Qld area. Also, I recall trying to access the resources on the PRIA website at one point and don't recall finding any high quality research papers online. While the opportunities for professional development are usually very good, the global financial situation means that companies are reluctant to pay for professional development and they are often too cost prohibitive to pay for out of my own pocket. The webcasts are good, but occur during work time and our system won't let me view them. Wish to provide more information about what's going on in PR industry through newsletter, free events or publications. You have to pay to attend the seminars, which at $44 a seminar the minimum, can add up to quite a bit. My work isn't able to support this, and I don't have capacity to attend as many as I would like (both cost and time). 107 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Question:You rated the value you receive from PRIA as “somewhat valuable”. Please use the space provided to tell us why. Note:Verbatim comments are unedited. Base:Current members of PRIA.

108 6.3 Reasons for ‘below average' ratings of value (0 to 2) All student related functions are too expensive for a student to go to. There are also not a lot of opportunities for students to meet other PR students. Therefore there have not been a lot of opportunities for students to network with other respected PR professionals. As a recent pr graduate, i inquired to PRIA a number of times on some guidance and tips to find some work in the pr industry and received very little feedback. As the industry in itself does not recognise my particular education and experience as relevant; it is difficult to continue association with an institute that represents such a biased view. Besides getting invited to events, I am not sure what else the PRIA can provide me with. And even getting invited to events, I can usually still go if I am a member it is just a little more expensive. Doesn't cater to people in the industry with more experience. In general, aims events and training at new / less experienced practitioners. I don't believe that the PRIA is providing me with relevant information or trends that assist me with my communications management role. I think for a membership based organisation they could offer so much more - power of numbers! (e.g. corporate discounts, offers, events etc). Newsletters were good although only some of the information useful. Courses are good too. I think our membership and association is largely tunnel visioned and out-of-date with what is demanded by their profession. It does not offer me anything of use - it seems to be very much driven by personalities and more focussed on pats on the back. Many events and courses are aimed at new practitioners rather the more experienced practitioners with 10+ years experience. More communication would be nice and an updated website. Other than providing industry information I find the services provided of like benefit due to an inability to access them. So far all the events have been focused upon the Government sector, which does not interest me. I have not received any publications or other information. 108 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Question:You rated the value you receive from PRIA as “not at all valuable”. Please use the space provided to tell us why. Note:Verbatim comments are unedited. Base:Current members of PRIA.

109 6.3 Reasons for ‘below average' ratings of value (0 to 2) The emails are so confusing, I'm not drawn to read them therefore have little involvement with PRIA. The only reason I have kept my membership is to be able to enter my campaigns into the awards under my own name as I do not feel it is fair for me to do the work and someone else gets recognition. I do not believe that the PRIA is a professional representation of our industry. Although I have certainly seen improvements over the last few years in terms of the event organisation etc. Things like typos in written correspondence and disorganisation of the secretariat are frustrating. Some of the articles in the newsletter are good but the training opportunities are not really appropriate to my level or are expensive. The PRIA has little brand awareness, is not a sought after credential amongst clients, provides little for regional members, has yet to produce a worthwhile tool that benefits its members or demonstrates its leadership role, has a poorly designed website and provides similar services to non-members at similar costs. The programs you present are quite expensive (almost $400 for a seminar on colour). Some of the events are somewhat trite. I attended one seminar for members that taught them how to do media releases. The code of ethics is insipid and does not provide any real sanctions (one Perth practitioner is still operating, despite twice being sanctioned). The PRIA needs chartered status, similar to that in England. The Educational arm is run by academics who have little, or no industry experience. There are inconsistencies in the accreditation process (one panel takes an academic line, while another focuses on professional standing). Need I go on. In short, the organisation is typical of any volunteer organisation (amateurish). There was nothing on offer that added to my knowledge in a venue close to me or at a price that I could afford. Too consultancy and youth focused. Works at a very low level. 109 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Question:You rated the value you receive from PRIA as “not at all valuable”. Please use the space provided to tell us why. Note:Verbatim comments are unedited. Base:Current members of PRIA.

110 6.4 Things that could encourage members to renew As a freelancer I am not sure what value there is for me as a member. Will give it careful consideration. Attend to the feedback given in the previous section. Attract international speakers to events - offer more opportunities to debate current topics and trends Better support in house communications practitioners, respond to queries more efficiently, run different events - the same events seem to be held every year. I attended a Melbourne event which was terrible. Drop fees for self funded PR practitioners and offer more PD targeting older practitioners. I am moving away and will no longer need the membership. I became a member to be able to enter the awards and will likely not have access to my organisation's training budget next year. I'm most interested in access to research findings as well as events that relate to fields other than PR (e.g. marketing etc). I do not receive any value out of my membership to justify the cost. I get little value from the membership as I cannot participate in most of the activities due to work constraints. As a tax deduction it still has some value - although I get far more information and contact from my membership of the AMI. I will wait for a while to see whether I should continue as a member. I'm looking for learning opportunities suited to my needs, close to work and at a price that I can afford to pay. I've changed roles and am now in a Policy role. The requirements for my career have temporarily changed Maybe have networking events, and provide more information Offer more to young pr students and graduates. This doesn't include high priced network functions 110 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Question:You said you were not likely to renew your membership when it next expires, please tell us what PRIA could do to encourage you to renew your membership. Note:Verbatim comments are unedited. Base:Current members of PRIA.

111 6.4 Things that could encourage members to renew Provide more information and services tailored to students and not just working professionals with more disposable income. It is important to keep encouraging and motivating undergraduates so that there is fresh talent entering the profession. See previous answer Well,, if you see my previous comments you will understand why I am loathe to pay $300. My membership joining process was abysmal (took two months to sort out) and I received a dismal two-paragraph reply following a recent university accreditation application. I am still waiting a month later for a report. This is pathetic. Work with industry to review its requirements in terms of its members and associates. 111 © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd Question:You said you were not likely to renew your membership when it next expires, please tell us what PRIA could do to encourage you to renew your membership. Note:Verbatim comments are unedited. Base:Current members of PRIA.

112 7.Beaton credentials in brief © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 112

113 Beaton is Australia's leading B2B services research and consulting firm, providing insights to drive business performance Services: – Customised research – Performance tracking – Predictive modelling – Strategy development 25 years experience in professional associations, professional service firms (PSFs), financial service providers, large corporates, government and universities Beaton and our consultants are full members of peak market research associations – AMSRS (individuals) – AMSRO (corporate) We have worked with Australia's largest and most prestigious knowledge-intensive organisations: – PSFs of many types and sizes in Australia, New Zealand and Asia – Major financial, insurance and investment institutions – Major industrial companies in FMCG, building products and services Further information: www.beatonglobal.comwww.beatonglobal.com Beaton credentials in brief © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd

114 Thank-you for participating in the ABPS 2010! We look forward to our continuing partnership in 2011. © 2010 Beaton Research and Consulting Pty Ltd 114


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