Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

© 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Chapter One: Shaping Your Health.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "© 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Chapter One: Shaping Your Health."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Chapter One: Shaping Your Health

2 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. The Millennial Generation Current “traditional” aged students  Ages years  Born between 1982 and 2000

3 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Developmental Tasks of Early Adulthood 1.Forming an initial adult identity (who am I?) 2.Establishing independence 3.Assuming responsibility 4.Broadening social skills 5.Nurturing intimacy

4 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Related Developmental Tasks of Young Adulthood Obtaining entry-level employment Developing parenting skills

5 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Developmental Tasks of Middle Adulthood 1.Achieving generativity—giving back Contributing to the collective good Parenting Traditional way in which people repay society 2.Reassessing plans of young adulthood— one’s original goals and objectives

6 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Developmental Tasks of Older Adulthood 1.Accepting changes of aging 2.Maintaining physical functioning 3.Establishing a sense of integrity—a sense of wholeness concerning life’s journey

7 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Roles and Their Reciprocal Relationship to Developmental Tasks When we assume a role, we also assume the behaviors/ responsibilities that accompany that role Ex: The formation of an initial adult identity can impact the ability of a new graduate to obtain employment and vice versa

8 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Traditional Definitions of Health Concerns  Morbidity: pertaining to illness and disease  Mortality: pertaining to death Episodic health care  Seeking medical treatment when ill or injured Preventive or prospective medicine  Identifying risk factors and high-risk health behaviors to lower the risk of illness  Empowerment

9 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Health Promotion: Personal and Collective Empowerment Individually oriented Group oriented Wellness

10 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Individually-Oriented Health Promotion Individual focuses on personal goals—may overlap with risk reduction for chronic illness Focus on fitness, social interaction, and healthy lifestyle

11 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Group-Oriented Health Promotion Community places emphasis on a group centered concept to promote empowerment Empowerment: The nurturing of an individual’s or group’s ability to be responsible for their own well being.

12 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Wellness A process intended to aid individuals in unlocking their full potential through the development of an overall wellness lifestyle Emphasis on lifestyle  May not focus on mortality and morbidity but in practice shares many risk-reduction activities with health promotion approaches

13 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Healthy People 2010 Healthy People 2010 Two main goals: 1.Increasing quality and years of life. 2.Eliminating health disparities in areas such as gender, race, ethnicity, income, and education level.

14 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Why Behavior Change Is Often Difficult Several factors influence a person’s desire to change a health behavior—the person must 1.Know the behavior is associated with a health problem 2.Accept that the behavior increases personal risk for the health problem 3.Recognize that risk-reduction intervention programs exist and can be effective 4.Believe the benefits of the new behavior justify the change in behavior 5.Feel that significant others will be accepting of such changes

15 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Stages of Change Prochaska et al. (1994) identified the following six stages people go through in changing health behaviors:  Precontemplation  Contemplation  Preparation  Action  Maintenance  Termination

16 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Multiple Dimensions of Health Physical dimension Emotional dimension Social dimension Intellectual dimension Spiritual dimension Occupational dimension Environmental dimension

17 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Young adult roles, health, and an enhanced sense of well-being.

18 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. A New Definition of Health A view less centered on the concepts of morbidity and mortality Two areas of differences to focus on: 1) The role of health (process of transitions) 2) The composition of health –Intrinsic resources –Extrinsic resources

19 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. A New Definition of Health One’s ability to use the intrinsic and extrinsic resources related to each dimension of health to participate fully in the activities that contribute to growth and development, with the goal of feeling a sense of well- being as one evaluates one’s progress through life

20 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Chapter One: Shaping Your Health


Download ppt "© 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Chapter One: Shaping Your Health."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google