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UNDERSTANDING PSYCHOLOGY 10 TH EDITION By Robert Feldman Powerpoint slides by Kimberly Foreman Revised for 10th Ed by Cathleen Hunt 1 Copyright McGraw-Hill,

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Presentation on theme: "UNDERSTANDING PSYCHOLOGY 10 TH EDITION By Robert Feldman Powerpoint slides by Kimberly Foreman Revised for 10th Ed by Cathleen Hunt 1 Copyright McGraw-Hill,"— Presentation transcript:

1 UNDERSTANDING PSYCHOLOGY 10 TH EDITION By Robert Feldman Powerpoint slides by Kimberly Foreman Revised for 10th Ed by Cathleen Hunt 1 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

2  CHAPTER ELEVEN: SEXUALITY AND GENDER 2 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

3  What are the major differences between male and female gender roles? 3 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

4  Set of expectations, defined by a particular society, that indicate what is appropriate behavior for men and women  Stereotyping › Sexism  Negative attitudes and behavior toward a person that are based on that person’s gender 4 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

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6  Sexism on the Job › Women generally earn less than men do in comparable positions  Glass ceiling  Invisible barrier within an organization that, because of gender discrimination, may prevent women from being promoted beyond a certain level 6 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

7  Sexual Harassment › Unwanted sexual attention, the creation of a hostile or abusive environment, or explicit coercion to engage in unwanted sexual activity › Has less to do with sex than with power › Benevolent sexism 7 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

8  Personality Factors › Stereotype threat  Cognitive Abilities › Mathematical and verbal ability differences are minimal 8 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

9  Biological and Evolutionary Factors › Hormones such as androgens and estrogens may relate to performance on verbal and spatial tasks 9 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

10  The Social Environment › Socialization  The process by which an individual learns the rules and norms of appropriate behavior  Produces a “Gender Schema”  Mental framework that organizes and guides a child’s understanding of information relevant to gender  May potentially limit the range of experiences to which children are exposed 10 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

11  Why, and under what circumstances, do we become sexually aroused? 11 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

12  Genitals › Testes  Androgens › Ovaries  Estrogens  Progesterone  Ovulation 12 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

13  External Stimuli › Through process of learning  Erogenous Zones › Areas of the body that have an unusually rich array of nerve receptors that are particularly sensitive not just to sexual touch but to any kind of touch 13 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

14  Excitement Phase › Arousing stimulus begins a sequence that prepares the genitals for sexual intercourse  Penis, clitoris, vagina  Plateau Phase › Body’s preparation for orgasm 14 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

15  Resolution Stage › Body returns to its resting state, reversing the changes brought about by arousal  Refractory Period › Men are unable to develop an erection and therefore are unable to have another orgasm and ejaculate 15 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

16  What is “normal” sexual behavior?  How do most people behave sexually?  How prevalent are rape and other forms of nonconsenting sex, and what are their causes? 16 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

17  What are the major sexually transmitted infections?  What sexual difficulties do people most frequently encounter? 17 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

18  Sexual behavior is considered abnormal if it produces a sense of distress, anxiety, or guilt – or if it is harmful to some other person › There are few universally accepted absolute rights and wrongs 18 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

19  Alfred Kinsey’s surveys on sexual behavior › First systematic approach to learning about human sexual behavior › Masturbation:  Solitary sex  Sexual self-stimulation 19 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

20  Sexual attraction and behavior directed to the other sex › Premarital Sex  Double standard  Permissiveness with affection › Marital Sex › Extramarital Sex 20 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

21  Homosexual › Sexually attracted to members of their own sex  Gay  Lesbian  Bisexual › Sexually attracted to people of the same sex and the other sex 21 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

22 22 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

23  What determines whether people become homosexual or heterosexual? › Nature/genetic causes? › Differences in brain structures? › Child-rearing or family dynamics? › Learning theory?  Seems unlikely that any one factor orients a person towards hetero- or homosexuality  No relationship between sexual orientation and psychological adjustment 23 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

24  Transsexuals › People who believe they were born with the body of the other gender  Some seek sex-change operations › Transgenderism  People who view themselves as a third gender  Transvestites  Intersex/hermaphrodite › Someone who is born with an atypical combination of sexual organs or chromosomal or gene patterns 24 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

25  Rape › When one person forces another person to submit to sexual activity such as intercourse or oral-genital sex  Date rape  Childhood Sexual Abuse › In most cases it is a relative or acquaintance › Most cases go unreported 25 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

26  Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) › Medical condition acquired through sexual contact  Chlamydia  Genital herpes  Trichomoniasis  Gonorrhea  Syphilis  Genital warts  AIDS 26 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

27  Know your sexual partner  Use condoms  Avoid the exchange of bodily fluids, particularly semen  Stay sober  Consider the benefits of monogamy 27 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011

28  Sexual Problems › Erectile dysfunction › Premature ejaculation › Inhibited ejaculation › Anorgasmia (women)  Primary orgasmic dysfunction  Secondary orgasmic dysfunction › Inhibited sexual desire 28 Copyright McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2011


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